SOT- Feelin' Guilty about buying Chinese This n That...

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Give me a break. Blood lust, Power lust? A bunch of Europeans came upon a continent, rich with resources and populated by stone age people. They did what anybody with their moral and ethical background would do and exploited it. We are the result. Fat, dumb and happy. The solution to everyone having "enough" on this planet is population control. In the short, selfish term, it means population control in the United States. There's a lot to go around on this planet if the number to whom it must "go around" is small. If that number is sufficiently large, there can never be enough to go around. Sooner or later, humans will take steps to control their numbers or natural forces will intervene and it won't be pretty.
bob g.
snipped-for-privacy@thanks.com wrote:

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On Mon, 18 Oct 2004 00:20:10 -0500, Robert Galloway

The U.S. is hardly and issue on the population front. Our actual birth rate is only slightly above replacement, while much of the world is several times that. The population growth in the U.S. is largely fueled by immigration.
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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Bob,
You don't sound happy <g>
R
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Robert Galloway did say:

Fat, dumb and happy?!?! Speak for yourself. Personally, I've still got a bit o' that blood and power lust. It's got me thinking upgrading the motor in my Jet tablesaw, and removing all safety guards from my other power tools.
--
New project = new tool. Hard and fast rule.


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This is a part of the problem. US is spending way too much money on military, and US cannot just sell the military products to any other country. This means US is sinking a lot of money on something that it cannot sell freely. If US had cut its spending on military and others, given the tax saving to private companies to encourage capital investment (_in_ US), US could have many many state of the art factories that produce many wonderful products -- and at a low cost; that would have sold well in the domestic and global market.
Jay Chan
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On Sat, 16 Oct 2004 21:08:28 -0400, "Eric Anderson"

Industrial grade equipment (excluding forklifts, for the most part) almost always has a made in the USA tag on it, as far as I've seen in any factory around here. I can't imagine using a brake press that was made in China out of plastic and tin. Maybe it is all dying out, but it really doesn't seem like it on the production floor.

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More and more machines are being made overseas. In my business, molding foam plastics, the dozen of so US manufacturers are all gone. Last one was closed about a dozen years ago.
I can buy machines from Austria, Italy, Germany, Japan, Korea.
It is good to see that companies like Minster are still around but others have shut the doors. Heald, and many like them are long gone.
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wrote:

HE&M is still making some damn nice bandsaws with a flag on them- and the HEM guys still come out to do PMs and such. A lot of the other machines are older, so I suppose it's possible the companies are no longer around. But this area is still booming like crazy when it comes to manufacturing, and it's hard to believe the hype when I see the huge amounts of spin that the news programs are using when they report layoffs around here. I live in a small town, so I usually know someone that works at any given place, and there is usually a very good reason for layoffs that has nothing to do with China or Korea.
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wrote:

is
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You mean all that American industrial equipment like Okuma, Hitachi Seiki, Mazak, Mori Seiki, Komatsu, Matsuura, Karaki ect? Yep, use that stuff daily. How about that English made Bridgeport?
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wrote:

All right, I'll give you Mazak and Bridgeport. Honestly, though- I've never seen the others around here, with the exception of forklifts. This is probably a case where I should open my mouth and insert foot. It just seems like in a lot of cases where I'm at people are only unemployed because they don't want to work, and I have a hard time trusting anything the media tells me anymore.
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If you have an industry that does much machining, they are around. The Japanese dominate the CNC machine tool market and have for many years. You do see a fair amount of Haas and Fadal (American made) though those are sold to the type of people that shop at Harbor Freight. Pretty low quality machines but they are cheap.

I tend to agree with you there.
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Tim Douglass wrote:

"US environmental standards" ?
There must be a reason why GWB won't sign the Kyoto protocol.
http://www.cbc.ca/news/background/kyoto/us.html
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The Chinese are catching up to us on the total CO2. The per capita is way down, but it is a matter or ratios in a highly populated but not fully industrialized country. I'd like to see comparitive figures as we import more from them. That was 1997.
I do know that we are soon installing about $500,000 in equipment to reduce emissions at our company. (not that it is a bad thing environmentally) It is required in most areas of the US, but not at all in China.
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Unfortunately, this is true. With more people getting richer, they start driving cars around instead of riding bicyles. This increases the CO2 emission and pollution in China.
I heard that China will be using a different type of nuclear power plants to produce electricity, and its by-products is hydrogen that will probably be used in fuel cells or in the form of liquid hydrogen that will power cars. Hopefully, this will significantly reduce CO2 emssion and pollution. Unfortunately this is all long term. I don't see any short term solution.
Jay Chan
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On 18 Oct 2004 11:20:48 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Jay Chan) wrote:

China is planning to use output from some of its future nuclear plants to produce hydrogen, but that's not a function of the new design. The "new design" is actually an evolution and refinement of an old one from the 1950's that the US and Europe decided not to use. The most important aspect of it is that it is largely immune to meltdown.
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GregP said:

I believe it's called the Pebble Bed Reactor. The Pebble Bed Reactor is an advanced nuclear reactor design. This technology claims a dramatically higher level of safety and efficiency. Instead of water, it uses helium as the coolant, at very high temperature, to drive a turbine directly. This eliminates the complex steam management system from the design, and increases the transfer efficiency (ratio of electrical output to thermal output) to about 50%.
The technology in various forms is under development by MIT, the South African power utility Eskom, General Atomic (U.S.), the Dutch company Romaha B.V., Adams Atomic Engines, a U.S. Company, and the Chinese company Chinergy, working with Tsinghua University.
FWIW,
Greg G.
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On Tue, 19 Oct 2004 11:41:06 -0400, Greg G. wrote:

Sounds like you're quoting the opening paragraphs of
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pebble_bed_reactor
Further down the page, the article notes that the pbr design originated in the 1950's.
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I thought Sweden and France were using that design.
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On Tue, 19 Oct 2004 16:07:11 GMT, "U-CDK_CHARLES\\Charles" <"Charles

I didn't know that. The US should take another look at it.
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I thought Sweden and France used Breeder reactors.
Allen
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