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Absolutely great Kevin but I was really turned off with the mechanical steel slides on the last one. May I suggest sliding dado's next time?
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steel
Or, maybe undermount slides that aren't visible.
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Holy shiat... good eye, Leon. And a good point. I didn't even notice them the first time around, now they stand out like a sore slide. Yup, they got to go.
*slaps forehead wondering why I didn't see them before....*
r
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Holy shiat... good eye, Leon. And a good point. I didn't even notice them the first time around, now they stand out like a sore slide. Yup, they got to go.
*slaps forehead wondering why I didn't see them before....* ================================== Now, now guys...., settle down. He may have had good reason to put those slides on there. He may have some VERY heavy jewelry,,,. or gold bars..., or spanish bullion. In which case, he would need those metal slides!
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Good point! But there should have been a lock too, huh? ;~)
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wrote:
Holy shiat... good eye, Leon. And a good point. I didn't even notice them the first time around, now they stand out like a sore slide. Yup, they got to go.
*slaps forehead wondering why I didn't see them before....*
But in all fairness, the boxes are top rate. I guess I quickly noticed because I built 2 jewelry chests about a year ago and all 26 drawers had the sliding dado's for slides.
Now Kevin did mention that he liked the drawers coming "all" the way out however he is obviously capable of building to tolerances close enough that the sliding dado would allow the drawers to be pulled out enough that the drawer backs would be fully visible. Basically my drawers will open far enough that only the 1/2" thick drawer back is still inside the cabinet.
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Thank you for making my point :)

I typically make the back 1/4", which with the ply bottom glued in is plenty strong. I often like to have the top drawer close to the top of the box (sometimes I avoid any cross grain situation with the top and I need no further structure at the top of the box), which can often overhang the box a fair bit. It's not so much the access to the other drawers that is a problem, but the top drawer usually the back inch or more is impossible to get to without pulling out the drawer, and if you only have 6-7 inches of drawer to start with that is a lot. I also have concerns that if the drawers are getting pulled out so that they are almost out and then left hanging there, that's putting a lot of wear on the back end of the drawer slide groove and the front of the drawer slide. Plus there's a bit of slop necessary to account for expansion/ contraction and any possible light warping. I could fit them tight if I wanted to, but I am shipping these all over the country so I feel I have to leave a bit more slop than I would like to make sure they remain operational. With the metal slides I don't have to worry about it, or have the customer do any maintenance to wax a wood slide.
-Kevin
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Snip

Something to consider and this has been discussed time and again. Many times the question has been asked, what material should I use for drawer sides. The common answer and a correct one is any material you want. Through the years I have pretty much proven time and again that the harder the wood that you use for the drawer sides and for the slide or frame that the drawer will slide on the longer the drawer will last and the better the drawer will slide. About 28 years ago I built our Oak frame dresser and built the drawer sides out of pine know knowing any better at the time. The drawers have always been draggy from the friction between the pine and oak. Varnish, wax, dry lube never really helped the matter. Additionally if you pull a drawer out you will see pine dust where the drawer bottoms are slowly wearing down. About 4 years later I built night stand chests and built the drawers and frame entirely out of oak. To this day there is no visible wear and the drawers still slide in and out as easily as if they were on ball bearing slides. Now I always try to build the drawers and their contact points out of as hard of a material as I can so that there is a long life expectancy and easy smooth movement.
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I like to make my drawer boxes out of poplar, for a few reasons. Easy to machine. I can get it in s2s 8/4 with little price premium and just rip it to 1/4" thickness for the front/back and 5/8" for the sides and it's instant drawer parts. Much less waste than dealing with 4/4. I end up with quartersawn boards, which we can pretend is relevantly more stable on an 1-3/4" wide board. And by having it as a secondary wood I can have a bunch of it prepared ahead of time all at once rather than match to the outside wood. Of course poplar isn't very hard though.
-Kevin
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When I saw there were 15 posts I knew there had to be some controversy, heh. Yeah, I don't like to see the steel either. But they are extremely functional. There really isn't room to undermount them usually, and nobody makes undermount slides short enough so I have to use the regular slides on their sides and the ones you can get short aren't rated for that either. I've tried the ones coated with white epoxy, and I don't know if I got a bad batch or what but the epoxy wore right off the ball bearing track and gummed them up so they didn't operate well even before I finished the piece, so I am reluctant to try that again. Lee Valley has 75 lb slides that are a lot lighter though not much smaller and they come down to 8".
The first time I used them exposed like that was the box that sold the fastest, so people don't seem to mind. You don't see it when it's closed, and they are so functional. I don't do it on every box, but it's definitely something I will keep doing and probably more often than not.
-Kevin
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Do you even need slides at all? Why not drawers that just slide on a flat frame with a stop to prevent them from coming all the way out? My chest of drawers works that way, minus the stop.
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wrote in message

If I may answer that, ;~) typically a jewelry chest is small, that frame that typical full sized furniture uses to support the drawers takes up precious room. Even if the support was only 1/4" thick the loss of storage area adds up in a hurry. In my particular case I would have lost about 1-3/4" of drawer space and or would have had to sacrifice a couple of drawers.
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I will admit, my wife got one of the jewelry chests that I built and I sold the other before it was finished for $1,200.00. I really don't think that I could have gotten that amount with mechanical slides.
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Leon wrote:

Holy bank account...I may take up jewelry boxes:)
--

dadiOH
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It's something I just never see anyone else do, but I do think there is a market there if you explain the benefits of them. Won't be any woodworkers buying them, but they wouldn't be buying them anyway.
And speaking of prices, that's an area I am always uncomfortable with. Usually I am selling online, but the last two are going to a gallery so I feel a little more freedom to ask a fair price, and need one since I am giving up 40% instead of around 15%. Anyone want to take a stab at pricing any of the three? I realize I haven't given dimensions, the second two are around 20" wide, the first one is around 16" tall and wide at the extremes.
-Kevin
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On Feb 17, 2:35pm, snipped-for-privacy@YAHOO.COM wrote:

.
Which woodworker could possibly afford one of those? :-}

Yup, that's my dilemma these days. I'm doing some artsy-fartsy things with my router and people pick up one of my sculpted maple leaves and want one..but then I'm at a loss. To me, it is truly waste/scrap with 15 minutes of machining time. So $ 60.00 it is, each. Then I get a call from the Legion, they want to decorate 50 soldiers' graves with them... then I can't, with a clear conscience, ask them for that much. BUT.. if I tell them, say $ 15.00 each, and the rest of the country orders 5000 of them, all other projects stop and I have to make money.... quite a dilemma. Now it's no longer scrap either. What to do, what to do.

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Robatoy wrote:

Triple the price to buyers - and present 'em as donations to the Legion.
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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Morris Dovey wrote:

And use the legion donation as a really nice tax credit.
You have already established a price per unit ;)
P D Q
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Morris Dovey wrote:

And use the legion donation as a really nice tax credit.
I dont think you can write off your time. I believe you can only write off materials when considering a donation. You give your time.
You have already established a price per unit ;)
P D Q
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Robatoy wrote: ...

...
If your doing this as part of the business and keeping books rather than just cash transactions you can claim the difference between fair market and your charge to them as business expense for a relatively small number such as that. If it were to turn to really large numbers, then you obviously have the necessity to make it have to be worth the time although one would assume there would be the "economy of scale" pricing there as well.
What you do for one doesn't have to necessarily match what you do for the other.
--
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