Some people are really just plain stupid

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QFT
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wrote:

QFT?
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QFUD: QFT is an expression of agreement and support, where the user stands behind you and one of your statements. "Quoted For Truth"
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One more thing, if moving "several feet/sec" into a blade, a SawStop isn't going to help you either.
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GarageWoodworks wrote:

I'd take my chances with the Saw Stop over a proximity switch. A second is a very long time even moving at a normal pace. You can easily feed a foot or two of mateial into a blade in one second. Don't take my word, take a 3' piece of hardboard or 1/4" plywood and time how long it takes to rip it. Try it with a piece of 3/4" hardwood too.
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BS
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You know I think if you have to replace a $100 blade and a cartridge it may serve better to prompt you to find out what you did wrong than if the blade simply spins down.
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Leon wrote:

looking at it closely, it stops the blade before your fingers get too near it. unless you're pushing wood in really fast, the blade would stop before your parts would get near the blade.
it detects the difference in light reflections by using some led lights and some sensors i would guess. seems that it could be fooled, and how would one use a push stick with that overhead guard?
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And any cuts that need the guard out of the way are without the stopping sensor. IOW, anything other than a standard rip or cross cut. Still, if inexpensive enough it seems a good alternative to spending the money needed for the full protection offered by the Saw Stop.
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.
Considering the vast majority of cuts are rips, not bad. It would need removing for sleds which are IMHO safer than standard cross cuts and rips anyway. IMHO it's a neat invention that can retrofit most saws. This type of design (a proximity sensor around the blade) might be the way to go. If he could somehow create the proximity sensor 'field' without using the over-head guard, now that would be cool.
I think he's onto something here.
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Considering the vast majority of cuts are rips, not bad. It would need removing for sleds which are IMHO safer than standard cross cuts and rips anyway. IMHO it's a neat invention that can retrofit most saws. This type of design (a proximity sensor around the blade) might be the way to go. If he could somehow create the proximity sensor 'field' without using the over-head guard, now that would be cool.
I think he's onto something here.
Absolutely, more refinement and you might see the SawStop drop in price. Competition would be a good thing.
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On 01/08/2010 01:24 AM, Puckdropper wrote:

It is the fact that the spinning blade is suddenly stopped (by jamming a chunk of aluminum into it) that provides the energy to drop the blade suddenly.
If you don't stop the blade, then some entirely different mechanism would be necessary to drop it quickly.
Chris
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If you aren't carefull enough to keep your fingers out of the sawbalde you shouldn't be using one!
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Obviousely you have not been using a saw long enough to know that that is a rather uninformed comment. Yeah 20 years experience says nothing for some people. There are many many more way to be cut by the saw blade than when you are cutting wood.
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I was ripping a 2x4 once, doing everything I knew to do for safety and using the tool properly, and the wood just exploded. Well, not exploded really, but about 3/4 of the way through the rip it suddenly twisted, broke, and generally went nuts.
The point here is that sometimes accidents happen without you doing anything wrong. Careful has little to do with it.
Puckdropper
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"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message

Precisely and it may take years for you to witness such an incident. I've seen that happen a time or two myself.
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I was ripping a 4x4 on my Shopsmith when something went terribly wrong and the end result was the flimsy blade guard was shredded in the time it took me to shut down. I looked everything over after the dust settled and decided never to use the Shopsmith for sawing again. This is a 500 model.
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"Steve Turner" wrote: --------------------------

"Lew Hodgett" wrote:

Duh!
No it doesn't.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

It works if him or Charlie is paying; me is going. I'd like a large popcorn and a soda please. .
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