Some glue questions

I had to buy some glue today, and asked the clerk what advantage titebond had over titebond II. He said there wasn't any, so I asked why they even make titebond. He didn't have any idea.
So I did a google search and found that the only advantage of titebond is that parts can be taken apart with water, so it is good for joints that might need to be taken apart.
So, my questions:
1) Can titebond joints be taken apart with water? If so, how? I made two matching cabinets, only the plywood panels came from different sheets and sure don't match. I would like to replace them on one cabinet. When I posted a question a couple weeks ago on how to do that, no one suggested dissolving the glue.
2) Is there any other advantage to titebond?
3) How susceptible to water problems is titebond? Is a cabinet in an occasionally steamy bathroom at risk?
Thanks.
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Titebond II can be exposed to wet conditions (outside, etc) and not have any problems. Titebond will eventually fail.
As far as taking glued panels apart, you'll probably have to use so much water that you'll delaminate the plywood. Titebond is pretty strong stuff.
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snipped-for-privacy@dinner.time says...

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Just to add to what Wade said, original Titebond and Titebond II are both polyvinyl acetate emulsions. Ther term 'aliphatic resin has little or no real meaning. Titebond II has the addition of some yellow colouring (pre-polymerization) and a chemical that acts to cross link the polymer chain. This cross linking makes Titebond II more resistant to degradation by water but it will still break down. Titebond II is not waterproof by any stretch of the imagination. Water resistant would be a batter term. Thus, both will fail eventually in the presence of water. For a bathroom I would definitely use Titebond II as it would resist the higher humidity more effectively.

Too true. To say that Titebond can be taken apart by water would be a stretch. It is degraded by water but you do not use water to take it apart. That would suggest reversibility and since PVA adhesives are polymerized through a chemical reaction, they are by their very nature irreversible - unlike hide glue for instance. No-one suggested taking it apart using water because it just isn't a good idea. I would probably steer closer to veneering the panel or finding another way to cover it rather than taking the cabinet apart. You could try to use creative finishing to match them better.
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On Fri, 14 Nov 2003 17:20:22 GMT, "Wade Lippman"

Yes. Warm water with a little vinegar added will loosen cured yellow carpenter's glue joints, provided the glue is not labeled "waterproof."

It's a yellow carpenter's glue. Elmer's is just as good. The joint, curing process, and clamping are very important, no matter what brand is selected.

A joint should not depend on the glue. There's no substitute for mortise and tenon joinery. Make sure you run an exhaust fan for 20 minutes during/after a steamy shower--this will prevent mold/mildew from eating the wood.

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Phisherman wrote:

As someone who's been using Elmer's for years, I have to say I think I like Titebond better. Still on my first bottle, mind you, so I haven't used it much, and I haven't tried Titebond II yet. Seems to flow much easier, and has a higher initial tack, so the parts don't want to slip around as much. It also seems to have a longer working time. If the bottle isn't telling a fib, it also won't transform irreversibly into cheese if I accidentally let it freeze.
Strength wise, I doubt it matters. I've got Elmer's-glued stuff that has held up for years.
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On Sat, 15 Nov 2003 01:04:22 -0500, Silvan

I agree, but I switched years ago. Elmer's may have changed since then.
I've always found Titebond easier and more predictable to work with, and it seems to sand better.
Barry
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....

I went back to using Titebond for most of my gluing. Titebond II was too viscous, and more of a pain to use.
You are better off with a variety of adhesives --- Polyurethane, white (for more working time), yellow, water-resistant yellow, 5 min epoxy, System 3 regular epoxy, hide glue, and hot shot. They all have a place in the shop.
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