Sold my first work yesterday

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snipped-for-privacy@codesmiths.com says...

very cool! What is neater than pretending to be one of the Knights of the Round Table?
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pretending to be king!
Mark & Juanita wrote:

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BRuce


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says...

I graduated in '76. My friends and I all drove old rag topped jeeps to school. After school we'd all be out ground hog hunting. We couldn't leave the guns in the jeeps, so we used to keep them in our lockers at school. How much time do you think I would get these days if I took an 30-06 through the front door of the school with two loaded clips. Back then nobody even gave it a second thought.
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Robert Smith wrote:

We did the same thing in MI 'cept when we took the new ones out and did show-and-tell. You wouldn't do any time though, SWAT would take you out long before that was an issue. Dave in Fairfax
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reply-to doesn't work
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daveldr at att dot net
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Robert Smith wrote:

30-06 for ground hogs? What did y'all use for deer, .458 Winchester or .460 Weatherby? <G>
I'm class of '77. It was a different epoch.
-- Mark
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snipped-for-privacy@verizon.no.spam.net says...

Me too.

yep, we didn't take guns to school but, with the tacit approval of the chemistry teacher, cooked up black powder and tested various formulations for the purpose of building rocket motors. The rocket motor casings were aluminum pipe -- can you imagine what would happen these days? "Students arrested for building pipe bombs in classroom, teacher suspended"
FWIW, we got a couple of good launches, the weak links were finding reliable ignitor approaches and a reliable means of keeping the nosecone attached. It was a very practical introduction to solving engineering problems and got us involved in researching literature; it was my first exposure to the rocket equation.
We also exercised good practices regarding range safety -- since our high school was essentially in the middle of a wheat field, we would drive out on a country road, find a location with a nice, drainage ditch and set up such that we were well removed and under cover during launches.

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different guns for everything. 22-250 seemed to be the weapon of choice. But when they would shoot them, you could hardly tell they were hit. When I shot one you normally had a few loose pieces. Back then I couldn't afford more guns, I spent most of my income on chasing women. Strange, I figured once I caught one, I could start spending all the money on me. And to think, back then I knew everything.
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Late 50's and early 60's ... During dove season, and when there was no practice, I occasionally rode my buckskin mare, Nancy Hanks, to school carrying my 20ga Remington Model 11 shotgun with a couple boxes of shells in a shell vest. I tied the horse to the back fence with a halter and, because the lockers weren't big enough, brought the gun and game bag to woodshop for storage (OBWW).
Damn, how times have changed ...
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Swingman wrote:

And how!
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Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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Those kids are at the perfect age for the perfect toy tools ---
Right now, Sears has some of the (ok, I'll use the word!) cutest darned toy tools on sale (see the "My First Craftsman" tools sets). The skil saw, the drill/driver set and the chain saw even make sort of realistic sounds when the triggers are pushed. They're probably greater gift ideas for us grown-ups though :-)
--
Steve
www.ApacheTrail.com/ww/
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On Mon, 22 Dec 2003 21:08:08 -0700, "Steve"

Look for the "powRsound" plastic chain saw with the "working" chain made of bathroom basin chain. Friend of mine has three of them, and uses them for juggling.
-- Klein bottle for rent. Apply within.
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Not any more. <sigh> They went bankrupt.
Jim Stuyck
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I don't do wood working for money, but as a PC guru, many friends and relatives have asked me to do work for them. Here's what I've learned:
1. Never do projects for money for friends or relatives. If it's a favor you're going them, and it's on your timeline, that's fine.
2. If you insist on ignoring #1, give a quote in writing, and have them sign off on it before you even go looking for your car keys to drive to the lumber yard.
If you ignore #1 and #2, it's your own fault if you get screwed over on the money.
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Same here. I give(or offer) my stuff to people I know will appreciate it and not to people who ask. Some relatives and acquaintances say something like,"Oh I would love to have something like that for my deck(living room, home etc etc)." and I reply,"Oh, I don't do commission work.".....that shuts them up and gets the message across.
Larry
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Congrats on your "sale". Sounds like you had fun and you'll make a child happy (assuming the hammer thing works out). Since it doesn't sound like you intend to make your living at this, that's what matters most. I'm just finishing up my first furniture project in many years, a full-length mirror frame in a style reminiscent of Greene and Greene. I enjoyed this project because it allowed me to unapologetically indulge my perfectionist tendencies, something I'm unable to do in many of my other endeavors. I've spent close to forty hours on this frame detailing the through mortise and tenon joinery and doing a bit of carving as well. I'll admit entertaining idle daydreams of doing this sort of satisfying work for a living, but as you mention, it's tough to make the numbers work out. If I were to offer up mirror frames like the one I just completed, it would require well over $1000 a copy to make the business at all viable. There's just no way around the fact that the hand work involved in a project like (when done right) is considerable indeed. That's what gives an object like this it's underlying character. I have a newfound sense of respect for the artists out there who are able to find patrons willing to recognize this and pay accordingly. It's probably getting tougher and tougher as the Walmart mindset permeates our culture.
Richard Johnson Camano Island, WA
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A (long) while back I was approached by a friend to do a barter deal. She would have some custom curtains made for our dining room (paying for all the materials and labor) in exchange for an L-shaped lidded storage bench for her apartment (for which she would pay for the materials; all I had to supply was design knowledge and labor). Seemed like a pretty good deal.
She got her part of the bargain finished and came and installed the curtains. I showed her the work in progress out in the garage (feeling guilty for not having it finished yet). "No worries", she tells me, "I still have to move the old armoire where this goes." When I finally did finish the bench I called her to arrange delivery and she told me she still didn't have room for it. She would need another couple weeks to clear the space (divorce situation). That was a month ago. This damn thing is now taking up valuable space in MY dining room (needed room in the garage to get on to SWMBO's next project).
I'm still happy to do work for friends. But I've learned that there has to be an agreed upon timeline, on BOTH sides!
Ian
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Larry Bud) wrote in message

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well you are running about $4 an hour over I am currently getting. I have been doing commissioned "prototypes" and what I have been charging is cost of materials plus 10 - 20 percent. doing it as a learning experience, I figure I can play with their wood, not mine. Been having lots of fun, building stuff that i wouldn't have a need for and it is not costing me for the materials. the 10 -15% gets me a new tool or 2 and that is fine at this point.
when I deliver I always tell then how many hours were involved and then they understand why I don't do this to make money... at the moment.
BRuce
Joe Willmann wrote:

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That's the right attitude. Any woodworking I do for money (so far only one project), I do for mainly for the fun of it. Any money I earn I look at as a bonus that I can use to get that new tool I wanted. And I NEVER look at the $/hour factor.
-Chris
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