Soft close hinge question

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I have a client that wants a wall of garage cabinets. There will be 2 doors that will each be 21" wide and 90" tall. Additionally there will be 6 doors that will be 18" by 25" tall.
With that in mind I am giving him 2 options for types of doors, solid panel 3/4" thick water resistant MDF or 3/4" thick poplar frame and 1/4" paint grade panels.
He wants soft close hinges, Euro style.
I will likely have 4 hinges on each of the large doors and 2 one the smaller doors.
1. Do buy all soft close hinges or only 1 soft close hinge mixed with a standard appropriate hinge?
2. Use standard hinges and add the soft close "add on" unit to each door.
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What operating range ? <110 degree only for integral soft close ? > If you want a 120 or 180 degree range - the soft close damper is separate option and clips onto the hinge .. or dampers are available as stand-alone - to be used with any springed hinge. I would go with clip-on - then you can add or remove - to suit the spring pressure of the various doors. John T.
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On 03/04/2016 9:13 AM, Leon wrote:

Should be rating by weight from manufacturer, Leon?
For the big 'uns I get roughly 35-40 lb/door which is substantial if go MDF.
I'd suggest unless there's something in these 90" cabinets that is actually 7-ft long (which I suppose is possible if is planning on hanging yard tools behind doors which personally I think is a mistake, too :) ) he'll rue the decision down the road...but that's not the question asked...
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On 3/4/2016 9:45 AM, dpb wrote:

I should probably check in to that on the web site. ;~)

On tall doors, the lower 58 or so inches will store golf clubs, above that a fixed shelf and an adjustable shelf.
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On 3/4/2016 10:14 AM, Leon wrote:

If you need a jointer to whip stiles that long into stock flat enough for doors, you do know someone who has one ... LOL
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On 03/04/2016 10:14 AM, Leon wrote:

...

Boy, I'd really try to talk him into splitting 'em at the fixed shelf height then. As Robert says, keeping those in plane for 20 yr in a garage is going to be no mean feat...
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On 3/4/2016 11:46 AM, dpb wrote:

If he swallows the price I gave him I may make that 4 doors on that cab instead of 2.
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On 3/4/2016 9:13 AM, Leon wrote:

Except for 3-8 doors or ones that extraordinarily heavy, I rarely use more than 3 hinges on any door.
IME, and particularly with cabinets doors, it is rarely necessary, and you will find adjusting the alignment of four euro hinges for smooth operation over a long length can be problematic if there is even the slightest lack of flatness, which is not unusual with taller doors over time.
AAMOF, a couple of times I've had to remove a hinge completely, and plug the cup hole, to get a door to work properly.
Then again, if you feel the need, and it works, go with your gut.

IME, they all need to be the same. Insuring all hinges are the same type, make and model is paramount for a smooth, lasting operation.

I'll choose a high quality, built-in soft close, hinge over an "add on" part every time ... more points of failure, higher possibility for call backs.
YMMV ... and as long as it works, and the client is happy...
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On 3/4/2016 9:49 AM, Swingman wrote:

It does get tricky when more than 2 hinges are used. I think he is going to steer toward the lighter frame and panel doors so I may revisit 2 or 3 hinges on each.

OK, all the same.

One more question, the all in one units, are you buying the edge mount FF style hinges?

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On 3/4/2016 10:20 AM, Leon wrote:

In soft close, I particularly like the 110 S/C Salice hinges ... good overlay and installation, choices and the quality/price ration has been excellent, to date.
CornerStone is my goto supplier and I usually go with something on this page:
http://www.cabinethardware.com/SearchResults.asp?Search=salice+110
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On 3/4/2016 10:47 AM, Swingman wrote:

I found a Blum, essentially the same that I buy 50 at a time but with soft close.
http://www.wwhardware.com/blum-compact-38n-1-2-overlay-edge-mount-built-in-soft-close-hinge
And the hinge I normally use.
http://www.wwhardware.com/blum-compact-38n-105-self-closing-hinges-b038n
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On 3/4/16 4:07 PM, Leon wrote:

I just installed a bunch of those on a hinge replacement job and I was impressed with their strength, adjustability, and operation. Good choice IMO.
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On 3/4/2016 4:34 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

The soft close? The regular close Blum is pretty tough, I have probably bought 3~4 hundred of them over the years. Much cheaper in boxes of 50 and they often go on sale for about $1 each in boxes of 50.
And a life time warranty. I have had a couple of Blum's fail, not this design, I installed them in 1990ish. Blum replaced all, broken or not, on a particular door. They were slightly different but not enough to cause a visual impact.
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On 3/4/16 5:36 PM, Leon wrote:

Yes, soft close. I will go to them again. The only thing that would make them better is an up-down adjustment that didn't involve loosening the fastening screw. But I get it. Without loosening both (all) fastening screws on the door, some serious torque could be exerted on a non-loosened hinge.
BTW, there's a tiny little switch in the cup-side of the hinge for turning the soft-close on-off. I guess that could come in handy for fine tuning a 3-hinge door.
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On 3/4/2016 7:58 PM, -MIKE- wrote: Sbip

I noticed that little grey spot and then determined it was a switch. Pretty cool.
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On 3/4/2016 10:20 AM, Leon wrote:

I know you already know this, but for anyone else wondering, I'd talk up the water resistant MDF slab doors hard, and also turn those tall ones into 2 each.
MDF may be heavy, but once finished, much more likely to start flat, and stay flat over time, and so damned easy/inexpensive to cut/replace, and they look great.
Remember these?
https://goo.gl/photos/LoZGU8oJAfXDQc6i9
Linda and I were invited for this past Thanksgiving dinner and those doors are still as flat, with the same precise 3/32 reveal, as the day you and I installed them five years ago.
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On 3/4/2016 12:03 PM, Swingman wrote:

I just learned today that Hardwood Products no longer caries the green water resistant MDF. ;~) Have you bought it any other place?

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On 3/4/16 9:13 AM, Leon wrote:

All integrated soft-close hinges. They difference in price is minuscule and would be superseded by your labor to install the adapters.
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On 3/4/2016 11:40 AM, -MIKE- wrote:

I think that is a good idea, I typically buy Blum 1/2" overlay 50 at a time. I just learned that the same hinge comes with soft close.
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On Friday, March 4, 2016 at 9:14:00 AM UTC-6, Leon wrote:

I think the manufacturer's suggestion would be the way to tackle the number of hinges. They will have their calculations built into their recommendations that will include weight and the ability of the hinges to move a door.
Also... might I suggest MDO instead of MDF for the large doors if you go that route? Water resistant MDF will warp and move in high temps and humidity, IME << even after sealing >>.
MDO would be probably be lighter too. If you went with the rail/stile construct, you could also use MDO in your panels for a split decision between your two presented options.
Even if the MDF was "water resistant", that doesn't mean you won't get movement. (DAMHIKT) At the least, I would borrow Karl's Earlex and squirt a coat of shellac on the faces before starting, and then again on the edges after cutting to final size.
Just a couple of thoughts...
Robert
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