So when is the finishing finished?

Page 2 of 2  
"Greg Guarino" wrote in message

For things like this my rule of thumb is to apply two more coats than it takes to end up with a flat finish... For example, if it takes 4 sanded coats to get the finish flat and the grain filled then I add two more. This as the finish can be real thin in areas once flattened so the two additional coats gives at least that much finish on the whole surface.
The species of wood influences this to a great degree... in my experience red oak takes a lot more coats to level and fill than does cherry or maple... walnut is generally somewhere in between.
Note that I only use a thinned coat for the first coat... everything after that is not thinned. With thinned coats for all coats your build will be less per coat so more will be needed...
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
With thinned coats for all coats your build will be

It is not really appropriate to build for a flat surface using a film finish (varnish, lacquer, shellac, poly). If you want flatness then use grain filler. Finishes that thick will crack\craze over time most likely.
If you are applying enough finish to flatten red oak you have developed a slab of plastic over the wood.
I finish cherry with a few coats of wipe on poly and until I wax it, you can still feel the grain even after sanding the wood initially with 320.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"SonomaProducts.com" wrote in message
With thinned coats for all coats your build will be

I guess this is an "it depends" situation and a matter of what is considered finishing and what is considered preparation... As such, perhaps I should have been more explicit. There are degrees of flatness and degrees of finish thickness. If a surface is really uneven, an extreme example being over-sanded pine, or hasn't been grain filled, then it would take a lot of finish to flatten it. I don't see either of those situations as a finishing problem, rather they are a preparation problem. On the other hand, well flattened and, if needed, grain filled raw wood can still have slight unevenness that can be flattened in the finishing process. Often times this slight unevenness is not noticeable until there is some finish on the piece. In these cases most of the finish is removed when sanding between coats and the final finish thickness is quite thin. Even under these circumstance I find differences across species of wood but I've never had problems in these cases...
On the other hand, dumping on a thick coat of finish, as you note, is a recipe for future problems! I've seen finishes so thick on some pieces that it looked like there was a piece of plastic over the top of the wood... I have to imagine that they didn't look so good as they aged!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 17 Mar 2013 21:41:13 -0700 (PDT), Greg Guarino

Reminds me of a tour I took of a foundry that creates those shiny brass doors for large, impressive buildings. As expected, the tour ended in the finishing room where an old gentleman was busy polishing one of the fancy doors. As the tour group was leaving, I hung back and asked the old man, "How do you know when it's polished enough?" He replied, "It's never done but, one day they just come and take it away." :-)
Gerry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.