So That's What Kick-Back Is!

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Any padding would add safety to some degree, but I think it would be more important to find a way to not be in the line of fire in the first place. I made myself a heavy denim smock that covers almost all of me from the neck down including most of my wheelchair, purpose being to minimize the dust that would normally cover me like a blanket. Added a chest pouch to carry the occasional device like a tape measure or small square and it has protected me from the occasional flying debris. Gets damned hot though. Had a comment once from someone seeing me wearing it that I looked like a midget wearing one of those big hoop skirts from the 1850's.
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Good advice but far from certain safety. See my previous post. Cross-cuts may get you at surprising angles from the cut line.
Tim Ellestad

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I've read all the responses. Good teaching.
Upscale, I can only imagine the difficulties you face. I do NOT want to try to feed a table saw from a chair of any description.
Thanks guys, I hope a few other readers learned a bit from the thread. Maybe it'll save someone who's not wearing a cup from a really uncomfortable experience.
Regards.
Tom
BTW - the bruise is a truly glorious purple now, just starting green at the edges! And the daughter's little gift is coming along after a re-cut or two. Flame maple sides, cherry bottom and lid. Once done, I'll post pics. Maybe of bruise too, so some can enjoy a pantless 128 pounder. Oh, I'll keep it clean - a thong for modesty. Ain't that a scary thought! :~
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On Sun, 07 Aug 2005 18:02:30 -0500, Tom Banes

I almost consider a cup necessary safety precaution around my RAS.
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Modat22 wrote:

If you use your right hand to steady the workpiece and operate the Radial Arm Saw with your left hand your body will not be in line with the blade, nor your shoulder with the motor, and the fingers of your hand on the workpiece will be well clear of the blade thus helping to avoid kickbacks to the gut, dislocated shoulders, broken clavicles, and amputated thumbs.
That sounds awkwards at first, but once you try it I think you'll like it.
--

FF


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A friend of mine told me he saw this ad in the paper recently (quoted secondhand from memory): "Radial arm saw for sale. Used once to cut off thumb. Make offer."
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Tom Banes wrote:

Use a Leather apron. Wear a face mask when cutting small parts. Don't touch until the saw stops spinning.
I do.
Glad it only hurt...
-- Will R. Jewel Boxes and Wood Art http://woodwork.pmccl.com The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it. George Bernard Shaw
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