so a dummy buys a ras...

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A RAS has the good behavior to sit quietly (most of the time) in one place, along the wall just waiting to be used. A table saw in use requires enough space, on both sides of the blade (leading and trailing), for the workpiece to be pushed through. My Dad was a cabinetmaker for 40 years; his shop was laid out all around the TS, but it was about 30'x120'. I can't make the same commitment of floor space in my double garage, so I use a RAS. A lot of the rips I need to make are less than 30" long, so I use an auxilliary fence parallel to the blade travel. Clamped to the normal fence it gives a reliable reference that allows me to rip with the RAS used in its normal crosscut fashion. As I usually have it set up, I get about 16" of travel; by flipping the piece and cutting from each end I can make a safe, accurate cut about 32" long. When that isn't long enough, I usually use the bandsaw or a circular saw.
Steve
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Let me ask you something, Steve: are the rips good enough for glue ups? I couldn't get a quality rip from my old Sears TS, but my Unisaw with WWII lets me rip as smooth as a baby's butt and straight as an arrow.
Dave
Steve Peterson wrote:

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David,
Using a properly aligned RAS (I'm talking DeWalt/OSC RAS models), a correct blade such as a Forrest WW1 TCP blade, your rips are PERFECT for glue up.
--
Rumpty

Radial Arm Saw Forum: http://forums.delphiforums.com/woodbutcher/start
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I usually make at least one pass through the jointer before trying to glue anything. I do have a WWII blade and it does make a nice cut, but the jointer still makes it cleaner and assures a right angle.
Steve

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I haven't had any trouble with making perpendicular cuts with my Unisaw, due to the positive, repeateable stop for the tilt mechanism. My Crapsman TS, on the other hand... <g>
Dave
Steve Peterson wrote:

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Dave Hall wrote:

Trying to run a board in the wrong direction on a rip cut would be pretty evident to any aware person since the hold down and the kickback device on the saw blade shield would obviously be backward.
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When ripping, yes.

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True - and that's part of the reason that ripping is better done on a table saw.

--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller wrote:

Well, I personally think it matters not a whig as long as one has either set up properly...I choose to rip on thr RAS precisely <because> I have it set up such that it is the most convenient tool for the job in my shop arrangement...
imo, ymmv, $0.02, etc., ...
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wrote:

of
YEP. The proper procedure for ripping on every RAS I've seen is into the climbing teeth. Read the manual. If you've got one that's different, a lot of us would like to know. It's one reason why folks don't do it much if they have an alternative. The guard can be rotated forward to limit the lift on some (those with anti-kickback pawls), but the modern ones benefit more from a featherboard clamped to the fence, because they've got the semicircular blade guards.
Speaking of the fence, it is another reason why ripping on the RAS, even if you move it out from the wall to get better position, can be a bit troublesome. Too many people don't keep an uncut piece of slick-faced whatever available to reference. The cuts can trap the board due to a bit of misalignment, or catch a splinter, stopping the feed. Very frustrating. Also a temptation to unsafe reaching or forcing....
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All of which shows why RASs are ill-suited to ripping. Their principle purpose, for which they are very well suited, is crosscutting - where the teeth at the leading edge spin down.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller wrote:

They do on mine when you rip wood? Otherwise you would have to hold back on the wood. Spin down when you crosscut.
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LOL!,...Well said,...and o-so-true!
Schroeder
(Doug Miller)
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This is supposedly some good info on RAS's. I dont have one but hope to get my dad's old saw some day.
http://www.wired-2-shop.com/joneakes/ProductDetail.asp?ProdID=3&nPrdImageID=&CatID=3
Darrell

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So a friend of mine offered me a RAS, as he's got two sitting in his garage (in pieces). I've got a tablesaw, a miter saw, but I'm thinking this saw could still be a useful addition to my arsenal. Or am I dreaming? I was thinking it would be as useful as having a crosscut sled set up, and useful for cutting dado's and rabbets. Probably keep it at 90 degrees almost all the time.
Clint

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I have had mine for about 6 years and I realy like it. However I don't use it on a daily basis it comes in very handy.

regards
good
most
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wrote:

================I have owned a RAS for at least 40 years and it has not moved off a 90 degree cut for the last 30 years....I also own a CMS and a couple of Tablesaws..which are both used...
The RAS is pretty useful for dado's especially if they do not need to be dead on accurate...89.90 degrees or so... lol...
Sorry but my old Delta Contractors saw is set up with a dead on adjustabe sled just for doing crosscuts of less then 30 inches in lenght... the RAS is used ONLY for rough cutting crosscuts... anything over 30 inches that I need super accurate cross cuts is done on my Cabinet saw also with a sled....
Actually my CMS is only used ocassionaly and also never for accurate cuts.... I just prefer the feel of using the RAS over the CMS.... BUT If I were a young man and just starting out I would go for the CMS to save space...
Bob G.
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Well, that's probably my biggest issue with getting the RAS; the space required for it. But I was thinking that the RAS, CMS, and drill press all have similar "long board" requirements, so maybe they can co-exist on a wall somewhere.
Clint

garage
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On Tue, 14 Jun 2005 00:26:21 GMT, Adam

Don't listen to chicken littles about the RAS. It's as safe as any other powered, toothed implement in your shop. Operator stupidity, now; that's another matter.
However, get the book by Wally Kunkel ("Mr. Sawdust") at http://www.mrsawdust.com . It's focus is on Dewalt RAS' and their structure, but much of the material is useful to any RAS owner. $29.95, but worth it. You'll certainly get something out of it.
--
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
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I've got a RAS and find it to be very useful, and safe. I don't rip on it only because I'm used to using my table saw for that. It allows me to cut miters in an easier fashion than fidling with the miter gauge on the table saw though. It's invaluable for cutting down stock to length when the boards are long. As for keeping it in adjustment, well I have a craftsman from around 1984 maybe and I set it up myself then. Today, not a single adjustment has needed to be made and it still cuts dead on. Clean it up, plug it in, and give a go! Cheers, cc

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