so a dummy buys a ras...

Page 1 of 5  

I just bought a used but in beautiful shape old craftsman radial arm saw and here's what I've learned so far, It's heavy, I won't ever be moving it alone again. It starts with a key. It purrs like a kitten.
Now I just need to learn everything else about it, particularly in regards to keeping all the parts I was born with attached. Anyone know of any good books available that cover these saws or have any personal advice they want to share?
I believe the saw is from around 1959, it came with some accessories, most original and new in the box. If anyone's intersted I can post some pictures in abpw.
Thanks for taking the time to read this, Adam
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

RAS's are a nasty piece of gear. A blade with sharp teeth at 3500 RPM is not only dangerous as is..but now we're hanging that on a little carriage?!?!?! It's no secret that I thoroughly dislike the beasts.
Be careful, Adam.... concentrate, focus and you'll be fine.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robatoy wrote:

I don't understand what the big deal is with RAS. My first big tool was a RAS (which in hindsight was a mistake). The only operation I didn't think was safe was ripping. Everything else was fine with normal care being taken.
--
Mortimer Schnerd, RN

snipped-for-privacy@carolina.rr.com.REMOVE
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

<snip>
Since an RAS is in the list of possible first fixed saws I've been thinking about, could you please elaborate on this? Thanks.
Kurt
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The best RAS you can buy is a "used" DeWalt here in the US or a new RAS from "Original Saw Company" There are no other RAS's worth buying IMHO.
Join us to find out why: Radial Arm Saw Forum: http://forums.delphiforums.com/woodbutcher/start
--
Rumpty

Radial Arm Saw Forum: http://forums.delphiforums.com/woodbutcher/start
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

IF, I were to re-invest in a RAS..and I mean *IF*.. I'd be wanting an Original Saw Company 12" No doubt about it. Wonderfully built.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm always mystified at the prejudice displayed toward RASs by those who have never owned and rarely used one.
Radial arm saws are WAAAAAY safer than table saws. When operating the RAS, one hand is *always* on the handle of the saw and it is therefore impossible to amputate that hand or any of its digits - and to keep the other hand safe, all you have to do it put it someplace that isn't in the path of the blade, and keep it there.
Kickback is a rare event, and if it occurs, the workpiece is thrown *away* from the operator, not *toward* him as with a TS.
Crosscutting long boards on a table saw is insane by comparison with doing the same on a radial arm saw.
Ripping looks scary... but think about it - there's less blade exposed during rip operations on a RAS than on a TS (assuming you haven't done something stupid like removing the guard).
I know I'm coming perilously close to violating the Usenet Prime Directive by attempting to inject a dose of reality into a discussion, but, please, let's at least attempt to be a little bit objective here.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I agree with you.

one
to
all
and
the
during
by
let's
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
So crosscut very long boards on a CMS. Using the right tool for the job is part of "safety first". If I can maintain control of a board on my TS sled, I'll cross cut on the TS for critical cuts. I don't get perfectly straight cuts on my CMS, because it isn't a slider. if I had a slider, the movement of the blade would insure a straight cut. Plus the quality of cut is better on my TS w/ WWII or the double sided melamine blade.
I spoke with a neighbor about his dust-gathering RAS. He confirmed for me that it won't stay adjusted. One of the bugaboos that afflict all but the very best models according to many reports. Since I don't (and won't) own one, I have no personal experience with one. I'd like to keep it that way.
Did Rumpty pay you for the RAS plug? (VBG)
Dave
Doug Miller wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 14 Jun 2005 03:03:28 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Aside from the OP possibly being a troll ...otherwise he should take up knitting ... How do you compare when ripping? I watched a neighbour trying to manipulate with one arm on either side of the blade. I *gave* him a table saw. Now he's making money. The RAS has its uses which improve on the TS, but the TS is my choice for ripping, and a few other odds and sods. Safety is not so much the tool as the idiot using it [been there in spades.]
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Guess who wrote:

I grant you that it is easier/better to rip on a table saw - should be, that's what it is meant to do - put ripping on a RAS isn't all that hard and no more dangerous than on a table saw...one keeps one's hands and body where they should be (out of the way of danger) in both cases.
-- dadiOH ____________________________
dadiOH's dandies v3.06... ...a help file of info about MP3s, recording from LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that. Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

TS is my choice when ripping, too, but that's more a matter of convenience than one of safety IMO. It's just easier to reach. And of course a TS offers a wider rip capacity.
As far as safety is concerned, I think they're comparable.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's "multiple-cut mesmerization" to me. The ones I've gone on have almost always been, with the RAS, cutting multiple pieces to length and forgetting how wide their palm was. With tablesaws, accidents are more frequent, but usually involve forgetting where their fingers were when ripping multiple pieces.
My personal worst, to date, was my bandsaw. Turn the saw off, start to brush dust away. SHEESH! Lucky I can still bend that knuckle.
Now chainsaw accidents, on the other hand - or should I say foot, because that's been most common, are really grisly....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have a good friend who was cutting some stock on a band saw. He is one of those guys who doesn't have a very developed sense of pain. Which makes him a super athlete. He doesn't know when to quit. But doesn't help him much with safety and pwer tools.
He was cutting on a band saw and cut one of his fingers in half, the long way. It just split the finger wide open, right down the middle. Just like a hot dog cut in half to grill it.
Wrapped it up, went to the hospital. The surgeon didn't do too much. He said he didn't have to. It healed up nicely. Big gnarly scar down the center of the finger. It is a little bigger than the other fingers. A little stiff. And it acts up when the weather changes.
But it still works. He said he didn't feel it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robatoy wrote:

You've just never met my wife's step father. He can turn *any* tool - power or not - into something lethal.
-- dadiOH ____________________________
dadiOH's dandies v3.06... ...a help file of info about MP3s, recording from LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that. Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lee Michaels wrote:

Add removing the ability to procreate and I'm with you.
--
dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

http://69.64.173.24/Accidents/search.htm Search criteria: tool involved = tablesaw, accident type = needed medical attention. Read the third one. I'm sure there are more.

True - but how does that reflect on the safety of their tools?

So is a table saw.

Nonsense. A radial arm saw with proper guards has *less* blade exposed than a table saw - on mine, unless I lift the guard above the work, the amount of blade exposed is *zero*.

When the conditions that cause work to be pinched between table and blade on a RAS occur on a TS, the result is that the work is thrown back at the operator at over a hundred miles an hour. I do not consider that to be a point in favor of the table saw.

Stupid. Very stupid. But not the fault of the tool.

I hope that you have done more than just stand there watching, mute. If not, shame on you.

Nonetheless, they *are* invalid. The tool is not, in and of itself, inherently unsafe. That stupid people get hurt while using one is not an indictment of the saw but of the dangers of stupidity.

Right - but in the hands of a stupid, careless moron, *any* power tool is dangerous.

Wrong.
SawStop aside, please explain how the safety aspect does *not* rest entirely on the operator with a table saw. Or with a band saw. Or with any other tool, for that matter.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:
[snipped]

*sigh* That was my point. Now try THAT move with a table saw.

I certainly didn't startle him into a worse situation by yelling at that moment. Then we had a little chat, and I set him adrift on an ice-floe.

[more snippage]

I think you mean to say that you disagree. That's fine.

I'd be arguing against my own position. Why would I do that? Have you read ANYHING I wrote?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not relevant. It's a stupid thing to do. You can make similar stupid moves on a table saw. So what? That doesn't mean that radial arm saws are dangerous. It means that stupidity is dangerous.
[snip]

entirely

Perhaps then you could explain what you meant, when you said that the safety of a RAS rests entirely with the operator.

Indeed I have. Have you? You've been insisting that radial arm saws are dangerous, and, by implication, more so than other tools. This is a position based more on prejudice than on evidence.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

What my opinion is based on is personal experience. I feel way more comfortable with a table saw than with a radial arm saw.
I'm just not big on whirling blades on the end of wobbly little carriages dangling from floppy arms.
I don't like the concept, lack of accuracy, and inherent danger of a radial arm saw. I think the whole machine is an answer to the question nobody asked.
Sliding table-saw... now you're talking. ( ..and yes, you CAN mess yourself up with one of those as well, if not careful.)
Then again, I'm a huge fan of Onsrud-style overhead pinrouters, so WTF do I know?
BTW.....just so I can make your day, Doug, you are right often about many things. I just happen to disagree with you on this issue, although I have seen large pendulum-style swinging saws with which I don't have a problem. Go figgur.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.