Snowing in Houson

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wrote:

Having grown up on the plains of Colorado, and now living in Tucson (where it does rain occasionally), as well as spending 17 years in Dallas, the majority of rain changes I recall went from intermittent drops to sprinkle to downpour, then back again. Tucson certainly seems to have more of the abrupt demarcations than either Dallas or the Denver area. In Colorado, I do know that the rain was often localized, i.e. while in town we would experience heavy, but once we turned onto the dirt road home (about 10 miles from town), we'd be kicking up dust. Even in those cases though, the transition was more gradual than the rain/no rain demarcations being discussed.
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ Now we'll just use some glue to hold things in place until the brads dry +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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Mark & Juanita wrote:

Just out of curiousity, which town on the eastern CO plains? We're about 30 mi from CO line in SW KS...not sure whether you were meaning you were 10 mi outside Denver or elsewhere.
Anyway, your description is pretty much true most of the time, but on the high plains where dewpoints are typically low enough that general rains are the rare exception in the warm months, it's the uplift that generates the rainfall. When it then falls, the demarcation line is quite often very abrupt and the "sprinkles" region may be only on the order of feet rather than significant fractions of a mile.
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"Duane Bozarth" wrote in message

Ahh ... Lamar, CO. You could smell it long before you got there.
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Swingman wrote:

Ahh...Ok, through there just a few weeks ago on way back home...Lamar, Granada, Holly, Coolidge, Syracuse, Johnson City, ...
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"Duane Bozarth" wrote in message

Had an Oil and Gas leasing crew in Lamar for the better part of two years back in the early 80's, so I made one or two trips a month from Houston. Mostly flew to Amarillo and drove up through that little bit of OK in a rent car, but occasionally flew to Denver and rented a plane to fly to Lamar. We had a crew of about 15 running title and buying leases, with 6 being young "landladies" fresh out of college. Had a good time .. even though we eventually had to buy and install our own coffee machine in the Lamar Motel restaurant kitchen so we could have REAL coffee.
Mighty fine folks in that part of the country, and made some good friends ...reminded me of around Web and Dimmit county, in South West Texas, with the big ranches and open spaces.
We used to go across the state line to a small bush track in KS for quarter horse races on Saturdays. Lots of funny stories/memories from that period in SE Colorado.
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Swingman wrote:

Well, as you're undoubtedly well aware, the exploration around here is getting to be pretty slim, although the higher gas prices are beginning to show some effect...most of what is going on now is opening old holes that weren't good enough back in the 50's - 60's, mostly for lack of sufficient oil vis a vis gas...a few new wells are being drilled now. All the majors have left the area entirely. The Hugoton field is being reworked by a bunch of independents w/ doing things like lowering header pressures even to the point of pulling vacuum...
The track at Syracuse is still there although I noticed that it looked like the one outside Holly hadn't operated for a number of years...
We're about 180 mi almost straight N of Amarillo...we're just to the westward edge of the dryland farming region although there's a lot of circle irrigation, too. As you say, good folk although sparsely settled as one goes further west into the drier country...
If you ever do the trip from Amarillo again, highly recommend detour to the Black Mesa area on the OK/NM/CO border west of Boise City...neat mesa country not too far out of the way and you can head on up 287 w/ just a little jog from Campo...
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"Duane Bozarth" wrote in message

We were chasing the Morrow Sand from whence the Sorrento Field produces. I still think there is another Sorrento in SE CO, but we drilled three wells of a thirty well program before the bottom fell out of the business in the middle 80's.
If pigs had wings and we could of just hung on a little longer and hit, I'd likely be typing this from a villa in Switzerland. ;>)

You woke a sleeping brain cell ... it was indeed Holly where we used to go. I was raised around running quarter horses and thoroughbreds (my 83 year old Dad still has a racehorse farm out of Navasota, Tx, http://www.hsound.com/WSS/ ), so, having an eye for horseflesh, I used to like scouring the bush tracks wherever I was.

Did that once ... would love to do it again. Damn, I love that part of the country. You feel like you have some room to spread your wings.
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Swingman wrote:

Like many others... :) My brother was in Midland (he's a vet and went down there during the boom for a fella' who was rolling in dough and started a thoroughbred stable. Boom went bust and so did the stud farm... :(

My grandad was a big fan of the flat track races, too. Used to go down to Raton, NM, which was the closest to us back then. It's a blast, totally unlike closed course, of course...

Great, glad to hear you either discovered it on your own or somebody let the secret out... Part is now a "park" but it's still remote enough to not be run over. As a high school kid I used to trailer the horse over there and ride over weekends if Dad would let me have at least one Saturday occasionally off the tractor during warm weather. Felt like I was in heaven!
The west end of that formation is the Johnson Mesa east of Raton. It's even more remote and well worth a trip along there if you're ever in Raton area. We came back that way from Santa Fe last summer after the unusual stretch of wet weather we had starting in June. It was waist high grass and green all the way from there home in mid-August...beautiful, and nearly unheard of for that time of year! (BTW, mountain snows this year are 110-150% normal so far, so just <maybe> we're beginning to finally break this 5-year drought cycle...)
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"Duane Bozarth" wrote in message

Boy howdy, but it was fun while it lasted ... it was nothing for my AE expense bill to run $5k-10k a month in those days.

Over the two year period I had that crew there we managed to find a lot of places of interest. ... not a lot do in Lamar, Co. ;)

Ahh now ... you're making my feet want to get the hell outta Dodge. I've got to get back in the harness!
Enjoyed the reminiscing, Duane.
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Swingman wrote: ...

Me, too... :)
Now back to--I'm <supposed> to be doing year-end books but having a terrible hard time keeping myself on track... :(
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wrote:

Near a little town called Hudson -- it's about 30 miles north of Denver, 30 miles East of Boulder and 30 miles southeast of Greeley. My dad grew up near Flagler, that's *way* eastern Colorado.
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Mark & Juanita wrote:

OK, yeah, it's starting to get out there, but it's still quite a way to Burlington...
Farther north than we are, so don't get that far north when we go to Denver usually...we cut off at Limon and head on down to Kit Carson...
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Duane Bozarth wrote:

True. I was going to mention that earlier this morning, but didn't quite work it in. As a truck driver I see this quite often. There's a line on the road. One side is bright and sunny, and the other is a deluge, like driving straight into a wall of water. Or the reverse too. It's not terribly rare at all.
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On Mon, 27 Dec 2004 14:06:19 -0500, Silvan

That happened to me in New Mexico a few years back. It was hot and dry (100+) when all of a sudden I drove under a thunderhead and had to hit the wipers on FULL SPEED for about 3 blocks, then all was dry as a bone for the next 100 miles. I had just bypassed Deming and was heading up the S-26 shortcut to I-25 north when it hit, right between Florida and Nutt. A raven was flying down the street toward me about 10' above the white line and just after it passed me, the wall of water hit me. I could see the cloud shadow on the ground but couldn't see the rain until I was in it. Weird things like that are hard to forget. I never figured out what it was trying to tell me but I slowed down a whole lot that day. <insert TwiZo music here>
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Larry Jaques wrote:

I've seen that too. It's really cool, like one of those cartoons where the single rain cloud is following someone around.
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"Silvan" wrote in message

When we were kids they had a saying when you saw the phenomenon of rain on one side of the street, and sunshine on the other:
"The devil is chasing his wife around a stump with a broomstick".
Hadn't thought of that in years ... wonder where it came from?
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Used to see that years ago when traveling to AZ. Going through TX & NM you could see for miles and watch those thunderstorms go across the highway miles ahead of you. By the time you got there, the road was wet for a mile or two, then back to dry road again. Once we saw where some unfortunate slid off the road into a 6' deep ditch, then kept driving down the ditch for about 3mi trying to find a way out until they got stopped at a crossing. Only way they were going to get out was a tow.
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More common where the rain is a result of sudden downdraft from storms, versus frontal activity, which spreads for miles. I imagine everyone has experienced the sudden cooling prior to a thunderstorm, and many of those who fly have felt low altitude microbursts. Lot of airports are putting in Doppler now to warn aircraft close to the ground of their potential for becoming part of it.
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