Snowing in Houson

Page 3 of 4  
calmly ranted:

TWO FEET? Oy vay, Yack. What a white Christmas! Mario's always complaining about Buffalo getting a bad rap, but I continue to hear amazing things like that (and the 5' one week a couple years ago, etc.) Methinks -he- is in denial. ;)
We were supposed to get snow but it has been 37 rain so far today. Siskiyou Pass is blanketed in white, though. <http://www.tripcheck.com/roadcams/customcamdetail.asp?Name=Larry%27s%20Map&Num=2&cam1 &cam2t>

Nappy Hoo Year to you, too.
P.S: Got JPGs?
------------------------------------------------------------- * * Humorous T-shirts Online * Norm's Got Strings * Wondrous Website Design * * http://www.diversify.com -------------------------------------------------------------
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Larry Jaques wrote:

Lake effect snows are funny. The snow may have missed Mario's area. I know that about 5 miles to the south of me they only got 2"-3". The official measurement at the Buffalo airport, about 10 miles east of the lake was 11".

<http://www.tripcheck.com/roadcams/customcamdetail.asp?Name=Larry%27s%20Map&Num=2&cam1 &cam2t>
Looks familiar although during the worse of Friday evenings storm I has to stop snow blowing as I couldn't see the front of the snow blower. Fortunately it was the light fluffy stuff and I was able to clear most of it out in about an hour after the snow stopped.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Nova" writes:

Tell me about it.
The official reporting point for Cleveland is Hopkins Airport on the west side of the city.
Average yearly snow fall is less than 6 ft.
20 miles east in Chardon, Oh, heart of the snow belt, 10+ ft is the normal.

My local salesman for the Western New York area lived in Buffalo and worked out of his house.
At least once or twice a year he would be up on his roof shoveling off snow when I would call.
Ah the memories.
Today, I wait for a winter storm to come in off the Pacific and dump a bunch of rain on SoCal.
Really screws up my fiberglass laying work.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lew Hodgett wrote:

[snip]
At least one forecaster says we should get a couple feet of snow up here. Gonna meet a daughter at a restaurant in Orange County for lunch tomorrow. The snow is supposed to hold off till evening.     mahalo,     jo4hn
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
calmly ranted:

Yeah, my buddy Terry used to drive from NYC to Canuckistan and went through there. Serveral times he stopped and stood in the sunshine a few yards from a blowing snowstorm, as if there were a wall there and the storm was contained behind it. Damndest thing he ever saw.
------------------------------------------------- - Boldly going - * Wondrous Website Design - nowhere. - * http://www.diversify.com -------------------------------------------------
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Larry Jaques wrote:

I've seen that too, here in Virginia. Almost like there's some kind of invisible forcefield keeping the white stuff on the other side of the line. Very weird.
We get weather like that especially in late spring.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 27 Dec 2004 01:40:04 -0500, Silvan

Ditto on Little Rock AFB in the 60s. I'd be on one side of the street in the sunshine while it rained like hell (80F summer rain) on the other side of the street, and I could watch the line of wetness progress slowly toward me. Great stuff for an 8-year-old.
------------------------------------------------- - Boldly going - * Wondrous Website Design - nowhere. - * http://www.diversify.com -------------------------------------------------
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Larry Jaques wrote:

My brother and I used to complain that Dad would <always> get rained out and we would both have to stay out in the field all day...did seem like that, often, although I'm sure there were instances the other way as well we selectively forgot! :)
It's a general phenomenon, of course...the precipitation line has to be <somewhere>...it just is most often not where we happen to be standing.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 27 Dec 2004 08:50:25 -0600, Duane Bozarth wrote:

except in Seattle where it rains everywhere, and heavier in the convergence zone...
- Doug
--

To escape criticism--do nothing, say nothing, be nothing." (Elbert Hubbard)


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug Winterburn wrote:

It still stops <somewhere>... :)
Spent 10 days w/ daughter in Olympia couple of weeks ago now...saw the sun once while there for about 30 minutes... :(
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 27 Dec 2004 09:09:10 -0600, Duane Bozarth

Doesn't the Olympic Rainforest get something like 240 inches annually? Amazing!
------------------------------------------------- - Boldly going - * Wondrous Website Design - nowhere. - * http://www.diversify.com -------------------------------------------------
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 27 Dec 2004 09:35:48 -0800, Larry Jaques wrote:

The Olympic mountains are what creates the convergence zone. The Pacific weather moves in and hits the Olympics giving the amazing rainfall there. The mountains also force weather north and south heading east, and this weather "converges", usually somewhere from north Seattle to Everett to give that "enhanced" rainfall.
- Doug
--

To escape criticism--do nothing, say nothing, be nothing." (Elbert Hubbard)


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yep, the reason for the abundant rainfall is the elevation and cooling of moisture-laden air - can't be colder than the dewpoint without raining - by the mountains. Spills into the gaps with enhancement.
Then there's the rain shadow on the other side extending through the intermountain region.
We get 240 inches per year too, but it's snow. The areas of squalls south of the lake (Superior) are easily predicted by the direction and velocity of the wind, and influenced by the lay of the land.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 27 Dec 2004 18:24:22 -0500, George wrote:

True - Sequim (pronounced squim), a little town on the northeast side of the Olympic peninsula is in the shadow (aka banana belt), and get about one third of the rainfall as Seattle.
- Doug
--

To escape criticism--do nothing, say nothing, be nothing." (Elbert Hubbard)


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 27 Dec 2004 10:49:30 -0700, Doug Winterburn

And that's precisely why I'll always prefer to live on the leeward side of any mountains in the area. It's more sunny and a lot drier.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - If God approved of nudity, we all would have been born naked. ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- http://www.diversify.com Your Wild & Woody Website Wonk
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 27 Dec 2004 19:21:19 -0800, Larry Jaques wrote:

Depends on how close to the mountains you are on the leeward side. Get a little too far away, and you are in the convergence zone. Of course, this only applies to a lump of mountains like the Olympics, not a wall like the Rockies - unless you are behind a *BIG* lump :-)
- Doug
--

To escape criticism--do nothing, say nothing, be nothing." (Elbert Hubbard)


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 27 Dec 2004 20:38:52 -0700, Doug Winterburn

This lovely portion of the Rogue River Valley gets 32 inches annually. We're leeward of the Coastal Range, nestled between them and the Cascade Range.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - If God approved of nudity, we all would have been born naked. ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- http://www.diversify.com Your Wild & Woody Website Wonk
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Larry Jaques wrote: ...

Don't know the precisely although the Time/Life series of US geographical areas says about 150" (the bookshelf happens to be right over there... :) ). Let's see if the Smoky Mountains is given...I'm thinking it's in the 85-inch neighborhood if I recall correctly...no, that's not given there although some of the top elevations also qualify as temperate rain forest (although not in spades like Olympic).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

While the precipitation line must be somewhere, it is usually not as abrupt, more of a gradual tapering off from rain to drizzle to mist. The sharp demarcation of rain/dry is what is interesting.
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ Now we'll just use some glue to hold things in place until the brads dry +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mark & Juanita wrote: ...

I know, I spent 30 years in VA/TN where it does rain more generally like that...I suppose, though, that for those of us who are in the western states where virtually all of our rainfall is thunderstorm-type and where we can see for long distances, the phenomenon is so common as to be expected rather than the unexpected...
I recall one time as a kid sitting in the dining room at noon while it rained out the west windows and was dry on the east side--took several minutes for it to move the other fifteen feet or so required to get to the other side of the house, too. Usually things aren't that slow-moving around here, but that particular storm was.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.