Snipe

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Im getting snipe on both ends of my boards. I can lessen the snipe on the back end if I lift up on the board as it comes out of the planer. Does this mean my tables are too low? Too High? Or am I just a moron? Ive tried everything.
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Causes of snipe:
1. Board tilts up/down as it enters/leaves the feed rollers.
2. Cutterhead tilts up/down as wood enters/leaves the feed rollers.
I mounted my planer on a table and added infeed/outfeed rollers, seems to help somewhat. Greasing the pillars on the head seems to reduce head tilt a little. Other than that, you'll have to experiment and see what works for you.
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UTRECHT wrote...

It means that either the board or the carriage (the part with the cutter head and rollers) shifts too much when only one roller is in contact with the work. It can be caused by a number of things, including the tables being too low, or tilting down away from the cutter head.

What kind of planer do you have? Does it have a carriage or cutter head lock, and if so, do you notice any difference when using it?
You can reduce the effect of table adjustments by using an auxiliary bed, easily made from a piece of melamine.
Jim
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Snipe is a "cost of doing business", plane your boards first then cut to length.
--
Rumpty

Radial Arm Saw Forum: http://forums.delphiforums.com/woodbutcher/start
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I'd disagree with that. (Unless you own a "sniper" planer; OR don't know how to prevent snipe by adjustment and feed techniques). One of the easiest way to prevent snipe is feed one boards in sequentially, but overlapping a bit so that the planer sees a continuous length of boards. The only part that could have snipe would be the leading end of the first board and the trailing end of the last board. As long as the boards are less than 1/2 the width of the planer that's an option.
I just don't believe that it is a "cost of doing business".
dave
Rumpty wrote:

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I agree with you that is another great way of preventing snip Dave.

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Everything?
Can you reduce the downward pressure exerted by the feed rollers?
How old is this unknown planer?
John
UTRECHT wrote:

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Snipe is caused by improperly adjusted infeed and or out feed roller height and / or pressure. Start by adjusting the bed rollers just a hair above the planer bed. Use a good straight edge to run between the infeed and out feed rollers on the bed to about 0.001" to 0.003" above the bed. Make sure it is even across all planes of the bed. Then adjust your infeed power roller so that it grabs the board but it will not slip if you feel the board kick up on the back side you bed roller is to high. Then adjust your out feed power roller in the same fashion. Also do use some type of support on both sides of your planner level with your bed if your stock is any longer that 48". This should all but eliminate any snipping.

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I agree with Rumpty, price of doing business. Unless you spend countless hours on set up every time. If your using a portable planer there are a few tricks to try. I have a planer sled that I have had success with for some pieces but that only works once in a while. Rest of the time I know I have "X" amount of waste in any job and don't fret about it. Lifes to short to nit-pic some waste.
EJ

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Thanks for telling me it ain't something I can control on my Delta 13" portable which has always sniped the hell out of stuff right out of the box and no relief after agonizing hours of fooling with leveling screws on the cheap stamped metal tables. That in spite of the big selling feature about locking head mechanism.
Not one to give up easily though, so when time permits I'll follow the instructions for the outfeed roller adjustment. They want a BIG piece of hardwood and I'll have to check the woodpile for a piece that will give me a 4"x4" chunk to machine to their specs and I'll go from there.

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...

box
I have that planer and rarely see any snipe. When I do, it is because I did not support a piece as it exits. What length boards are you putting through? The loner ones are in need of support. When I do some short ones (say 18" or less), I have never seen any snipe.
It is still good practice to oversize the boards and leave some to trim off the ends. Easy to say, but when you have a 20" hunk of wood and need two 9 1/2 inchers, there is little room for error. Ed snipped-for-privacy@snet.net http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
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wrote:

Ed, have you tried laying longer pieces of scrap on each side of your short workpiece and running the three through together? By the time the scrap gets sniped, the good piece is safely through the cutters. Ripped-down $3 tubafors are perfect for it, and darned cheap insurance.
Michael
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"Michael Baglio @nc.rr.com>" <mbaglio<NOSPAM> wrote in message

I've often run pieces butted end to end, but never thought about the scrap idea. I'll have to give it a try. Ed
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Or butt up and run pieces of scrape in front and behind the good wood
John
On Sat, 21 Feb 2004 15:21:29 GMT, Michael Baglio

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Try over sizing your stock in length. Makes all the snipe go away.
UA100
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scribbled:

Yabbut then we get yet another thread on what to do with scraps.
Luigi Replace "nonet" with "yukonomics" for real email address
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Luigi Zanasi wrote:

Piss on them and chuck them in the garden compost.
UA100
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Bbut, if your diet is high in vegetable oils will it cause spontaneous combustion? If you have sawdust in the compost will it cause a dust explosion? Enquiring minds you know...
And, and, what if there is Yew in the scrap heap - will it smell "pee yew"?
<pauses for breath>
time to go methinks
--

Greg

"Life isn't like a box of chocolates...it's more like a jar of
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Drive a rod into the ground so the compost is grounded and run a bare copper wire around it. . Just don't pee on the grounding wire during a lightening storm or it could hurt.
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scribbled:

No, no, no! Pay attention! That's what to do with your *sawdust*, not your scraps! Scraps take too long to compost. How many times do I have to repeat it?
I just discovered a use for planer shavings. A friend came over today to use my planer on a bunch of spruce and pine he cut on his property. Somebody with a Woodmiser milled it for him and he asked to use my planer. A soon-to-be grandfather, you will never guess what he will make with it (the wood, not the planer). That's right, a hope chest for his daughter.(1)
Anyway, to make a short story even longer, as he was cleaning up, he asked me if I composted the shavings. I told I put them out for the city's compost pick-up. He said he could use it as firestarter. I told him that my experience with planer shavings is that they did not burn too well. I tried putting them directly on the fire. If you put too few, they just immediately flare up. Too many, and they just sit these and smolder until the fire goes out. Then you still have a pile of (partially burnt) shavings to dispose of. I also tried putting them in paper grocery bags and then burning the bag in a stove or fireplace, but the same thing happened.
What he does is to pour diesel fuel or kerosene on the shavings so that it is absorbed. He keeps it in plastic bags. When he needs to start a fire in his woodstove, he puts a small quantity of the shavings in the stove and lights it. Bingo!
Luigi Replace "nonet" with "yukonomics" for real email address
(1) He had promised her a hope chest many years ago and is finally getting rountuit. Bill is building a cradle too, as behooves any grandfather. He is planning to finish it with shellac. When I told him that it shellac edible as it is made from bug secretions (just like honey) and that it was used to coat Smarties (M&Ms, Keith), it reinforced his decision.
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