smooth 45 degree cuts on TS


I have been cutting some oak with a Delta unisaw and the blade set to 45 degrees. The edges don't seem real smooth at 45 degrees but are smooth as glass at 90 degree. I'm using a WWII which is about a month old. The cuts are along the grain and seem to be tearing along the wood fibers. The poplar wood I was using before seemed very smooth at 45 degrees. Any suggestions. Thanks
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Could your crosscut, then rip to width afterwards? That would remove the splintered end. I've got no clue as to why that would happen at 45 but not at 90.
Keith wrote:

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Keith wrote:

that would lose the blade alignment when the blade was tilted. Below is a "Google" link to some of those past threads. It's a long URL so if it doesn't work for you try an "Advanced Google Search" for "+Delta +tilt +alignment" (without the quotes).
http://groups-beta.google.com/groups?as_q=%2Bdelta+%2Btilt+%2Balignment&num &scoring=r&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&as_epq=&as_oq=&as_eq=&as_ugroup=rec.woodworking&as_usubject=&as_uauthors=&lr=&as_drrb=q&as_qdr=&as_mind=1&as_minm=1&as_miny81&as_maxd&as_maxm=3&as_maxy 05&safe=off
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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wrote:

If I'm following you here, your are ripping at a 45 degree angle? I think a clue might be that the poplar is coming out okay. Just a guess would be that your blade may be more dull than you think.
Mike O.
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Depends on what's going on. Are you seeing blade artifact - arcs from the teeth and maybe a bit of burn? Might be what Jack said.
If it's just random roughness, see Mike. Remember your board is now 1.4 times as thick, so adjust your feed and hold accordingly.
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I'll try a Freud blade I have that is almost new and see. The links may help also as I only have been checking the angle measurement.
Should I leave more then one saw tooth above the board on the cut? Thanks

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I've seen a similar problem with contractor's saws, I guess it could happen with a cabinet saw as well. If the plane of the saw table is not parallel to the tilt axis of the blade, then tilting the blade will effectively move the front of the blade closer or further from the miter slot than the rear, whether closer or further depending on which way it is "out" If this is the case than I believe it could be corrected with shims between the cabinet and the front or rear of the table. (On a contractors saw shims are used between the trunnions and the table) Perhaps someone else has a good procedure for doing this, at the moment all I can think of is a trial and error solution.
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Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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Keith, Is the blade tilting away from the fence? Is so, the wood will tend to rise and fall producing a rough cut. Regardless of tilt you need to maintain good downward pressure and good pressure against the fence you will produce better rips. Tilting toward the fence will make this job a touch easier.
Dave
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wrote:

You are ripping not cross cutting..if I read you post correctly... Now I would expect your 1 month old WW!! blade is not yet very dull so I am going to rule that out....
You seem to indicate that the fibers are sheared and not smoothly cut off along the entire surface of the cut..not just sheared or splintered along the edge of the cut... so we can rule out left vs right hand tilt saws...(lol..had to bring that up even thought I mainly use a right tilt and increase the lightly hood of splintering on the "good side of a ripped miter)...
My guess is that when you tilt the blade you actually loose alignment of the blade to the miter slot...the rear of your blade shifts a little closer or further away from the slot ..at a 90 degree angle everything is in alignment. front to back...
Just my Guesses...
Bob Griffiths
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<snip>

And my guess, since it's oak, is that it's changing the grain direction, exposing the more open pore structure, and generally being oak. Probably red oak, too. Consider the ray fleck structure that's variably exposed, when changing from flatsawn to riftsawn to quartersawn, and my money's on that being a contributing factor.
Oh, and try using featherboards, if you haven't already.
So that's my guess from miles away.
Patriarch
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You are right it is right oak. Nice call.

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Well I cleaned the WWII and have been using more downward pressure as suggested and it did start producing a cleaner cut. My saw is a left tilt which it seems allows it to move up and down as suggested. Either way I want to thank everyone for their help.

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