Small built-in cabinet project ... in progress.

Page 1 of 2  
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopBuiltInWallCabinets2014?noredirect=1#
Nothing fancy, challenging or out of the ordinary, just the photo link I use to keep the client updated on the progress of their project.
The client wants things as "plain as can be ... no round overs, no profiles, just broken edges and rectangles". No problem.
Good news is that so far the weather here has been such as to make working in the shop an absolutely pleasant experience.
Enjoying it while I can ...
--
eWoodShop: www.eWoodShop.com
Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/15/2014 9:12 AM, Swingman wrote:

"Challenging" is relative, of course. I built something similar and managed to find a challenge in it.
I'm curious about the lower cabinets. Why the gap in the top? I see that there will be another piece on top that will cover it, but is it simply a matter of saving wood? Weight?
--
This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection is active.
http://www.avast.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/15/2014 10:38 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

Wood and Weight savings is correct. You might be surprised how often you have to buy another sheet of plywood in order to make the top solid. When the top does not have to be solid, scrap pieces can often be used. I very often will do the same and just as often redraw the top pieces narrower in the drawing so that my optimization program, that tells me how much material to buy, will suggest one less sheet of material. Making a piece an inch narrower, when it does not matter can often saver you $75~$120 in materials.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The top strips in the two side cabinets, besides being structural, have two functions:
Being the same as, and batch cut to dimension with the floor, they provide support while keep the end panels parallel; and they are used to attach the 1 1/2" thick counter top (3/4" thick substrate plus 3/4" thick birch ply top).
The Bench Seat cabinet was not deigned that way since it needed a partition, and extra strength to hold two or three sitting adults.
--
www.ewoodshop.com (Mobile)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And that also.
--
www.ewoodshop.com (Mobile)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/15/2014 11:40 AM, Swingman wrote:

LOL! ;~) Uh Huh....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Karl ...
How are you treating the plywood edges?
Larry
On Thursday, May 15, 2014 8:12:18 AM UTC-5, Swingman wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/15/2014 4:57 PM, Gramps' shop wrote:

Background: The client does not want FF cabinets, and wants a "simple Euro" frameless look.
"Simple" is an oxymoron here.
Frameless cabinetry is much less forgiving and more difficult to accomplish in a "shop built", "built-in" installation than faceframe cabinetry.
That is, unless you take the shortcut of actually building the cabinetry onto the walls, a method to which I do not subscribe, for lasting work in today's poorly built homes.
So, to answer your question: 3/4"T x 3/4"W birch hardwood "edge banding" on visible horizontal edges; and 3/4"T x 1"W on vertical edges.
Normally I would just use glue-on the ubiquitous birch edge banding, but you need to have some thickness available to scribe to non plumb/square walls if you are forbidden to use trim to cover up and gaps.
(this extremely particular client forbids anything that looks like "trim") ;)
If you look you can see the 3/4" "edge banding" idea expressed in the photos of each cabinet.
They also want any vertical end panels that are visible to be 1" wide, and all the horizontal components (shelves, etc) to be 3/4" thick; except for the counter tops and bench seat, which are spec'ed for 1 1/2" thickness.
Since the way you usually get that 1" thick look with 3/4" material is with FF's, a bit of trickery is involved.
Since the cabinet boxes and shelve must be attached to the walls on each end of the run, I'm using 1 1/4" wide hardwood material to give me the spec'ed 1" width on the outside stiles, which will be against the walls, plus a little extra to allow scribing to the walls.
The outside "stiles"/end panels on the shelf unit must be a flush 1", with NO overhang.
This is actually a good thing, because it lets me make the two outside end panels out of 3/4" material, than "face" those two panels on the outside with 1/4" material that can be applied after installation, giving me the added ability to scribe that 1/4" T "face" panel to the back wall to cover any gaps there.
That visible plywood edge of the combined panels will then be covered with said 3/4" x 1" birch hardwood "edge banding".
(walls have been measured and are neither square nor plumb, there is approx 3/8" variance in the distance between the side walls from top to bottom - 114 3/4" to 114 3/8", and back wall is 1/4" out of plumb from top to bottom)
More than you wanted to know, but one thing leads to another, explanation. ;)
--
eWoodShop: www.eWoodShop.com
Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopBuiltInWallCabinets2014?noredirect=1
Leon (on the ladder) came by this week specifically to pity an old man, and help get these two tall shelf units from the shop, to atop the base cabinets and screwed in place ... although I'm not sure, judging from where that drill is pointing, whether he got the right idea? ;)
Got the stiles (and end panels) scribed _perfectly_ to three of the most crooked, non-plumb walls I've ever experienced, on a job where NO scribe moulding is allowed ... still trying to figure out how/why I let myself in for these things.
The finisher is there as we speak this morning. Here's hoping the color match of the top coat pleases the client. I'll know by day's end...
--
eWoodShop: www.eWoodShop.com
Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Saturday, July 12, 2014 10:52:38 AM UTC-5, Swingman wrote:

OK, where no scribe molding is allowed, how did you do it? The only way I have done that in the past is to build a base, plumb a tall board on a leve l base, then scribe the offending edge's profile onto it. Then transfer ov er to the actual stile to hand cut with a saw. It was long and laborious to do.
Inquiring minds, Karl... do tell.

Good luck! I like the symmetry and spacing around that window. It has a " looks like it belongs there" look to it. Great job as usual.
BTW, you might want to check that ladder in the last pic. It looks like Ba yer was eyeballing it to "mark" as his...
I was serious about transferring the wall profile to your cabinet edge. So metimes I think I make things harder than they need to be, so I am always r eady to learn something new.
Robert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/12/2014 11:36 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Nothing new, just an old skill/method that still occasionally comes in handy in the "Caulk Age".
All wall end stiles (both cabinet and shelf unit, wall end stiles) were made and fit to the cabinets before sanding, but only attached temporarily with double sided tape, sanded and then stained. Not to be permanently attached to cabinets until properly scribed to the wall during installation.
I got lucky with the two base cabinet 'wall end' stiles.
Although with a 3/16" gap at the top, their walls were flat (not plumb), lower down, so simply angled straight cuts, using the Festool TS-75 and guide rails, sufficed for a perfect fit to the wall.
Not so with the 74" tall shelf units.
Both walls, higher up, had 3/8" - 1/2" gaps at the top (one with a 3/8" gap at the bottom as well) and the walls were wavy/buckled (to a 1/4") in a couple of places on the way up.
The right stile, although wavy, was an old fashioned straightforward, steady hand/eye, Bosch jig saw scribe job; with just a couple of 1/4" bump outs, but was flush to the wall at the bottom.
The left wall was a different story.
That stile only touched the wall for a total of 18", starting about 12" up. There were two 3/16" bumps in the first 12", then flush to the wall for 18", then a gap, with two 1/4" bump outs, increasing to 1/2" gap at the 74" high top.
IOW, the farkin' proverbial wall from hell cabinetmaker's nightmare, +10.
For this one I had to make a template out of 1/4" material because, if the above was not enough to cause angst, there was not enough of a wall surface to run even a compass scribe along its length, due to the proximity of the rounded corner of the drywall, all the while holding the 3/4" thick material in place.
Made a couple of test wall scribes in strips of the 1/4" plywood, cut out with the jig saw, until I got a perfect scribe cut.
Then carefully transferred that scribe to the real stile; shut out all distractions; bit the bullet and squeezed the nuts; fired up the jig saw; and made the jig saw cut with the greatest degree of carefularity... in the last piece of stock.
... then prayed all the way back to the jobsite.
It worked. ;)
Used the same method to scribe the pre-finished plywood end panels to the back walls, but without the drama.
BTW, I started using these a few years back.
https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/bnB34Fmc1cy26B7yjIPJdtMTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=directlink
The little one (yellow/green??) is my favorite goto scribe tool (I'm on my second of both as they somehow walk off by themselves). For most scribes you can just use the edge that corresponds to your biggest gap and be done with it.
The Fastcap works for more challenging situations, like the last above.
In short, way too much work for the average bear in today's world, but worth being able to do, if nothing else but for the satisfaction of being able to git'r done WITHOUT caulk and trim ... imagine that. ;)
--
eWoodShop: www.eWoodShop.com
Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That your ladder or his? It looks like one of those Little Giant ladder types. I was wondering what your opinion was of that type of ladder?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/12/2014 2:52 PM, snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote:

His but I have 2 plus one that extends the same but is strictly A frame style and has a platform to stand on 2 steps from the top.
Yes I bought one again and again, so to speak.
The thing to watch out for if you don't buy a Wing Little Giant ladder is the hinge at the top/middle when in a straight position. Some of the other brand hinge locks are TERRIBLE and a PIA to operate. Gorilla, a HD knock off of the Little Giant, has basically the same hinge lock as the Little Giant. You simply push on a knob on both sides and the hinge is unlocked. It relocks automatically as the next latch position is reached. The Gorilla some times does not automatically lock each time, not a problem if you are paying attention, you can easily manually engage the lock and once locked you are safe. I would steer clear of the lever actuated locks all together.
The Little Giant A frame ladder, I keep this one in the house for changing the A/C filter, the filter is on the ceiling 11 feet up.
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Little-Giant-Ladder-6-ft-10-ft-Aluminum-Select-Step-Multi-Position-Ladder-with-300-lb-Load-Capacity-Type-IA-Duty-Rating-15109-001/202708448
Compared to most all less expensive standard ladders these type ladders are certainly heavier but absolutely much more stable.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/12/2014 2:52 PM, snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote:

It's an early "Cosco" ... a ripoff of the Little Giant.
Had it for years and I like it because it is safe to use due to the many different positions in which it can be configured, for stairs, etc.
One can stand, straddling the apex, with a foot on each side on a top rung, and be very steady without being that high off the ground. Almost like being on a platform because of the wide rungs.
Downside is that it was heavy to start with, and gets heavier each year.
Don't know if they make them this well built any longer, but you can usually find the newer versions at the Borgs for less than $200.
--
eWoodShop: www.eWoodShop.com
Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/12/2014 6:16 PM, Swingman wrote:

Some things appreciate in weight even quicker. I find that my music gear (keyboard, amp, stand etc.) gets substantially heavier between the beginning of the gig and the end.
--
This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection is active.
http://www.avast.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/12/2014 10:52 AM, Swingman wrote:

DAMN nice!
The French model is brutally handsome too. NO NOT THE DOG ;~)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I DO hope you priced it accordingly :)

It certainly should but if it doesn't? I hope he/she is a warm fuzzy, not a cold prickly.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Swingman" wrote:

Pretty soon you will make an executive decision to assign "ladder work" to younger members of your staff.
Don't have other staff, you probably don't do ladder work any more.
Trust me.
Lew
--
This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection is active.
http://www.avast.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/12/2014 6:36 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

I don't it now without adult supervision. ;)
--
eWoodShop: www.eWoodShop.com
Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Don't know what color this is, but I don't need the color to see the 3D (chaytoyance?) effect of the finish:
https://www.flickr.com/gp/karlcaillouet/y1bfsj
The stain is two to three coats of a custom color, and the topcoat is NC lacquer tinted with a toner to make it darker.
For stained birch plywood with birch banding, I kinda like it...
--
eWoodShop: www.eWoodShop.com
Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.