Sloped/Angle routing?

The problem: Creating, for example, angled dados and rabbets or other decorative grooves, with the router.
Yes, I know that angled dados and rabbets can be done with table and radial arm saws, but I'm looking for something much more general. Perhaps an edge beading that rises from the bottom to the top of an edge of a board.
Things I've already tried:
1. Attaching an appropriate shim to the bottom of the piece and then run it across the router table
2. Attaching a shim to the sub-base plate of the router before routing a piece.
Any other techniques, jigs, etc?
TIA Norm
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Norm Dresner wrote:

http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/Projects/JBot /
(second photo from bottom) and also something like
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/Projects/Bevel /
Easy! :-]
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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Eat your heart out, Morris
http://www.krtwood.com/disher.html
I'll trade you, straight up ;)
For the OP: You can do a lot with the right jig, but usually they need to be special made for the task. Might be some ideas there for you. I would highly not recommend the t-nut knobs though :)
-Kevin
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Kevin wrote:

That's pretty cool!

Well, it's not /that/ cool - and I suspect that you'd have altogether /too/ much fun with a shop-built CNC machine. :)

I found it interesting that Kevin and I both used the same inexpensive trim router. :)
I think the trick is to dispense with the factory base and build one of your own to hold the router at an angle while you guide it (perhaps against a fence clamped to the workpiece) by hand.
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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I'm definitely intrigued with the possibilities. Though at the same time I like to make things up as I go along, I think involving a CNC would require more forethought and planning than how I like to work.

Not only is it inexpensive, but it includes the most wonderful aroma. You just can't put a price on that, it nearly brought tears to my eyes.
-Kevin
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snipped-for-privacy@YAHOO.COM wrote:

It does that - I enjoy producing the concept and imagining how something can be made, and I (usually) enjoy the thing made - but as time passes I'm coming to enjoy the making part less and less.
'Twas fun, tho, to mull through the geometry of cutting your bowl in a single spiral pass with a round-nosed bit...

LOL They were on sale for $19.95 when I went for mine. I figured that at that price I'd buy a second for when the first died...
...and thereby assured that the first will outlast me. The upside to the CNC is that I don't have to get up close and personal with the the thing - from 5 or 10 feet upwind it doesn't smell at all. :)
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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