Slightly OT - kniFe sharpening

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I practice scary sharp on my chisels and planes, and even have sharpened my handsaws, but I don't know how to sharpen our kitchen knives.
So I am thinking of buying a sharpener - one of those automatic sharpeners. I have heard that they are mostly crap. However since sharpening is mostly a matter of putting a consistant angle on the blade it should be very well suited to a mechanical sharpener.
There are some electic diamond wheel sharpeners that sharpen in 2 or 3 stages. Anyone have any experience with any of these?
Please don't suggest that I learn to sharpen them by hand. It doesn't work. It's not a matter of technique it is more a matter of motivation. It just doesn't get done. The knives sit there dull and SWMBO complains about it. I need a quick, simple sharpener that I can run the knives through quickly when they are dull.
Thanks,
-Chris
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snipped-for-privacy@mybluelight.com (Chris) wrote:

OK, I won't suggest that. Even if it *is* the best way to get them sharp. :-)

electric can opener. Or buy a can opener that has one. It's not a very good way to sharpen knives, but it's a darn sight better than leaving them dull. If you strop them with an old belt afterward, you can get a decent edge.
We sharpen ours on the Tormek grinder in the workshop, and hone them occasionally with the ceramic hone that came with my fish-filleting knife.
-- Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
How come we choose from just two people to run for president and 50 for Miss America?
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote in message
http://www.SoundInMotionDJ.com
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On 16 Dec 2003 11:57:57 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Stan Graves) wrote:

I disagree. maintaining a constant angle is unnecessary on most tools and just about irrelevant with kitchen cutlery. even with woodworking tools, if you are within a few degrees (handwork tolerances) and do not exceed a critical angle (more degrees than the frog angle of a plane, for instance) the tool will work just fine. the time used setting up a jig is better used elsewhere almost every time. I say this as a 39 year old guy who has been working with sharp tools (and sharpening them) since I was 8 or 10.
of course, YMMV

you mean by hand or with an angle controlling device? ; ^ )

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On 16 Dec 2003 07:27:58 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@mybluelight.com (Chris) wrote:

Chris-
a sharpening steel is a very quick way to keep an edge on kitchen knives. if they are very dull you'll need to do something more agressive, but for the most part a file works great for that.
yes, there is some skill involved. not much, but some. it's worth it, though. the steel lives with the knives. I check the sharpness as part of the dish washing- the idea is that no knife gets put away dull, so they are ready to go when needed...     Bridger
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snipped-for-privacy@cox.net writes:
[...]

... but should not be used on laminated japanese knives, and some of the more fancy western knives (like ceramic or specially coated) might also get problems with them. Otherwise it's a *very* handy and quick thing, only a few strokes are needed at a time.
--
Dr. Juergen Hannappel http://lisa2.physik.uni-bonn.de/~hannappe
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@physik.uni-bonn.de Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869
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writes:

http://groups.google.com/groups?q=knife+FAQ+group:rec.crafts.metalworking&hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&group=rec.crafts.metalworking&selmPmifvsf2et707214eb6tg050ue4cnc2m5%404ax.com&rnum=1
Watch the word wrap. That's the Knife Sharpening FAQ in rec.crafts.metalworking. I learned a lot from it, and I consider myself kinda in the know on sharpening.
A word on steels...They don't actually *do* any sharpening. As the fine edge of the knife gets "folded over" the knife feels dull. The steel stands the edge back up again, for a little more use. When the edge actually gets dull, no amount of steeling is going to do you any real good.
-Phil Crow
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On 16 Dec 2003 16:55:15 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Phil Crow) wrote:
snip link to sharpening info

Phil- here's a little test you can do to confirm that your steel is (or isn't) removing metal. they aren't all the same, ya know, and most *do* remove some.
get a largeish sheet of white paper and some paper towels. clean your steel before you start. take a nice dull knife and holding it and the steel over the paper sharpen away at the knife. check yourself often, and don't be afraid of using a bit of pressure. sooner or later the knife will show signs of improving sharpness. then take a damp paper towel and wipe the steel. look for black marks on the towel- that's metal from the knife. now fold the paper and shake the filings down into the crease. that's also metal from the knife....     Bridger
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On 16 Dec 2003 16:55:15 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Phil Crow) wrote:

Having seen electron microscope pictures of knife edges both before and after steeling I think it is a lot more complex than just "standing the edge back up". The pictures seem to show metal being flowed back along the blade from the edge, if overdone it showed slabs of steel that were overlaying the sides of the blade and which would break off as soon as the knife was used, making it duller than when it started. I've used both smooth and serrated steels and the smooth ones seem to be prone to the over-steeling problem while the serrated ones remove metal from the edge so don't do the same thing. In short, a smooth steel is a completely different tool from a serrated one and does a similar job in a completely different way.
In most cases if 5-6 strokes on each side with the steel doesn't restore a razor edge you need to go back to the stone.
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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"Chris" writes:

IMHO, you are correct.

It is.

I don't.

OK, I won't.
Several years ago got a knife sharpening kit developed by a guy in his garage.
It is still available, but just not from him.
Found this link on Google.
Check out the "rod guided systems" section.
www.ameritech.net/users/knives/thankyou.htm
It works for me.
HTH
--
Lew

S/A: Challenge, The Bullet Proof Boat, (Under Construction in the Southland)
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On Tue, 16 Dec 2003 16:53:59 GMT, "Lew Hodgett"

Me too. The Lansky system is the one I use, after trying stones, belt sanders, the LVT guide. Coarse diamond stone to shape the angle, then though the coarse, medium and sometimes fine stones. Perfect edge you can shave with. The only problem is that the stones are pretty small for my big paws. A few licks with a steel keeps the edge good for a while. No, if only I could convince the LOML to use the f... steel!
Luigi Replace "no" with "yk" for real email address
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Greeting...
I too use a Lansky to sharpen my pocket knives, and I think it works very well, for the kitchen knives I use couple of long whetstones, followed but a ceramic rod, the results are pretty nifty, sharpening by hand is just being able to do the same thing over and over, much like using a jig, except your hands become the jig...and IMO it just takes practice...and patience...lots of that....but once you get it..it becomes much easier...
hope this helps...
DCH
suggested:

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oops I almost replied (G) well the chef's choice pro is not too bad. I used one till I wore it out. http://netincomeventures.oingo.com/apps/domainpark/results.cgi?cid=GOTO0544&domain_name=sharpening.com&sid 8b72afe7200000&pidI76&ac=r&s=knife%20sharpener
--
Knight-Toolworks & Custom Planes
Custom made wooden planes at reasonable prices
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snipped-for-privacy@mybluelight.com (Chris) wrote in

Chris,
For quick and simple, I found this for SWMBO last year:
http://www.fiskars.com/US/crafts/lookupItem.do?cat=1&itemNumber1849&fam=5
(watch for wrap). The item is Fiskars 'Roll Sharp Knife Sharpener', # 40127097
It was about $8 at a kitchen gadgets shop. This works really, really well -- you guide the knife blade through at 90 degrees; the wheel is 'canted' at the correct angle to get an edge.
Hope this helps.
Regards,
JT
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Check out the Lansky system. I've been using one for years and highly recommend it. It is not as fast as the motorized gizmos, but the resulting edge is far superior. In just a few minutes I can put a scary sharp edge on SWMBO's knives. The stones may look wimpy but it took me 10 years to wear out my first set.
Art

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scribbled

I did wear out (actually put a bow) in the coarse stone when I redid the angles on all the kitchen knives. I now use a diamond stone first for that reason. I haven't been able to flatten the coarse stone. Sandpaper just glazed it, no matter how coarse. The concrete floor didn't work either.
Other than that, it's a great system.
Luigi Replace "no" with "yk" for real email address
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I've found that for kitchen knives and even most general use pocket knives that a diamond steel followed by a few passes on a ceramic stick is the best way to get a shaving sharp edge. Usually about 4 or 5 passes on the diamond get the edge good and then the ceramic smoothes the roughness out of the edge.
Dean

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Yup, that's how I wear mine out. I put a dish in the middle of each stone. However I found that the cheap diamond hones from HF (#36799) level them right out. They do leave small scratches in the fine stone but it doesn't seem to affect it's ability to give a razor sharp edge.
Art

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scribbled

Gotta try that diamond hone trick, if I can still find to old coarse stone - I might have tossed it. The others (fine & medium) are in good shape as I only use them to hone the blade, rather than to shape the angle.
Luigi Replace "no" with "yk" for real email address
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DCH's post reminded me of something else.
Lanskys systems come with one Multi Angle Knife Clamp and it works great for short knives like paring knives. For the longer knives I bought a second clamp and use 2 when sharpening them.
Art

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