sliding product for jointer surface


What can be applied to the surface of my jointer in order to prevent the wood to grip to the surface other then the commercial products? Parrafine does not do a good job. Thanks.
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Commercial products like expensive spray specially made for table saws and jointers.

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Carol Dufour wrote:

You've already got good info. From a personal standpoint, I use Johnson's Paste Wax on all tool work surfaces. A can will last for waxing every surface you have for 20 or more years. The only problem I have, is that my work space is small so I have to move my table saw frequently. Stuff gets put on the table, and when I lift the rear about 3 degrees to move it, everything goes sliding off in front of the saw. It's not good for some measuring tools to hit the concrete floor, and stopping to up 5 or 6 boards is a pain.
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Paraffin is not a "slippery" was. I'd use a good paste wax.
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An old woodworker uses chalk (or talcum) on a black board eraser. The powder fills up the microscopic holes in the cast iron and not only does the metal not rust, it is very slick. max

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Carol Dufour wrote:

Not sure what you mean by "commercial"; Parrafin is a pretty commercial product (I have my doubts you made it at home). Paste wax works pretty well. For much "more commercial" product, Waxlit works very well.
PK
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rub the surfaces with a candle buffed in with baby powder in old sock or one of mama's nylons. Watch out, it's going to be slick.
(top posted for your convenience) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

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Carol Dufour asks:

the wood to grip to the surface other then the commercial products? Parrafine does not do a good job. <<
Paraffin alone is not going to work at all well. Look for Johnson's floor wax, Butcher's paste wax, Minwax wax, any hard furniture or floor wax that is silicone free. Or use Boeshield T9 or TopKote (grocery stores have the first two, woodworking supply houses have the last three).
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Here in the UK I use
A silicone spray...not expensive and very effective
Liberon lubricating wax
Cheers
Nicholas
--
Nicholas Buttle - Quality Joinery and Cabinet Making
http://www.nbjoinery.net
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Nicholas says...

The point is that silicone is the bane of finishing. It's like nuclear waste, it gets on everything and never completely goes away.
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Nicholas wrote:

Nyet! No! Nicht! No, No, No! Silly Cone and many finishes don't go together!
Waxilit, available from Lee Valley, is made specifically for what the questioner asked for. Comes in up to 55 gallone barrels for wood mills. Also keeps glue from sticking to wood and comes off with alcohol. On a cast iron table it leaves a very slippery surface, even "green" wood won't stick to it.
A little goes a long ways so don't order the 55 gallon drum.
charlie b
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When silicone attaches itself to the wood, (and everything else) it is very difficult to remove. I have had trouble driving after using silicone sealer at work. That is even after washing my hands with soap. Silicone on the wood will mess up a finish. max

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Charlie Self wrote:

One of those curiosities: I have no doubt that paraffin does not work well in this application, but it works exceedingly well on the soles of planes. Hmm. Is it just the application problem? It tends to self-apply on the sole of a plane.
PK
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Carol Dufour wrote:

I shave up paraffin wax with an old plane and dump it in a bottle of mineral spirits. Shake it every day until it is dissolved. I keep it in an old spray bottle. When it is sprayed on metal and wiped with a paper towel and dries it is slick and water resistant. I use it on my lathe ways, jointer and table saw. Also good in lathe chucks and vise screws as it doesn't attract dust. If the surface is dirty I apply it with a green abrasive pad, wipe the grungy stuff off and reapply as above.
--
Gerald Ross
Cochran, GA
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On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 11:47:58 -0200, "Carol Dufour"

I've had good results with paste wax (Johnson's, Liberon, Trewax, etc...), Bostich Topcote, CRC's version of Topcote.
Barry
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On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 11:47:58 -0200, "Carol Dufour"

    The solution that I've seen most often recommended is a paste wax (without silicone). Some say that furniture wax is preferable to auto wax.
    I recently ran across the web site of a model builder who thinks that he gets much more "mileage" out of "3m Ultra Performance Paste Wax." I haven't tried it, but the best price that I've seen is on it is at this site: http://www.eboatworks.com/ultra_performance_paste_wax.htm
There is also a spray on product called TopCote Table & Tool Surface Sealant, which carries the claim that "it is easy to apply and lasts longer than paste wax and it will not stain wood." Again, I haven't tried it but I've done a little checking and the best price that I've found so far is Lee Valley: http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p@952&cat=1,43415,43440&ap=1
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