Sliding Doors

I'm working on putting sliding doors on a work bench. I'll probably use masonite (hardboard) for the doors, and just make a couple grooves in a top and bottom rail for the doors to slide in. The doors will be a relatively good size, 40" tall by about 48" wide.
It looks like it's just a matter of cutting grooves, cutting the masonite to size, and drilling a few finger holes, right? Is there anything special I should do?
Are the panels going to be too heavy to just let them slide?
Puckdropper
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"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message

I've used sliding hardboard before. I suggest that they'd slide better if you put them in plastic track.
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Wax - good old fashioned wax is your friend. Plastic, wood or metal track does not matter.
good old fashioned wax blocks rubbed in the track and bottom of the drawer.
Doug
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Wax is great, except that it attracts and holds saw dust, which keeps you from being able to blow-out the dust with an air nozzle. I've found that a finely sanded/smooth surface is all you need to get Masonite sliding against wood. If the Masonite isn't "fuzzy" on the edges, and the grooves are sanded very smooth, it's like running in plastic.
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Paste wax for lubrication was my plan the whole time. Should I be looking for something else, though?
Puckdropper
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On 09 Feb 2009 18:35:33 GMT, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

...somebody already mentioned to check glass hardware, I've done a few glass door cabs and found a rail/wheel system that runs on tracks that is the bomb and would work with 1/4 hardboard. Kind've pricey, but trick. This is the outfit I deal with:
http://webservices.catalog-on-demand.com/webcatalogs/ebbrad/EBBradMaster /
(find sliding door hardware and go to aluminum track assembly). I dunno, though...you'd have to keep the tracks clean. Considering the size of the doors I see some binding if they bear completely on the sliding surface, if not right away down the road as things gum-up. Hey, you can always try the wax and then go to the tracks...I did some cabs for a hotel out here and used the Fibre Track, I believe you need 1/2" or bigger doors for that, though, but it was sweet...
cg
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"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message

Or just buy some kind of track for it to run in. I know that it is quite common for glass. Glass companies probably have this in stock. Or see what is at a wood workers store.
http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page "75&filter=sliding%20door%20tracks
http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?pageR37&filter=sliding%20door%20tracks
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Puckdropper wrote:

Are you saying that *each* door is to be 40" x 48"? In that case, yes, I think they would be too heavy to slide without MUCH effort. Even in a plastic track. Too flimsy too.
OTOH, if the 40x48 represents two doors, you might get away with it if you wax the door edges and grooves/track. Put the finger holes or pulls low so that you get "push" rather than "tip". If necessary, you could reduce friction by slightly beveling the leading 1/3 of the bottom edge so it doesn't contact the groove.
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Sorry, I don't agree. I've used it frequently in the past in a plastic track. It's hardboard, usually in various thicknesses from 1/8" to 1/4". With the sizes he wants to use the weight is mostly negligible even in a plastic sliding track. Nevertheless, there's metal track out there that also works fine.
The only problem I can see he might encounter is it bending or flexing due to sheer height and *that* may cause problems in any kind of track.
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wrote in message

If need be, I could drop the height down to ~20" or so, and make two sets of panels where there would only be one. 40" in height could be a bit much considering the flexibility of the hardboard.
I'm not committed to the materials, other than wanting something fairly smooth and paintable.
Puckdropper
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I have 36x40 inch doors on a cabinet in my shop and used roller skate ball bearings in the track of aluminum I bought at the borg. Jerry
http://community.webtv.net/awoodbutcher/MyWoodWorkingPage
http://community.webtv.net/awoodbutcher/1974Tryke
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