Sliding compound miter saws.

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Ok, at the risk of a severe flaming, what miter saw does everyone like? I'm leaning towards the Bosch 5412... don't hit me too hard. LOL!
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Steve Barker
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The ones under $200 with dual bevel and laser from CTC. It comes with a finger reattachment kit but not wit Saw-Stop for that price.
Get soft start and laser alignment, for sure. I don't think that unit has a laser cutting line. Once you try it you wouldn't be without one again.
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Ok, at the risk of a severe flaming, what miter saw does everyone like? I'm leaning towards the Bosch 5412... don't hit me too hard. LOL!
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On 1/24/2012 9:55 AM, m II wrote:

no, the laser went away when they discontinued the 5412L, it can be had separately as an add on, however.
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On 1/24/2012 9:37 AM, Steve Barker wrote:

If I were to buy another it would be a toss up between the Festool and the Bosch GCM12SD. This particular Bosch is only $164 more than the unit you are looking at, at Amazon.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)27427361&sr=1-1
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On 1/24/2012 11:51 AM, Leon wrote:

(Amazon.com product link shortened)27427361&sr=1-1 Ah yes, the articulating (not sliding) version. A very nice machine; that would probably be my choice if I were in the market.
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On 1/24/2012 11:51 AM, Leon wrote:

(Amazon.com product link shortened)27427361&sr=1-1
yeah, i saw that one at Lowes yesterday. hmmmmmm. tough decision. didn't really want to spend that much... I'm a novice woodworker, but using it for rough construction also. Anythin' will beat that old hitachi my dad gave me because someone else gave it to him. I think there's a reason it keeps getting given away. (i'll give it to my son) LOL!
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On 1/24/2012 2:14 PM, Steve Barker wrote:

The fact that it does not need space behind the saw for the sliding mechanism found on the sliders would be a big factor for me and it is creamy smooth.
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On Tue, 24 Jan 2012 14:14:39 -0600, Steve Barker

Obviously, it's a clandestine attempt to stop children from using your *good* tools. ~ Doesn't work anymore. Kids these days have an unusually developed sense of entitlement.
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I let my kids use all my tools... even the Lie-Nielson planes and saws in preference to the old Stanley and Millers Falls tools. It is not reasonable to expect kids to have good results with junk tools nor like working with tools that perform poorly. Taking it one step further I bought an L-N No 5 plane for them to use as they couldn't handle the No 7. Funny thing is that the No 5 has turned out to be the one most used by me!
John
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On Tue, 24 Jan 2012 17:47:29 -0500, "John Grossbohlin"

I can remember at 5 years of age, using my father's chisels to open paint cans. Needless to say, I destroyed more than one. But, my chiseling paint cans didn't last long. My father gave me my own set of chisels and I realized soon enough that they didn't work anymore after breaking one or two. I paid attention when it was *my* tools being put to misuse. That lesson has stayed with me more than 50 years.
BTW John. My spell checker crapped out on your last name. You owe me a new one. :)
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Some spell checkers are like the Harbor Freight power tools I've had the misfortune to use (but not own)... they almost get the job done. ;~)
As a kid I grew up in the 60s and 70s when corded hand tools were becoming popular for homeowners. I didn't have a chance to work with good woodworking hand tools as a kid... It took working at Colonial Williamsburg, VA, at the transition from my 20s to 30s, to learn that you can do fine work with no electric. The net result of those experiences is that I've got a lot of nice, sharp and well maintained hand tools and my kids use them...
John
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On 1/24/2012 8:27 PM, John Grossbohlin wrote:

<Steve Turner likes this>
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On Tue, 24 Jan 2012 21:27:08 -0500, "John Grossbohlin"

Speaking of sharpness, to this day I hate sharpening tools. So much so, that I've seriously considering the purchase of a Tormek 7. Anything to make the job easier and faster.
I don't remember anyone here saying they use one. They've only been out about a year, so maybe they haven't be out long enough.
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I'm not sure about the current users here but certainly we've had Tormek users over the years. They seem expensive but when I stop and think about the fact that I have a slow speed grinder from Woodcraft, a Makita horizontal water grinder, a full complement of Arkansas stones (including a large black very fine bench stone that was about $100), a bunch of files and an angle grinder so I can sharpen anything I own, the Tormek starts to look quite reasonable.
John
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On Wed, 25 Jan 2012 11:16:57 -0500, "John Grossbohlin"

One thing that impresses me about Tormek's ads is that the Tormek 7 is also guaranteed for commercial use. If they're prepared to warranty one under those conditions, it likely speaks volumes as to its reliability.
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On 1/25/2012 11:40 AM, Dave wrote:

MAYBE! I kinda seriously doubt a pro shop would use one that much, time is money and they are slower than a dry grinder. Now if a pro shop did use one I think that Tormek would be willing to warrant the few that might need repairs in order to be able to say that it will last the same amount of years in a commercial shop.
Having said that the Tormek is very well made and there are few parts that will wear out. The bushings/bearings are serviceable and other than the motor that is about all that will wear out.
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I was thinking if it's a pro shop, they've be using a Tormek far more often than any private user. If that's so, then the warranty even in the face of repeated commercial use is a good recommendation for the quality of the tool.
As to dry grinding, I'm of the impression that dry grinding is subject to heat build up which can hurt the temper of the metal in a knife. I hope (maybe naively), that a pro shop would be a little more responsible with their customer's knives and not subject them to the effects of heat deterioration.
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On 1/25/2012 2:33 PM, Dave wrote:

Misunderstanding here. LOL
I was thinking a woodworking shop doing their own sharpening. You are/were talking about a sharpening shop.
Actually I think sharpening shops use a sanding belt to sharpen most tools. Those belts go to up to 6000 grit.
Any way the Work Sharp system uses a heat sink for dissipating heat when sharpening chisels and IIRC they recommend touching the chisel to the grinding surface a few seconds on and a few seconds off repeatedly.
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On 1/24/2012 10:31 PM, Dave wrote:

I have a Tormek. I cannot really say that I like it. I works as advertised but has inherent issues IMHO.
I bought the works package several years ago.
First off it is best left "set up" in it's trough of water as a simple sharpening task gets put off if you have to pull out the sharpener and fill the trough with water. I prefer to sharpen several items at once.
Given the opportunity I would sell it and replace it with a WorkSharp 3000.
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I bit the bullet and bought one a few weeks ago. I'm extremely happy with the results, especially after experiencing what a sharp chisel feels like.
As for mess, it makes one. What you've got is a slow speed disc sander with no provisions to catch the dust and shavings thrown off. It's just as essential, if not moreso, to wear your dust mask when using this tool as it is any Woodworking operation.
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