slicing a 1x8 board

I am trying to slice a 1"x8"x3' piece of walnut into a couple of 3/8"x8" boards. My bandsaw is a benchtop model that doesn't have a wide enough opening. I tried to do this on my tablesaw by raising the blade ad high as possible. It came close, and it was sorta awkward to get an exact cut.
Any suggestions?
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On 1/21/2013 2:39 PM, rlz wrote:

Years ago I used to resaw by starting on the table saw, with cuts on both sides as high as I was comfortable raising the blade, then go back through the kerfs with a good old fashioned handsaw ... you have some cleanup to do, with a plane, sander, but it is an effective, and safer way on some table saws.
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On 1/21/2013 2:48 PM, Swingman wrote:

That's the way I did it. Then run it through the plainer for thickness.
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I saw a "how-to" video many years ago that suggested the same method, except they completed the cut with the bandsaw instead of a hand saw. I'm not really sure why they went through all the trouble, my bandsaw with a 1 HP has no trouble slicing through pieces as big as the opening.
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On Monday, January 21, 2013 2:48:15 PM UTC-6, Swingman wrote:

I have done it on a table saw as swingman described too. You need a good blade and some power but it works. Be careful and take it slow because the blade can bind and give you a kickback.
Ron
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7-1/4" framing blade is 1/16" kerf, ideal for making the starter cuts. Leaves a rough surface, but nothing a plane won't fix. I have a shopmade frame saw and an old George Bishop crosscut saw, both retoothed 5 pt rip with minimal set, for just this task.
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On Monday, January 21, 2013 12:39:02 PM UTC-8, rlz wrote:

I have done this even when I had a bandsaw deep enough but difficult wood to resaw. Of course then I finish the last cut on the band saw anyway. Some guys resaw this way all the time. Actually faster usually. Use a thin kerf blade if you can on the TS it will waste less, be closer to the BS kerf and easier on the TS.
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regarding building a jig, would an upside-down U shape cover for the fence., with an adjustable L shape laying flat on top work to keep the board staight up against the fence? I thinking that it would work in conjunction with a featherboard as well.
B=board F=Fence X=Jig s=top of the saw
X X X X X X X X B X X X X X B X F F X B X F F X B X F F X B X F F X ssssssssssssss
Thanks for the tip to use a thin kerf blade. I hadn't thought of that. (not being sarcastic)
Robin
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wrote:

Are there any cabinet shops, or other woodworking shops in your area? For a small fee, maybe even free for this amount of work, they could perform this task for you.
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It's not a very large board so if you have a rip handsaw it wouldn't be a terrible job to simply resaw it with the handsaw....
Scribe double scribe lines (guide lines) around all the edges with a marking gauge such that the space between the scribe lines is the location of the desired saw kerf. Put the board in a vice angled such that you can see an end and a long edge. Using both the end and edge scribe lines saw down until the saw reaches the far corner of the end. Yes, you will be making an angled cut and not cutting straight across the end of the board. Take the board our of the vice and flip it around so that the unsawn corner of the board is now facing you and again, using the scribe line, saw down until the saw reaches the lower corner. Repeat... As you reach the last foot or so of board you probably want to flip it end for end and repeat the process until the two kerfs meet. The beauty of this approach is the kerf from each cut guides the saw for the next cut so you only have to pay attention to one scribe line.
Once you understand the process it isn't too difficult. I showed my sons how to do it when they were 7 and 9 years old. Though not specially showing them resawing for thickness, there are some sample photos from a project they made at the time at http://www.midhudsonwoodworkers.org/Gallerypages/Otherpages/Grossbohlinother/grossbohlinothermain.htm
In the photos they are using a rip saw, jointer and smoothing planes, marking gauge, Stanley 45 plough plane, shooting board and an L-N cross cut back saw. It was this project that led me to get an L-N 5. The L-N 7 was way to heavy and my grandfather's old Millers Falls No 22 (their equivalent of a 7) was still a lot of plane for them.
BTW, they were making picture frames for their grandmother. The frames held their school pictures and were given as Christmas presents. The next spring they entered the frames in Woodworkers Showcase in Saratoga Springs and won 2nd place in the youth category. Garret Hack was one of the judges and after judging I showed him photos of the boys at work. He made a lot of favorable comments to them. BTW, that is when they started getting higher level ribbons than me... I only got an honorable mention in that show. ;~) I put some photos up in ABPW.
The moral here is that once you understand the process it can be done!
John
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It's not a very large board so if you have a rip handsaw it wouldn't be a terrible job to simply resaw it with the handsaw....
Scribe double scribe lines (guide lines) around all the edges with a marking gauge such that the space between the scribe lines is the location of the desired saw kerf. Put the board in a vice angled such that you can see an end and a long edge. Using both the end and edge scribe lines saw down until the saw reaches the far corner of the end. Yes, you will be making an angled cut and not cutting straight across the end of the board. Take the board our of the vice and flip it around so that the unsawn corner of the board is now facing you and again, using the scribe line, saw down until the saw reaches the lower corner. Repeat... As you reach the last foot or so of board you probably want to flip it end for end and repeat the process until the two kerfs meet. The beauty of this approach is the kerf from each cut guides the saw for the next cut so you only have to pay attention to one scribe line.
Once you understand the process it isn't too difficult. I showed my sons how to do it when they were 7 and 9 years old. Though not specially showing them resawing for thickness, there are some sample photos from a picture frame project they made at the time at http://www.midhudsonwoodworkers.org/Gallerypages/Otherpages/Grossbohlinother/grossbohlinothermain.htm
In the photos they are using a rip saw, jointer and smoothing planes, marking gauge, Stanley 45 plough plane, shooting board and an L-N cross cut back saw. It was this project that led me to get an L-N 5. The L-N 7 was way to heavy and my grandfather's old Millers Falls No 22 (their equivalent of a 7) was still a lot of plane for them.
BTW, they were making picture frames for their grandmother. The frames held their school pictures and were given as Christmas presents. The next spring they entered the frames in Woodworkers Showcase in Saratoga Springs and won 2nd place in the youth category. Garret Hack was one of the judges and after judging I showed him photos of the boys at work. He made a lot of favorable comments to them. BTW, that is when they started getting higher level ribbons than me... I only got an honorable mention in that show. ;~) I put some photos up in ABPW.
The moral here is that once you understand the process it can be done!
John
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It can be done with a tablesaw if the board is truly 1x8 and not actually 3/4" thick. You may want to attache a high fence to the fence, and make sure the blade, fence, etc. are set up as square and true as possible. Use good safety procedures when making the cut. Cut through one edge, then the other, in increments if the saw bogs down. Use a hand saw to cut out the small center section that remains, then finish to width with a hand plane (or run through a planer if you have one) I've done it a few times for drawer sides and similar when I only needed a few pieces. If the walnut is scarce or pricey, you might want to refine your technique on a piece of pine or something first.
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On Jan 22, 6:47pm, snipped-for-privacy@sdf.lNoOnSePsAtMar.org (Larry W) wrote:

Thanks everyone for your replies. I will be playing in the shop this weekend and giving it a try.
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I had to do that very thing today with some 10/4 stock for custom corbels for a client's project, so I took some photos of the process:
~ Table Saw:
I had the band saw pulled out in the middle of the shop to rough cut the corbels, but wanted a more precise thickness to match the corbels to the trim without a lot of cleanup, so table saw it was.
The pieces were simply too short to safely resaw through on the table saw in two passes, so I purposely left the middle strip for the hand saw work.
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopJigsFixturesMethods#5841526418584043154
~ Hand Saw:
Being short, a few strokes of a Shark and it was toast:
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopJigsFixturesMethods#5841526995947341186
~ Cleanup with plane (My old Bailey #5):
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopJigsFixturesMethods#5841527535854595538
Here's what I was after:
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopPlaque#5841532573465125266
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopPlaque#5841571171341008930
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