Size and mobility of 6" vs 8" jointers

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rob snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net (rob) writes:

If you have a straight shot into the basement you should be all right.
I bought a DJ-20, brought it home and then determined there was never going to be a way to get it into my basement. Brought it back and exchanged for a PM54A.
My basement stairs is U shaped with a landing half way down. No way to carry an 8' long crate down the stairs. It was just too darn heavy to get through the window. I didn't want to uncrate it as then there would be temptation to carry it by the table ends. It probably would not fit down the stairs even uncrated.
Brian Elfert
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I think I should be OK. I have a patio door to go through and then a straight half flight of stairs down to the shop. I'll have to get 2 or 3 good strong friends to help out (well, they're friends for now at least...this might change things). Grizzly customer service says the crates are 120 and 310 lbs. Ouch.
I have pretty much determined I am going to go with the G0500 based on the good things I've heard about it. Its that or the G1018, but for $100 extra bucks, you get 1/2hp more, 10" more bed, 1 more cutterhead blade and a dust hood. Sounds like its worth the extra money. Y'all agree, or is 1 1/2hp plenty for this size machine?
Again, thanks for the comments folks.
(rob) writes:

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An alternative if you need it, is to use a dolly with the larger balloon tires with about a third of the air let out. Works great on stairs and over uneven surfaces. Me and my bad back just dragged a pretty sizable piece of scavanged granite up and down a bunch of stairs.
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rob snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net (rob) wrote in message

I bought the 6" Jet.. For awhile I kicked myself for not buying a jointer with longer beds.. But then I realized that most boards don't really NEED to be jointed. The planer is often good enough.. Now I know it's not as good a joining every surface, but it's good enough.
I mainly use ok. If I get a piece that is warped/twisted too badly to flattened with the planer, I set it aside. When I do raised panelled doors for cabinents, or something else that requires a lot of 2' to 4' pieces, I cut up the reject pile and use the jointer to true them up.
Works pretty well if you buy your wood in big quanities and can pick through your own stack. Or if you're willing to buy a few extra boards every time (naturally they will be used eventually).
And actually, I'm glad I was forced to do this technique. I save a lot of time by using the planer only about 80% of the time, and saving the jointer for the 20% or so "problem boards". I can't tell the difference from the days where I used to joint everything, but maybe the more anal retentive types can. :)
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Do you not rough cross cut before jointing? I have a basic 6" jointer. I can mill up to about 5-foot long boards with that. Precious few of my project individual components are longer than that. Sometimes I will componentize a design to keep from having to mill really long components (e.g., stacked cabinets). For widths greater than 6", I joint then glue. Then I find that it's good enough for the planer.
If it fits on the jointer, I see no reason to skip that step. If it doesn't, I'll sight the board and take off the high spots by hand if necessary.
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