simple, cheap lumber rack

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kansascats wrote:

<snip> ---------------------------------------
Remember KISS?
Try it.
http://tinyurl.com/3vc6vm2
Lew
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The (almost) best laid plans: A lumber rack story: During the remodel of my shop (burned rent house), I dedicated one bedroom for lumber storage. Built racks with 2X4s on edge, with vertical supports about 3' apart. http://www.flickr.com/photos/43836144@N04/4035250182/in/photostream
No doubt the racks would support most of the lumber I have..... including quite a few hurricane-downed trees I had milled. Under the racks, on the floor, I stored small 8" -12" diameter logs (to be used for stair construction, later). With the racks about 2/3 filled, some of the floor joists, of the room, failed. I had to get under the house, jack up the flooring, add pillars and more 4X6 beam support. I, also, scabbed sleepers along the broken joists. It could have been worse.
Sonny
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Yeah, and a login page is not KISS.

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You mean Fred Herman and Earl Nightingale's "Keep It Simple, Salesman"?
More on Nightingale here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earl_Nightingale More on K.I.S.S. here: http://www.nobsbooks.com/pdfs/sales-chapter9.pdf
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"Steve" wrote:
I wrote: >>Remember KISS? ------------------------------------- "Steve" wrote:

----------------------------------------- Actually it was a reference to a PDF file from WoodSmithShop for a well designed lumber storage rack using plywood as the base material that gets mounted on the wall.
Lew .
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Another option I'm testing --
-- drill a "properly sized hole" about 2.5" deep into a 2x (angle the holes just a bit) -- screw those to the wall studs (24" oc) -- put 1/2" blackpipe (or 3/4" EMT) that fit snugly into those holes
Earlier someone had a photo of this idea. That was my original plan, 3/4" EMT that is 2.5" deep in the wood and extending 12" out of the wood, seems to be able to support over 100#
The challenge is drilling the right size hole. Plan to get some spade bits and grind them to the right size (OD of pipe/EMT)
The risk is the pipe pulls out of the hole when moving lumber around.
I don't want the brackets themselves to take-up a lot of space. 1/2" black pipe, or 3/4" EMT is ideal.
The idea is not to be able to store 100s of board feet of material, but to get the bit I have off the floor and easily viewable and sortable.
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On 9/20/2011 12:31 PM, kansascats wrote:

Personally (and what do I know?), I'm not sure it's worth drilling into the wall studs. What if you break them? Why not erect something in front of the wall which rests on the concrete on the floor? One can still use the black pipe, etc. Just a thought. I saw a picture of a 3-level industrial-strength coat rack that I thought might work.

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On 9/20/2011 11:31 AM, kansascats wrote: ...

...
The OD on those is pretty large for using only 2x stock--I'd suggest even smaller but as strong or stronger would be solid rod stock.
As for pulling out, just pin them--something as little as drilling a hole and an 8d or 10d nail thru the side is plenty. Or, of course, the expedient of a dollop of epoxy or construction adhesive in the hole when inserting.
Somehow, methinks you're over thinking this considerable... :)
--
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Yeah, by the time they get through fartin' around, they could have had their Sterling rack up and stocked. I think my setup cost me a little over $100 but it holds well over a ton of wood SAFELY. I slit 2" pvc pipe and snugged it over the top of each bracket to avoid any plating transfer or scuffing. http://goo.gl/11AiI
http://diversifycomm.com/wood/shopwall2.jpg bare rack
http://diversifycomm.com/wood/shopwall3.jpg Filled somewhat
-- A sound mind in a sound body is a short but full description of a happy state in this world. -- John Locke
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NIce, but I need to get a lot more compact then having giant triangular braces in the way. The 1/2" pipe will take up less then 1". That is the point of this -- to be able to provide a bunch of tightly spaced brackets such that 10 or fewer boards on each "pile" can be readily viewed, sorted, etc. Rather than have 4 "shelves" of 2-foot capacity each, I'm aiming for 6 to 9" capacity on each. So each bracket cannot consume even inches of space. The idea is to get a little stuff on many brackets vs much stuff on few brackets.
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On Thu, 8 Sep 2011 16:14:15 -0700 (PDT), kansascats

I bet the weak link is the wall anchorage. Screws pulling out, screws missing studs, that kinna' stuff.
Jes' sayin'....
-Zz
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Agree. Plan is to attach the brackets to a 2x4; sit the 2x4 on the floor; and then screw the 2x4 to the wall stud every 12" or so. Maybe a lag screw instead, but again, 5 shelves @100# max, with most of that being transferred to the floor, does not leave a lot of force perpendicular to the wall. I plan to do some "hanging around" as a test. Keeping that load tight against the supporting 2x4 is an important part of this. That's why I'm only using 14" brackets, and likely only to use the first 8-10" of that. I want to be able to place 3 2x4's on a rack, so that's 10.5", so really a 12" bracket would be fine. I'll look into this. Also, if I'm going to give myself 4' of clearance underneath, then either there will be only 4 brackets or the spacing between each will be more like 9.5".

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Who do you think you are kidding?
The first time you need to put another board on the rack you will use the end of the brackets, only for a day or so, until... Next thing you will wake to a huge crash in the middle of the night and all your nice hardwood will have slid off onto the floor and smashing your mitre saw as it fell to the floor.
The joints in these brackets are stamped out metal. Without an angle support for triangulation strength these things are dangerous with weight on them.
I wouldn't use them for any weight bearing stuff. Use a wood do-it-yourself method as suggested by a few.
Forget the wood to the floor at the wall surface. It doesn't perform any function in the leverage formula. Your wall studs are strong enough with some decent screws.
------------ "kansascats" wrote in message wrote:

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On 9/8/2011 7:14 PM, kansascats wrote:

My first shop had exposed rafters and I made this lumber rack out of 1x6's and 2x4's, which worked well.
http://jbstein.com/Flick/WoodStorage.jpg
My current shop has a finished ceiling, so I built this one, which works also but I had a bunch of free pipe laying around:
http://jbstein.com/Flick/PipeWoodRack.jpg
This style, which you are contemplating, works well because you can use the space underneath for tools and stuff.
A year or 2 ago, I built this one:
http://jbstein.com/Flick/LumberCart.jpg
http://jbstein.com/Flick/LumberCart2.jpg
This last one is great. It holds more wood than you can imagine in very little space. I have it right next to my table saw at 90 so the wood is all highly visible, highly accessible. It has tons of storage for all the short stuff that's a PIA to store on wall racks, and all the long boards, and all your plywood, in one compact space saving place:-)
It's not hard to make, and really doesn't cost much although it should have steel wheels on it. It's a bear to move fully loaded. This thing has plans all over the internet if you need them. I used wafer board for the walls, much cheaper and works fine.
I don't even use the old rack any more. When I built it I thought it would take up a lot of space, but surprisingly, it doesn't.
--
Jack
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Jack Stein,
Those are almost exactly what I've been prototyping. I built this cart: http://www.scrgeek.com/woodwork/storageSheets.html
I beefed it up some -- used EMT instead of PVC, added some lateral support, etc. It holds a ton of material, but at that capacity it's not "mobile". The multipurpose cart you made is probably more practical. I have 10 sheets of birch/maple ply that I need to store. I just need to realize that it has to lean up against a wall.
On your pipe rack -- did you face-glue two 2x4s? How did you drill the proper size hole? Did you secure the pipe into the hole?
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On 9/20/2011 1:33 PM, kansascats wrote:

Yes, the one I build is really great. I show two wheels on each end, but I put one wheel on each end and two in the middle, like the wood carts at home depot. It really needs steel wheels though, too much weight for what I have on it.

Sorry, just read you post.
I made this 20 years ago, and I think I glued them together, but that's not necessary. The picture doesn't show all the screws, but there are more than 2 screws holding them to the wall. I have them hanging on a cement block wall. As far as the proper sized hole... Drill holes in some scrap until you get the right size. Get the pipe first:-) The holes are 3" deep, through both 2x4's. Angle them up slightly.
The thing is solid as can be, I've had it filled to the brim, no problem.
--
Jack
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