signing your work

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Whenever I'd build anything in the shop, I'd use a magic marker-type pen to write:
"my name" "city" and "date" on the underside or a shielded part of the project. If you've not though to do it, it's a good time to start, and makes a project much more appreciated when given as a gift.
--
Nonny

Have you ever wondered if the bills
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That is oh-so yesterday. These days, a fella slides his debit card down the strippers crack.
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wrote:

I owe you a big, "Thanks," since I hate sounding my age. <grin>
--
Nonny

Have you ever wondered if the bills
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Yes it does. Not so much now, but it will later. It doesn't mean much if it says "Christmas, 2007", but it does if it says "Christmas 1977".
When visiting my sister a year or so ago, she pulled out a little keepsake box I made for her in 1968. We know it was because I burned my initials and the date on it with my woodburning tool. The box was completely cut with a hand saw, sanded to death, and had some kind of stain infused colored finish that I also put on the hinges.
I was kind of touched she kept it for over 40 years. She told me that every time she runs across it when cleaning she smiles.
Robert
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I provide some of my customers with a provenance of the article I made for them. This includes photos taken from each stage of manufacture from the planks of wood to the finished job.
One box owner told me it made his box very special. The box was for his subbuteo players and has now travelled around most of Europe as he plays in many international tournaments.
Alan Retired ...so yes I do have all day!

Yes it does. Not so much now, but it will later. It doesn't mean much if it says "Christmas, 2007", but it does if it says "Christmas 1977".
When visiting my sister a year or so ago, she pulled out a little keepsake box I made for her in 1968. We know it was because I burned my initials and the date on it with my woodburning tool. The box was completely cut with a hand saw, sanded to death, and had some kind of stain infused colored finish that I also put on the hinges.
I was kind of touched she kept it for over 40 years. She told me that every time she runs across it when cleaning she smiles.
Robert
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One of my uncles taught me to sign my work, and he always signed his. This was back in the 1950's. Then, one day he was at a yard sale and saw something familiar. Somebody had put one of his ash trays out for sale. He bought it himself, and never gave them anything again.
--
Nonny

Have you ever wondered if the bills
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(or copier - print a whole sheet and cut them out) then put one down and apply the finish over it. If you find the right kind of paper, it will turn transparent when you apply the finish so only the letters remain. Sorry, can't recommend a specific paper (onionskin comes to mind), but a copy shop should be able to print up a variety of paper stocks for you to experiment with for a few cents per sheet. Using a computer/laser printer you can print very small, and you can embed designs or logos, or use "creative" fonts.
Yet another way is to use the heat transfer paper hobbyists use to make their own printed circuit boards. You print the pattern reversed on this special paper with a laser printer (or copier), then transfer the design onto whatever you want by ironing it. I think I've even seen special paper for making T-shirts this way.
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wrote:

I use a branding iron.
Regards,
Tom Watson http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 /
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I think there are a couple of my shop cabinets with my blood on them. Does that count?
I carve initials & year on an under-side spot.
Sonny
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"Sonny" wrote

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Woodcraft sells an electric wood burning "branding iron" that says "Hand Crafted by (name). You can order it and specify name or organization for name. Our daughter got me one for Christmas a few years ago and it works pretty well.
RonB
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On Tue, 03 Nov 2009 12:22:09 -0800, RonB wrote:

I guess I'm a bit fussy about "Hand Crafted". If I used power tools, it ain't so - at least in my view. That's why my branding iron, also from Woodcraft, says "From the shop of (name)".
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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FUSSY.... Yikes! What a nice way to say it. Did your hands guide the saw and set it up to cut? Did you mark and measure? Did you sand and finish?
Or was it cut out on a CNC machine, sanded by a CNC machine, assembled by machines that glued, pressed and joined the materials, then sprayed it with robotic arms to apply the finish and cured the finish in an ultraviolet oven?
Using a strict standard, Duncan Phyfe and his contemporaries could not claim "hand crafted" work. He used steam and water power, as did those that prepared lumber for his use. He had a cadre of apprentices that worked under him as well as fellow craftsmen that assisted him in his efforts. It seems to be an unsure bit of ground (given his output) to determine how much Duncan Phyfe is <all> Duncan Phyfe.
It's great to hold yourself to that ultrahigh standard, but remember, NOTHING you will make will make the absolute of "hand crafted". I don't think people expect you t brew your own finishes, make your own sandpaper, mill your own boards or use a hand plane to smooth out all of the mill marks from rough sawn lumber (sawed by a machine), or to hand plane your boards to thickness.
It's OK to use some power tools. Trust me...
But if you exclude one, you should exclude them all. Not just the ones you want. Then even your branding iron would actually be an iron made by a smith, heated in a hot fire.
Robert
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It's great to hold yourself to that ultrahigh standard, but remember, NOTHING you will make will make the absolute of "hand crafted". I don't think people expect you t brew your own finishes, make your own sandpaper, mill your own boards or use a hand plane to smooth out all of the mill marks from rough sawn lumber (sawed by a machine), or to hand plane your boards to thickness.
It's OK to use some power tools. Trust me...
But if you exclude one, you should exclude them all. Not just the ones you want. Then even your branding iron would actually be an iron made by a smith, heated in a hot fire.
Robert
That's my view also.
I can only remember one occasion when I produced anything that came close to the definition of hand made. There was an old shed that my employer's pioneer grandfather had built from bush timber. A fire damaged much of the framework, so he decided that we would totally rebuild it, using the same methods as the originals as a tribute to them. He also held the view that building things entirely by hand was "character building and good for the soul," even if no longer practical.
We felled the timber (Gimlet) with axes, trimmed and shaped the logs with adze, axe and handsaw. Holes were bored in the timber with a brace and auger bit. No nails were used, instead the structure was held together with heavy galvanised wire. The holes for the uprights were all dug by hand using crowbar and shovel. We would have used horses to transport the logs, but they were long since gone, - so we compromised and hauled them with a '38 Ford sidevalve V8 truck. The structure still stands today, as good as when we built it. (That was about 40 years ago.)
We went at ot non-stop and it was some of the hardest sustained physical work I can recall, - it gave me a better sense of just how tough and resourceful the early pioneers were prior to the advent of machinery. It was also one of the most satisfying experiences I've ever had. : )
diggerop
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On Thu, 05 Nov 2009 09:16:20 +0800, diggerop wrote:

Agreed. I think some people read more into my response than I meant. For example, I consider anything I turn on my lathe to be handcrafted, even though I didn't make the lathe or the tools.
But when I build a jewelry box by running the rough lumber through my jointer, planer, thickness sander, and table saw or bandsaw, finish sand with an ROS, and finish with a spray, I just can't make myself call that handcrafted, even if I cut the dovetails by hand.
Others are welcome to do so. I'm not denigrating their choice nor am I trying to convert everyone to my way. It's just the way I think (or not,according to my wife).
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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wrote:

You can circumvent all the "ethics" questions- if there actually are any- by signing the work
Joe Blow Anywhere USA Christmas 2009
That's what I did and it conveys the personalization and the fact that I "somehow" built it, where I built it and when I built it. The magic marker I used was applied to the wood before finishing, so it's protected and submerged in the finish.
--
Nonny

You cannot make a stupid kid smart by
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On Thu, 5 Nov 2009 10:42:30 -0800, the infamous "Nonny"

Nix the "Christmas" part. It'll reduce sales and resales by limiting it to people who are of (and still like) that particular religion. November or December would be neutral, but most folks just use the year of manufacture.
-- "To compel a man to subsidize with his taxes the propagation of ideas which he disbelieves and abhors is sinful and tyrannical." -- Thomas Jefferson
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On Tue, 03 Nov 2009 18:34:59 -0600, Larry Blanchard

I went with the "Handcrafted By..." one because, "Built According To The Ethic Of The Workmanship Of Risk" was too long.
Regards,
Tom Watson http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 /
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On Wed, 04 Nov 2009 09:47:10 -0500, the infamous Tom Watson

Ah, nice Confuse-a-Cat title. I like it!
-- "To compel a man to subsidize with his taxes the propagation of ideas which he disbelieves and abhors is sinful and tyrannical." -- Thomas Jefferson
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Well, my daughter chose the wording when she ordered the gift.
But I personally don't see a problem with "hand-crafted". By the time I band-saw, glue and form (with drum sander or rasps) the 90 to 100 pieces of hardwood it takes to make a rocking horse or similar item, even using mostly Norm tools, I feel like it is hand crafted.
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