Signal to Noise Ratio Reduction

In an attempt to increase the Signal part of the group's Signal to Noise Ratio - Fun Turnings. I've had a little UniMat - a micro version of a ShopSmith type of thing, for years. Rediscovered it and started playing with it between projects. Fun. Can see why some people get heavy into pen turning. Very spontaneus this turning thing. Shapes appear before your very eyes - in minutes and not hours or days or weeks. Getting my knuckles close to the spinning three jaw chuck gets a little scary but no where near as scary as spinning carbide.
http://home.comcast.net/~charliebcz/Turning/Turning1.html
Can foresee drawer pulls, turned handles, small turned columns for jewelry boxes etc.. Anyone use a small lathe for making furniture accoutrements? Care to share tips, techniques and turning ideas?
Now I'm going to have to learn to sharpen turning gouges? Where's that Lee book on sharpening EVERYTHING? Seems like "All roads lead to the sharpening station.".
charlie b
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Check ebay for "109 lathe" if you want to see something cute. It's a late 30s-40s era baby metal lathe. Much stronger than Unimat, but doesn't mill. Wilson

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Hey charlie,
I agree that turning out "little stuff" is fun. I have a full size lathe but just finished 3 pairs of earrings for mothers Day. It was quite enjoyable. I have turned several door pulls on the Delta midi I had originally. turning one of anything is relativly easy, it is the second one that test the skill and patience.
BRuce
charlie b wrote:

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BRuce

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