Sideboard Strategies?

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BTY the Bostitch gun worked great although I spent more time dealing with the tail which I have not had to deal with in the past. That however is no fault of the gun, it was my decision to go with air operated.
On a plus side, the guard teeth on the Bostitch gripped far better than the ines on the gas operated Paslode that I have used and toe nailing was never a tough task.
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: I didn't understand the question. Are you meaning resistance to : outgassing vapor transfer from uncured wood, or vapor penetration : through the finsh to the wood?
Both, I think, though the focus of the article was on limiting seasonal expansion in a humid environment, so I was thinking mostly the latter.
    -- Andy Barss
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In either case, the answer is probably essentially the same. More solids on the wood will limit penetration. Limit can be read all the way from "slow down" (wax) to outright "block" (spar varnish).
This is my opinion in really broad terms based on my experience only, as this is a testy subject among finishers. Wood finishing is unique from the stand point that we look for penetration in the finish to help with adhesion.
Theortetically, longer drying oils will get better penetration and allow a thicker coat of resin due to increased cure time. Shorter drying solvent based finishes, specifically lacquer, have much less resin in them (and with me thinning 20%, even less per coat!) will dry much faster after the carrier evaporates and leave behind less resin behind to catalyse.
In a very general way, this lack of penetration coupled with a thin layer of resin is why you can set a sweating water glass on a lacquer finished table and leave a ring as opposed to setting a water glass in a table finished with poly. After all, the ring under the glass is nothing but water vapor. Think about it like this: ever spray lacquer on a really humid day with off temps and get finish blush? Same thing.
Wax provides little or no protection as it gets little or no penetration. Wax sits on top of the surface and forms a film over the wood. There are lots of different waxes for different purposes (liberon wax, butchers wax, finishing wax, buffalo wax and all manner of colored waxes,) but they all perform in the same manner with some being better than others. For the most part, the strong point of wax is to make the surface more abrasion resistant (slicker), and easier to clean (slicker, less adherance of dirt). Some like that soft feel that wax leaves, too. That would be the reason I would use it.
Robert
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"Leon" wrote in message

I used the term "veneer", because Robert did. You will note that it is first in quotes in my reply to Robert ... that was done on purpose.
On the website it is "laminated".
... dickhead is still batting zero.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 2/20/07
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