Sick of woodworking??

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On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 05:51:24 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@esper.com (Dave Mundt) wrote:

It seems typical that bookbinding books are either basic craft-hobby books, or _very_ dense. I've seen metallurgy texts that were an easier read than most on bookbinding.
--
Smert' spamionam

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Andy Dingley wrote:

Most of the easily available bookbinding books that aren't craft soft of things are reprints, often from around the turn of the 20th century. They expect a lot of equipment and some stuff, such as supplies, that aren't as easily available today.
The other problem with traditional bookbinding texts is that the goal of those bookbinders was to put the book together so it could be taken apart and rebound in a couple of hundred years. That not only complicated the process, it meant they deliberately limited themselves to tried and true materials and techniques.
Diehl's book is a fascinating read and includes a lot of examples of classic bindings, history of bookbinding and a discussion of 'current' issues (such as an inexpensive but serviceable library binding). However for practicality, I'd go with Lewis' "Basic Bookbinding."
--RC
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On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 21:28:30 GMT, Rick Cook

I'd disagree with that, compared to today's practice.
Craft bookbinding (i.e. no more than a handful of each title, done by individual craftspeople not machines) today is even more of a high-end specialisation. 100 years ago (or even 50) there was a large trade in simply putting books together. These days craft bookbinding is pretty rare at any level and owing to the cost of it, it's even more restricted to just the most valuable of books. Who can pay ten times the cost of a book to bind it, especially when it's still in print ?
One bookbinder I work with has a horror of all case binding as cheap and shoddy work, fit only for lending libraries - all spines should be sewn onto cords. As the books I work with when with him are typically 400 years old, he's taking a rather narrow view, but understandable.
--
Smert' spamionam

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Andy Dingley wrote:

It depends on what you're trying to do. If you're dealing with valuable antique books, these practices may well be justified, but most of us aren't. Most amateur bookbinders want to produce a good-looking binding that will wear well and that's about all.
Under those circumstances, and lacking the tools and skills of the turn-of-the-century bookbinder, it makes sense to use more modern materials and different methods. (I tend to agree with your friend about case bindings, btw, but that has at least as much to do with liking the look and feel of cord-sewn books as their greater durability.)
And there are a lot of reasons for binding books by hand besides the conventional ones. I know someone who has carefully and lovingly rebound an entire set cheap, perfect-bound paperbacks in signature bindings between fine leather covers ornamented with iron reinforcements. Of course the books in question are John Norman's Gor novels.
--RC (who bound his first book -- a cheap paperback poetry collection at 14 and still has it.)
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On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 05:51:24 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@esper.com (Dave Mundt) calmly ranted:

I made the mistake of asking the reference lady at the local library (while I was there) instead of sitting down and checking the index myself. She came up with nothing (a 3 page in-house book repair sheet which she printed out for me), I found THIRTY FREAKIN' SIX books on the subject in the index and just ordered 8 to scan or peruse.

Thanks. I usually try the library first, then buy if the book is a "keeper." Ebay has been really good for cheap prices on books lately.
------------------------------------------------------------- * * Humorous T-shirts Online * Norm's Got Strings * Wondrous Website Design * * http://www.diversify.com -------------------------------------------------------------
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Andy Dingley wrote:

It gave me a few ideas.

getting some paper here and sending it over the pond to you. Let me know how it goes.
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Mark L. wrote:

FWIW, Van Arsdale's book was the one I followed when doing a shoji window treatment (
http://uweb.txstate.edu/~cv01/shoji.jpg ). He gives very precise set-by-step instructions, and if you follow them to the letter, you should be OK.
Of course, on a project like that, the devil is in the details. It was absolutely the most exacting woodworking I have ever undertaken. Tiny m&t's and half-laps, tight tolerances, fragile wood, etc. make for a pretty intense woodworking experience.
And the glueup was ridiculous. You need approximately five hands to do it.
So yes ... I am encouraging you to give it a try. At least once. :-)
Chuck Vance
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Sounds like fun to me. As a tool and die maker, I like trying precision work in materials other than steel. Conan the Librarian wrote:

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BTW, I just went to Amazon and ordered Toshio's book, a mobile base for my DJ20 and this "Making Japanese-Style Lamps and Lanterns by Edward R. Turner" Thanks for the heads up on Toshio's book.                             Mark L.
Andy Dingley wrote:

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That's interesting how people are different. Of course 35 would be too many for me but I just spent the evening with SWMBO trying to convince her that I need to have 3 projects at any one time. My rational is this. If I'm in the finishing stages of a project and I'm tired of the sanding and finishing or I just get impatient, I can go to another project and work on that stage. By having 3 projects at any time I will have a beginning, middle and end stage project. Right now I have a flag display case that got the last glue up last night and needs sanding and finishing, a jewelry box that has some rough cuts and is just about mid way and I just started the plannign and budgeting for a cabinet for the bathroom. When I get home tonight I can either sand wood, cut wood, or buy wood for my next project. YMMV
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I work the same way. Especially if one project is intricate and you need a mental and/or physical break from something.
At times I have a dozen things I'd like to start but can't decide what is next. Ed
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On 29 Sep 2004 10:27:09 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@usa.xerox.com (Ron) wrote:

A real good way to do it and avoid burnout. Unfortunately my line of not quite finished projects is getting unwieldy. I also mix in some general carpentry projects, electrical work, plumbing repair and shop furniture construction. Never get bored, just need more time to get stuff done.
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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On 29 Sep 2004 10:27:09 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@usa.xerox.com (Ron) wrote:

I tend to have 3 or 4 projects going at a time, but they're usually very different from each other... a book stand for the wife, a shelf for the garage, etc... Which one I work on is usually dependant on what mood I'm in and whether I feel like routing, dado'ing, sanding, etc..
Mac
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I'm glad that works for you, I'm completely opposite.
I *like* 50 projects going on at once. <G>
Barry
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"Ba r r y" wrote in message

... and that's _exactly_ what I would do if I didn't exercise some sort of discipline. Nothing would ever get finished. Sort of the woodworker's corollary to "Physician, heal thyself" .... "Wooddorker, know thyself". ;>)
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 7/10/04
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I get nagged unless I start another project with out finishing the current one. usually because I want to buy more wood, "you haven't finished the last project you started you don't need to start another one!"
and yet she has all manner of unfinished projects, huh imagine that
Ba r r y wrote:

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Make some shop furniture - no pressure - they just have to serve their purpose. Get away from plywood and face frames and have a go at solid wood stuff. The joinery involved should keep things interesting and challenging for as long as you want to stay in woodworking.
An early shop furniture project was a wall hanging tool cabinet. Started with routed dovetails for the carcase/carcass and then started making modules for various tools using finger joints, dovetails, sliding dovetails, stopped dadoes ...
Kept finding space for more modules and finally quit after making a 4x4x3" dovetailed little drawer.
http://home.comcast.net/~charliebcz/RightToolCabinet.html
If there are kids in the neighborhood then Kid Projects might get the juices flowing. http://home.comcast.net/~charliebcz/KidProjects/KidsProjects7.html
Know anyone who does water colors? Maybe they might like an easel - that folds into three different configuration AND will fit under the bed when not in use http://home.comcast.net/~charliebcz/Easel.html
Perhaps some books - Krenov's The Fine Art of Cabinet Making or The Impractical Cabinet Maker, any by Doug Stowe, ...
As for getting rid of a stationary machine - Buy Once, Cry Once and Will It to a Woodworker.
This too will pass.
charlie b
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I'm planning a wall cabinet as my first "real" project but wanted to practice on smaller items first. The finger-jointed module approach is an excellent idea. Thanks!

Or Krenov's "With Wakened Hands".
Cheers, Mike

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wrote:

So don't just build piddley stuff.
There's a whole lot of "useful" "house" stuff that's useful to own, but basically tedious to make. Worth doing if you want to keep things off the floor, but there's no reward or real pleasure in making the stuff. Do to omuch of this and anyone will get stale.
If you've always wanted to, make yourself a lute (conga drum, boat, carved jester or whatever) Do something with no real point, other than the pleasure of actually making it.
I'm just finishing off a small medieval ark - like this http://www.early-oak.fsnet.co.uk/littleark1.htm only half the size. It's of no real purpose, except that it's a chance to make something with a "clamped front", an early precursor to frame and panel construction.
--
Smert' spamionam

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And don't go back to golf, either. Talk about useless, frustrating, and a waste of time. (Yes, I sorta played this morning. Waste of time.)

<snip>

I'm working on a couple of similar arks/boxes. The several I've done already are nice, but not exactly what I was after. Thanks for the links. It will help with the research.
Patriarch
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