Sick of woodworking??

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Is this a phase I am going through, or is it all over?? I have my gar....shop setup with all the tools I think I will ever need, built a few projects, nothing to fantastic, cabinets for our bathroom, stereo cabinet, and some other piddley stuff. I am in the process of building a desk for my daughter, but fail to get out there to finish it!
Then today I fellow and I were talking tools, and he asks me if I want to sell my jointer that I bought a year ago. I had to think about it, I still don't know what the answer is! Will this go away, or am I doomed?! Greg
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Greg O wrote:

Burnt out are you? I find that absence makes the heart grow fonder. In other words, get away from it for awhile. Do your woodworking because you WANT to do it, not because you HAVE to do it. (Assuming you don't do woodworking professionally - which is a whole nudder subject)
Philski
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Take a break and DON'T sell anything. The value of your tools will change little if you don't use them, but will be costly if you decide to replace them in a year or two.
Do you subscribe to any magazines? If not, wait a while so you get a break, then pick up a copy of one or two from the newsstand and see if any of the projects get you wanting go get back in the shop. Sounds like you've built some good projects that are useful. How about something that you don't really need but would find challenging to work on? Who cares if it takes two months or two years to complete.
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If you want to do something, but not commit to anything large, try a couple of simple boxes, using hand tools you own, with wood already in your possession, preferably scrap, or something set aside as an offcut. Take your time, and don't worry about fancy joinery. Plan on an oil or shellac finish, rubbed out simply with wax. Use this as an excuse not to start anything larger for a while. Maybe store a special handplane in it, or some special old chisels.
I find the commitment to complete is one of the biggest hurdles to enjoyment in a project. I'm happiest when the project is done because I'm finished fooling with it.
There's a mission-inspired bench/table/blanket chest on my bench right now, which I started on 15 months ago. I may finish it before Thanksgiving. And a pair of maple night stands, next to those. The birdseye maple drawers are done, but the tops need leveling, and there's maybe 3 hours past that to the first coat of shellac. I'll get back to them soon. The kitchen upper cabinet prototypes need to be completed. There's real deadline on those. And the oak mantel for Dad.
The fun is in the design. And the handcraft. Deadlines are for work.
Patriarch
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"patriarch snipped-for-privacy@nospam.comcastDOTnet>" <<patriarch> wrote in message

I'm going to print this out in 64 point letters and tape it to the electrical subpanel right above my workbench. You may have just increased my enjoyment of my HOBBY 1000 fold in the next 10 years.
Thanks! Bob
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"patriarch wrote in message

My #1, immutable, unyielding rule in the shop is:
"It is absolutely forbidden to start a new project until the current project is complete."
Besides increasing your enjoyment of woodworking, and mitigating any guilt while adding incentive to finish something, an added benefit is that it gets you off the hook immediately when anyone asks you to do something.
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I have a whiteboard with a list of them, and dots alongside the ones already started. These are just the woodworking projects, not metalworking, sewing or software.
Score for today is 35
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"Andy Dingley" wrote in message

project
Are you married, Andy? Neighbor's and wives is where my self-imposed rule shines. ;>)
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Used to be.

Neighbours and friends wives ! 8-(
Just google for "bathroom shoji" and "ludic potlatch"
--
Smert' spamionam

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Andy, Are you going to do a shoji project?
Andy Dingley wrote:

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wrote:

I'm weak and stupid, so at some point I might find myself relenting.
I'd be better to gnaw my own legs off first though.
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I am kind of fascinated with asian styles and a would like to try shoji screens and light fixtures. I found a few sources for shoji paper. Let em know if you do try something, maybe we can compare notes. Mark L.
Andy Dingley wrote:

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wrote:

Have you read Toshio Odate's shoji book ?

I still can't find a UK source for this. I'm getting my own paper and oiling it myself.
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On Mon, 27 Sep 2004 00:43:41 +0100, Andy Dingley

Jay Van Arsdale's book is great, too. I just picked up the Odate book but haven't read it yet. I think I'll start that tonight. I just finished Larry Niven's "Ringworld Throne" last night.

Oiling it?
---------------------------------------------------------------------- * Scattered Showers My Ass! * Insightful Advertising Copy * --Noah * http://www.diversify.com ----------------------------------------------------------------------
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On Sun, 26 Sep 2004 21:07:50 -0700, Larry Jaques
Either oiling or waxing. Although I've no idea what I ought to be oiling it with. I'm using modern stuff, all the hopefully "traditional" candidates for an oil that I've tried have turned yellow in a couple of months. I still have no idea what the real oil would have been.
I do some paper and book conservation work too, so I already have stacks of Japanese papers to hand. NB - It's Kozo (mulberry) paper that's used here, or maybe Gampi for small pieces - it's never "rice paper" !
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Andy Dingley wrote:

Well, yo could start from scratch, providing you can find the raw materials. http://www.rice-paper.com/about/makeyourown.html This source is in Germany, might be easier for you to get. http://www.fine-tools.com/G312153.htm Wait, just found this one in England http://www.anything-japanese.co.uk/Shoji.htm Joe
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On Mon, 27 Sep 2004 10:59:10 +0100, Andy Dingley

The reason I asked is because I hadn't heard of oiling it.

Can you recommend any good books on bookbinding? I asked the local library and they didn't know. That really surprised me. I fixed one broken back with a silly application of Shoe Goop, but that was for a workbook, not a valuable item. I have some old Harvard Classics I'd like to firm up before sale and I want to do them properly.
Are you doing Japanese-style bookbinding?
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On Mon, 27 Sep 2004 14:58:34 -0700, Larry Jaques
There's one obvious one - the Thames and Hudson "Guide to Bookbinding", which is the standard student textbook on it. Seems to have gone expensive though - maybe it's out of print at the moment ?
Dover press also have a couple by Aldren Watson that are rudimentary, but simpler to follow and far cheaper.
Most of what I do is actually repair and restoration, rather than binding from scratch or even total rebinding. There aren't many books on this, but the Palimpsest list at Stanford is worth reading (archive on the web at http://palimpsest.stanford.edu )

No. I know nothing of it, and I don't know anyone who knows anything about it. I collect woodblock prints, but still can't read Japanese and don't know much about their books.
--
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On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 01:06:14 +0100, Andy Dingley

I've found both at the local library and ordered them. I found a repair book as well. Cheaper still, wot?

Oh, excellent!

Got a gallery online yet? I'd like to see them.
I actually got out into the shop today and got the motor lined up on the lathe. Dave Fleming had sent a long dense rod of mahogany or teak to me and I turned it into 3 marlinspikes.
And the #6 came in. It's a corrugated bottom, my first and last. It cleaned up fairly nicely but will need both tote and knob to be replaced. Both had been glued back together with gawd knows what. Bondo and spackle, I think.
I also glued some jarrah on the bottom of my Knight shoulder plane and cut it to fit, then waxed it. The brass strips had given up the ghost. I'm hoping the yellow glue holds better on the ebony than the epoxy did with the brass. I cleaned it with lacquer thinner just prior to gluing, and it appears to be nice and tight right now.
And I got some more mortices cut in the carving bench legs for the stiffeners. By Allah, I'll get that bench done this year if it kills me. Buddha knows, it's taken long enough. ;)
(No cracks about a certain bow saur, peanut gallery fans.)
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    Greetings and Salutations...
On Mon, 27 Sep 2004 14:58:34 -0700, Larry Jaques

    Well, for what it is worth, one of MY favorite books on the subject is Edith Diehl's "Bookbinding, Its Background and Technique". It is available from Dover Books for not TOO much money, and, is a pretty useful and comprehensive text. Kind of dense...but...a LOT of info.     here is one source... <http://www.powells.com/cgi-bin/biblio?inkey=1-0486240207-3 ;;slnc=1> And of course...Amazon <(Amazon.com product link shortened)>     Regards     Dave Mundt
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