Shower ceiling...maple.

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Hi there,
We are currently renovating our bathroom for which I have built a custom vanity complete a concrete counter top and vessel sinks. I've also built a tile shower and I was thinking of installing some maple tongue & groove (if it exsits) or maple veneer plywood on the shower ceiling to match the vanity. What do you guys think about this idea?
Link here is what it looks like: http://www.johnbridge.com/vbulletin/attachment.php?attachmentid 014&stc=1
Thanks for your input,
Marc
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http://www.johnbridge.com/vbulletin/attachment.php?attachmentid 014&stc=1
Nice shower, bad idea. If not available, you could certainly make your own shiplap or T&G maple. I would, however, be concerned that with all the moisture/heat of a shower, eventually there would some infiltration of water through the finish. Streaks of mildew would look partucularly bad on a light wood like maple.
To be fair, I think that it would look really sharp at first; I'm just not sure that it would stay that way.
-Steve
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Marc wrote:

Maple veneer plywood exists in an assortment of thicknesses. Typically this will not use exterior grade glue and will have poplar interior veneers. There is maple plywood made for lutherie that has maple interior veneers.
I doubt that you can get it in tongue and groove but you won't need more than one sheet to cover the ceiling of the shower unless it is some sort of gang shower more than four feet wide.
Neither maple, poplar, nor plywood are optimal choices for a damp location but if you seal it thoroughly on both faces all the edges and everywhere there is hole (like for a nail, screw, or fan/light box) it should last.
A friend has a shower with a tiled ceiling that looks to be the same tile as on the walls, if you want to consider alternatives.
--

FF


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i've done both tile and t&g cedar. tile's a (literal) pain to install on a ceiling.
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Keep wood out of the shower.
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Especially if you're alone :-) -- ******** Bill Pounds http://www.billpounds.com
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Thanks for the input guys...although everyone seems to agree I should keep the wood out of the shower all together. I'm just new to carpentry and woodworking but I would think if they can use wood extensively in the marine industry their must be a way to make this idea of mine work.
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The guys with wood on their boats are forever working on preserving the finish. I just stumbled across this.
http://www.woodworkingforwatercraft.com/teakfinish.html
Holly is used on boats and may have the color similar to maple. These guys could probably supply you with a holly veneer on an exterior ply that you could cut and trim to fit. Every 6 months apply more oil. I'll bet they could advise you if you are dead set on wood ceiling.

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If you want to draw that parallel, you would then have to be comfortable using copper-bottom paint on your shower ceiling...;-)
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So why did you ask for advice? If you're going to do it anyway, then just do it and don't ask.
The wood typically used in marine applications is teak not maple.
Keep in mind, the humid hot air will rise and attack the wood. Eventually you'll have a problem - but if you must use wood, put spar varnish on it.

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D Steck wrote:

In addition to 'if', there is also 'how'.

For decks, yes. Hulls are usually made of marine plywood which these days is usually Okoume, or Sapele, African woods that look a bit like mahogany, but do not have mahogany's rot resistance, or Doug Fir.

Most boatbuilders these days use epoxy finishes, often with spar varnish over the top to protect it from UV.

You can check the net or the local yellow pages to find somewhere to get boatbuilding epoxies used for boatbuilding. The "West System" epoxies are generally well-liked.
--

FF


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Marc wrote:

Salt water doesn't rot wood, fresh water does.
More accurately, the fungal spores that *cause* rot thrive in fresh water wet wood.
-- dadiOH ____________________________
dadiOH's dandies v3.06... ...a help file of info about MP3s, recording from LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that. Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
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dadiOH wrote:

Many, if not the majority of wooden boats, rowboats, canoes, kayaks etc, are used on freshwater lakes and rivers. There are plenty of big wooden boats out in the salt water but lots of the smaller stuff inland.
--

FF


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If it was me, I'd get some of the water-resistant laminate flooring with a maple reproduction on it. Real wood will be a problem in a shower.
Ken Muldrew snipped-for-privacy@ucalgazry.ca (remove all letters after y in the alphabet)
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http://www.johnbridge.com/vbulletin/attachment.php?attachmentid 014&stc=1
I'd stay away from wood, it will mildew over time. I'd suggest good paint (possibly oil based), or what I know as "barkerboard" masonite with a washable surface, sometimes with a tile pattern on it. Sealed around the edges of course. Or light 6x6 wall tiles. With the white tile adhesive they will stick and not move. It's a dark shower so the lighter the cieling the better.
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They use Western Red Cedar for saunas and steam rooms. Just be prepared for maintenance. However, I'm also remodeling my master bath and I'm going to tile the shower ceiling. I plan on raising and venting the shower ceiling to reduce moisture build up.
Dave
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Thanks for all of your responses. I've decided go for maple because of it's low tolerance for moisture. Perhaps some western cedar would be much better, as some have suggested.
Cheers,
Marc
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I can't imagine using maple in a wet environment like that. Take a look at the bamboo flooring that's now available. It would look beautiful and hold up much better in the shower.
Marc wrote:

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Ahh.. bamboo flooring.
The "bamboo" flooring I looked at once appeared to be *mostly* made of epoxy! It was quite heavy, smooth, expensive, and a little translucent.
I imagine though, if you could impregnate maple with enough epoxy, like the bamboo florring, it would probably hold up fine in the shower.
Some dude in the most recent FWW or Wood magazine thinks he expoxy-impregnated some outdoor furniture... might want to read up on that.

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pretty much decided to give up the idea of wood on the ceiling. I think I'll just go ahead and tile it with the same 16' X 16' slate I'll be using for the floor.
I've also had someone else suggested using western cedar but leaving it unfinished or oiled so that it can breath. Apparently cedar can absorb and release moisture fast enough to prevent mold....but who knows....
Cheers,
Marc
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