Shoulders For Angled Tenon??


What is the best way to cut the shoulders on a tenon cut at an angle?
Is it easiest to tilt the blade on the TS to the angle used and nibble? Is there a better way other than cutting them by hand? __________ /___ /___/ ________/
Thanks
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Jig (at the link), not terribly difficult to make, is so fixtured to allow its fence to swing through >30 degrees of arc. That is one router solution. http://www.patwarner.com/tenonmaker.html ________________________________________________________ stoutman wrote:

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Thanks Pat. I'm gonna try and make that jig and give it a go.
Thanks again!

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Pat's jig looks pretty good to me. I've done this on the TS and it is a real mess.
-- "We need to make a sacrifice to the gods, find me a young virgin... oh, and bring something to kill"
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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Back to basics.
The register of the shoulders against the mortised piece is the critical point of the joint. The rest is to keep it from racking out of register.
So make the long shoulder cuts with the most accurate means - the tablesaw with a sled, or a miter gage with sandpaper or a hold-down. You can use your cutoff sled with a wedge to ensure left/right concurrence.
Now to the tenon saw, where you'll cut parallel but proud of the tablesaw cheeks to allow you to trim with a sharp chisel.
If you've got one of those zero-set saws, you might be able to cut closer, but it's too easy to trim, and too ugly to see torn grain in the joint to tempt me.

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__________ /___<------------ /___/ ________/ <------------
the shorter of the shoulders is where i am having trouble. Unless I tilt the blade the tenon is ruined. The blade must be tilted in two different directions or the tenon must be flipped end for end to make the cuts. how do most be people cut them? By hand or with a router seem to be the best answers so far.

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The shorter is easily removed by hand sawing and trimming, as I suggested.
Amazing how stuff crops up, though. He does both ways - vertical and horizontal - with wedges. http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworking/pages/w00143.asp
Incidentally, you do know that a wedge on the right, moved to the left, guarantees the same angle, and the blade can stay the same?

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