Should I sell my craftman table saw?

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I'm a novice woodworker with an appreciation for precison. As a gift some years back, my wife bought me a craftsman 10" belt drive tablesaw. With almost every use, I have to adjust the saw for heeling and what a pain that is. Needless to saw, the fence system leaves a lot to be desired too.
Should I cut my loses and sell this saw and replace it with something more reliable? If I should, what would be a good replacement for it?
Thanks, Mike
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What is heeling? If you don't have the current fence, I would recommend upgrading the fence; you will save a lot of money and time.
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Okay, I looked up heeling. My craftsman is square and never needs adjusting. Are you sure you are doing it right?
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Yes, after replacing the fence you will need to replace the blade, the link belts, the pulleys, arbor, mitra, the outfeed, the extension, a mobile cabinet, the wheels, upgrade the motor, hardware.....
The TS is STILL under power ripping 6/4 hardwood. Might as well buy a reasonable price TS. At the end of the day you still have asked yourself the time and money spend is it worth it?
That is my personal experience :-)
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WD is correct. Many of us bought cheap thinking we would upgrade as time passed. Problem is (was) that ALL the changes need to be made NOW so that it will do what I needed it to do. So, I sold my Craftsman and bought a Delta Contractors saw with Unifence. Then, after noticing that it would flip over under a heavy piece I was trying to rip, I bought a UniSaw and LOVE it!!!!! Wish I had saved the time, trouble, frustration and MONEY by just biting the bullet and buying a good saw in the first place. From then on, I never buy anything except the best when I need something and have always appreciated that I did so. May do w/o a few tools for a while but am very satisfied with what I do have. And it is much safer as a result. Some will argue and I understand- but I did what I thouhgt was prudent and am content with teh results. Craftsman make an OK saw for the money; for MY use, it was sadly lacking but this may not hold true for others. For a farmer, they are just what the doctor order; for a cabinet maker or craftsman, they are a little short of what is desired. But then look at Steve Knight; I was shocked at what he works with and what he turns out. You have to make the decision.

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Mike,
I was in the same boat you are. I had a craftsman that I recently replaced with a Dewalt 746x. Things that used to take me 15 minutes because I had to fuss with the fence I now do in less than 5 minutes. Not to mention the cut quality is great.
I also checked out the comparably price Jet saw. I chose dewalt because it seemed to be put together a little better, and there is a dewalt service center 5 minutes from my house in case I have problems. I thought about a Unisaw but I didn't want to spend over $1000 dollars.
Anyway, whatever saw you upgrade to, the difference will be tremendous.
--Tom Wojeck

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A good fence would do it too. Tony

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Does this apply to a cheapo Delta TS? It's the $88 basic saw.
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HomeBrewer

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In your case, save the nameplate and upgrade the rest by sliding a bigger model under it. Ed snipped-for-privacy@snet.net http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
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*IF* you can figure out how to put a good fence on -that- thing, without tipping it over. *grin*
'benchtop' saws are best relegated to 'toy' tasks, pretty much regardless of make.
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HomeBrewer asks:

Probably not. Most good fences need a table in the close vicinity of 27" deep, with a flat front for fence rail attachment (and some require a parallel rear rail). Most $88 saws don't have the table material to support a good fence or are formed for the version of a fence that comes with the saw...built-in rails, more or less.
And it does seem a little unusual to commit something like $220 (and up) to a saw that costs so little.
A quick look at the Delta website shows the TS200. Is that the saw? It appears (and the picture is not good, so I'm not sure) to have a molded front rail for the fence. I can't make out the actual depth of the table from the web site--it's either 17-1/4" or 26". The latter would work, the former has to make you wonder why you bought the saw.
Charlie Self "Character is much easier kept than recovered." Thomas Paine
http://hometown.aol.com/charliediy/myhomepage/business.html
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yeah its a saw if you're a contractor that wants to rip down a 2x4 but any qualification after that is null.
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that
If you only want precision then you might look a fence upgrade but I think that you would be better off selling the saw and upgrading the whole package. I started with a saw that sounds similar to yours. Like you, I was interested in precision and was frustrated with the Craftsman saw. I upgraded to a Biesmeyer fence and loved it for a while. After purchasing the fence I started doing larger projects and ran into horsepower issues. I thought that I would sell the saw, and keep the fence, but I found that it was a better value to buy a Unisaw package deal with the Biesmeyer fence and rails than the stand alone saw. In retrospect, it would have been cheaper to skip the fence upgrade. If you think that you are going to continue with woodworking a primary hobby, I think that you will do better with a new saw/fence.
Bob McBreen
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I have a 20 year old direct drive Craftsman TS with a 1 1/8 h.p. motor. While I dream of the day I'll upgrade, it serves me very adequately for the furniture projects I make. What keeps it in favor is the heavy cast iron top and extension wings. I've replaced the fence with a Biesemeyer, which totally eliminated any accuracy problems. I also use a thin kerf teflon coated Freud blade, and can rip 8/4 hardwood with only an occasional bogging down of the motor. If you can afford it, go ahead and upgrade to a better saw, but the Craftsman with a few improvements is fine for most part-time woodworkers.

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well, what ever you buy to replace it, I know what your first project is...
New dog house, cause you'll be livin' in it! ;-)

that
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I have a craftsmen with the 12/24 rip fence and have aligned it numerus times, It just won't stay consistantly in the same place. I will probably buy an after market fence sooner or later. To align the blade you need to take the belt off the motor, the weight of the motor will keep pulling it out of alignment before you can get the bolts tightened. I suspect the trunnion may flex under a heavy load, ripping oak or other hard wood.
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Finally got my wife trained to NOT buy any woodworking or tech stuff for me, as I can be pretty picky about what I want/use. 'Tis better for her to say "Honey, I cann't think of anything to get you for your birthday/anniversary/etc, lets go to the local XYZ and let you pick out what you want" Keeps those domestic spats down to a very low number, as you note returning something lovingly bought can be a low point in a relationship
John
On Thu, 22 Jan 2004 02:57:09 GMT, "Fatty Mcgee"

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Mike, I would say at the very least you are depriving yourself of the full enjoyment of wood working. Having to compensate for a tool that does not stay aligned or a fence that doesn't set repeatedly is not only wasting a lot of enjoyment time, but I think it can approach being dangerous. A fence that doesn't stay aligned can wedge wood against the blade, one of the primary causes of kickbacks.
At a minimum, I think you should consider one of the good quality contractor style saws. This will mean spending $500-$600 minimum (counting shipping, tax etc.)
Bob

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On Thu, 22 Jan 2004 01:11:36 +0000, MSgt Mike wrote:

By all means.
My first saw was a Crapsman belt-driven model. I could never keep it aligned. It was so bad that I found myself realigning it before every cut.
I now have a Unisaw. No regrets. It was expensive, but I have been so delighted with it that I have already forgotten the price. So it is with good tools.
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In rec.woodworking

Interesting. I have a Craftsman belt drive that I'm pleased with. I am upgrading the fence because I want a T-square type fence and have had a bit of problems aligning this one in the past because there are no adjustments and alignment problems are inherent with a fence that grabs the back side of the saw. As for the blade alignment, I set it once.
I'm curious how a 90lb cast iron trunion secured by 4-5/16 bolts to a cast iron table is moving. I had a hard time moving mine with all the bolts loose.

I'm sure I'd be delighted with a Unisaw also but I can't justify that cost for a semi-serious hobby and my finicky personality. I may not give a hoot about woodworking in another year, you never can tell with me.
Bruce
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