Should I do 9' or 10' walls in a shop?

Page 1 of 2  

I'm in the planning stages for my shop building. My initial plans called for 9' walls with a vaulted ceiling so I would have plenty of overhead clearance.
Are 9' walls still enough clearance if I switch to a flat ceiling? Are 10' walls really worth all the extra lumber and heating/cooling expense?
In an ideal world, the walls would be 12 to 15 feet high, but I don't have the budget for that.
Brian Elfert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Brian Elfert wrote:

They would be from this guy's POV. I work under 7' ceilings. <G>
Remember, you're probably going to have lights, DC tubes, etc... hanging, so the extra space would be worth it for the net height.
I've found areas with higher ceilings easier to light, as the light can spread out more before it reaches bench and tool tops. You may need fewer lights with 10' vs. 9' ceilings.
You could always add some sort of ceiling fan(s) to help with heating and cooling.
10' ceilings... drool...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I forgot about DC piping. That was going to run up high in my vaulted ceiling. I should plan on 10' walls and can go back to 9' later if things change.
Brian Elfert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
writes:

Regarding DC plumbing, consider building a raised wood floor and run DC piping under that. I've seen that on a couple of websites and it looks like a very cool idea. What you lose by having a higher floor, you'd gain back by more clearance above, and you can run pipes under the floor to machines in the middle of the room without them being in the way as they would if dropped from the ceiling.
DC and electrical could go under the floor. Plus, that wood floor is going to have more give and be more comfortable over long shop sessions.
Of course, I speak from no experience with this (working in my 7' ceiling, concrete floor basement), but if I was building a shop from scratch, I'd probably want to work this idea in.
Good luck. And don't forget to leave bench space for cleaning skate bearings!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Keith Carlson wrote:

You could always simply build it over a basement, if basements work in your locale.
The heating & cooling mechanicals, DC & pipes, compressor, wiring, etc... would be simple to install or change. All lesser-used stuff could easily be stored below.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My original plan had a basement. I realized a basement would add way too much to the cost. The basement could be up to $20k or more.
My entire budget for this project is $30 to $35k.
Brian Elfert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My original plan actually called for a full 10" wood floor over the concrete. I needed to reduce the cost so I dropped back to plywood over treated 2x4 sleepers.
I doubt I would regret not having the full floor in the long run.
Brian Elfert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Brian Elfert wrote:

I've got almost 9' ceilings and find them too low.
Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

9' ceiling is sometimes too low for flipping big countertops. go for 10'. It will be a little easier to light, and if insulated properly, some recirc fans will make sure the heating bill won't increase.
A standard sheet of MDF measures 108 11/16" on the diagonal. You can't manipulate, freely, one of those in a 9' height.
Building tables and chairs won't give you any grief...unless you want to store those 12' cherry boards vertically..<G>
Make it 10 feet, Brian.....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

If you're framing, twobys come 8', 10' 12'....
You're gonna have to buy 10 footers anyway aren't you?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wes Stewart wrote:

You can also get sheetrock in other than 4x8 sizes to match...If I were going from scratch, I'd go the 10'.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

They make 104 5/8" precut studs in both 2x4s and 2x6s. 9' walls would be easier than 10' unless I don't cut the 10 footers and go to 10 1/2' or so.
Brian Elfert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It is going to depend on what the majority of your work is.
I make little music boxes so I could manage with a 7' ceiling.
If you are handling large cabinets, long countertops the extra height will give you clearance on overhead lights, heating ductowrk etc.
In my area the choice would be 8' or 10' for wall stud construction since those are the standard lengths available. Ceiling fans or a recirculating duct and fan will help your heating costs.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I'd like, but not need, high ceilings making dollhouse furniture. <G>
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I would do 10' with 2x6's as studs. The "extra" cost will not even be noticed and that extra room in the wall can be super insulated. Super strong and roomy. I have 12' ceiling and that is excellent. I truly regret not using 2x6's when I had the chance.
Brian Elfert wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm already ahead of you on the 2x6 studs. Energy costs aren't going down any time soon.
I am most likely going to go with 10' walls even though the expense is not insignificant. 10% more interior/exterior sheathing, siding, and studs are required which is at least $1000 additional. $1000 doesn't sound like much, but my budget for this building is tight.
Brian Elfert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Brian.. I know that you don't need help rationalizing, but use the same method that we use to justify tools... $1,000 over the life of the shop, minus the cost of light fixtures and stuff that you won't be breaking.. *lol*
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Someone suggested doing concrete block for the first 2 feet with an 8 foot wall on top and I'm going to look into that. It may be less expensive than extending a stick built wall to 10'.
I guess it will be better to spend $1000 now than regret it for 20 or 30 years.
Brian Elfert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I built my shop with 10' celings with 2x6 studs on recommendation of a neighbor. I don't regret it for a moment. I can flip 4x8 sheet goods end-for-end without hitting the lights (or DC system once I put one in) which I could not do with 8' or 9' ceilings. It's as cheap to do 10' as 9' and, with insulated 2x6 walls, you won't notice the difference in heating or cooling.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I went from a shop w. 8' ceilings to one with 14' ceilings. It took me .000008 seconds to get used to is.
Go for the 10'.
You won't regret it.
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.