Should I Condition Douglas Fir Before Staining?

We have about 900 sqft of old growth douglas fir that we will be taking up, planing, sanding, staining with Bonakemi Drifast Provincial, and topcoating with Bonakemi Traffic.
My question is whether we should use a conditioner on the wood since it is a softwood so that it excepts the stain evenly. Is there a good top of the line brand I should look for; I will be calling Bona on Monday to see what is compatible with their products.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
There's no way we can be sure, but my guess is YES.
I'd take some samples and try out the possible methods. No sense in having to strip misapplied stain from 900 sq. ft of timber.
Old Guy

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If it excepts it, you won't see it anyway.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes. I've tried straight boiled linseed oil, commercial conditioner, and various dilutions of boiled linseed oil, all work the same on my samples (spruce). Stain takeup without the conditioner was TERRIBLE especially around knots (if you do tests, include one or two knots or wild-grain areas in the test sample).
If I had to do it today, I'd use 1 part BLO and 3 parts thinner, and apply with no-lint rag.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks for the recommendation; concerning boiled linseed oil, would I buy straight linseed oil and boil it or should I buy "boiled linseed oil" that contains the metallic dryers. I don't want to by some mislabeled bottle sold as such and actually get a heat-treated only stand oil.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Good grief, buy "Boiled Linseed Oil"
I have a lot of admiration for people who REALLY make stuff from scratch, like they start with a tree and make a dresser. But for practical work it makes no sense.
You might_ try treating a sample with sodium hydroxide solution, (lye) the way cherry is artificially aged. You can google this group to see hows that it done. I like the effect, but it may not be the color you are after.
It is becoming harder here to buy sodium hydroxide off the shelf, thank goodness nobody makes illegal drugs from wood.
--
FF


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.