"Shortening" 3/4" plywood cabinets

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Greg Guarino wrote:

Snip
I generally do it with a hatchet. It has to be very sharp. First I snap a chalk line, enhance it with a magic marker and go to work. It helps if you cut through the veneer layer with a chainsaw, bow saw or similar instrument. Then, working slowly (as I always do), you use the hatchet to "sneak up on" the line. It is a lot of work, but most of us need more exercise anyway.
--
Gerald Ross

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Having to do this same task once or twice I elected to do it opposite way that most are saying, having an extension table in my TS, I pull the fence back to the needed height, and let the waste side fall free. I have found when cutting a larger piece the final can close the on the cut and the blade can remove material. Of course I was hand feeding because using a miter was not an opeion due to the size.
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On 2/15/2012 8:10 PM, SteveA wrote:

Agreed. and almost every one who has replied with a suggestion to use the table saw has indicated that is the safest method, I

That's the beauty of using the glue blocks to stabilize the offcut.
Most of those beautiful wooden boxes and chests you see with the perfect fitting lids are made with all six sides glued up _before_ the lid is cut off.
In order to get that perfect fit, you need a perfect cut, meaning you don't want to run even the slightest risk of an accidental bind ruining all your previous work .. generally meaning the top will no longer fit perfectly.
Enter the hot melt glue blocks, glued in the appropriate places before the top is glued on, and the box is closed up.
You can now run the whole shooting match through the table saw at the proper depth of cut, and the box retains its shape and integrity, with no danger whatsoever of a bind ... none.
It is an easy matter to use a small hand saw to saw through what's left of the hot melt glue blocks, and they come off with no damage to the box or top whatsoever.
--
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