ShopVac as dust collector

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How good of a "dust collection" solution is a 16 gallon "Shop Vac" (appropriately adapted from 2.5" to 4") with a good filter for a table saw (for a hobbyist)? Basically adequate?
Thank you, Bill
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You will likely get some different "opinions" but I would say it would be OK. A table saw doesn't generate much volume compared to a planer or router, etc. Also it is all fine dust. I would keep the 2.5" size as much as possible and just expand to the larger size at the very last to keep the air speed up to carry the fine dust.
I think you won't have enough juice to pull much of what is coming off the top of the blade but it should be ok for inside the box. Also. I am assuming contractors or table top saw.

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wrote:

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Bill wrote:

Nah, my router table has a connection for the 2" shop vac hose. Gets MOST of the dust.
As for the table saw, consider this table saw dust bag:
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?ItemnumberE794
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Bill wrote:

I've been pretty happy with this cobbled-up arrangement...
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/Projects/MiniCyclone /
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Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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Works just fine.
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Ehh it'll work for a router but might have trouble keeping up if you are really throwing the chips, just depends on what your doing. But a planer for sure needs lots o' CFM or the chips start winding back into the cutting plane and you end up with problems.

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wrote:

I have that exact (basic) setup (mine might be a 12 gallon). I have a pipe running to my table saw (Powermatic contractor saw), and my multi purpose station (drill press, 9" band saw, miter saw, grinder, homemade 18X20 downdraft box, etc.) and to a home made router table/outfeed table for the table saw. I also run one detachable hose to the 14" bandsaw, a 13" Ryobi planer, and a 6" Toolkraft jointer. With some, I need to go back and (by hand) run a hose over stuff that didn't end up getting caught but it's minimal (and I don't even bother with the lathe). It beats the heck out of having nothing, but that's all I have to compare it to. I'm sure a real dust collector would be better but I'm happy for now.
Ed
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Fine Woodworking last issue said that making the slot in the throatplate wider at the heel end reduces the amount of dust thrown up from the blade. Widening the slot lowers the vacuum pressure by reducing air velocity alongside the spinning blade, I'd guess.
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wrote:

Fine Woodworking last issue said that making the slot in the throatplate wider at the heel end reduces the amount of dust thrown up from the blade. Widening the slot lowers the vacuum pressure by reducing air velocity alongside the spinning blade, I'd guess.
Maybe it's related to the "Venturi Effect". This is probably just a fancy name what you just said... To me (NOT an expert), it seems like the downward flying wood chips would be causing the difference in air pressure. I can't quite sense how the spinning blade would do it by itself because of the symetry of the blade with respect to the table. Again, I am merely guessing about things I am not informed about.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Venturi_effect
Bill
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I built a closed base for my Skil benchtop saw and have a port for my Shopvac with a homemade cyclone inline.
It's better than nothing, but I still wear a mask when cutting MDF or any irritant hardwood.
So, yeah, basically adequate, kinda, sorta, not really.
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You are sucking dust from a relatively large area as opposed to being connected to a router, sander , or router fence. to tell you the truth my 1100 CFM DC does not get every thing that my TS produces. I seriously doubt you would like to compare the results of a DC to a shop vac. Then consider all that noise you would have to listen to.
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My shop vac is quieter than my DC. Tip; when shopping for a shop vac, buy a quiet one.
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I use a Festool shop vac, and while quieter than my dust collector, my DC is probably much quieter than 90% of the typical shop vacs out there. When shopping for a DC, buy a quiet one. ;~)
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I ordered the 16.5 gallon model sold at Sears this evening. It also works as a "leaf blower" at the rate of 265 ft^3/min. It received pretty good reviews, though not necessarily for being a leaf blower.
It was on sale for $20 off and I had a 10% off coupon (so $90+tax). I registered with the new "Sears Community" (or something like that), and got the coupon by email after a few days (and I'm sure you can get one too :) ).
I don't move into my first house until next month, but I decided this ShopVac would probably make a helpful tool for my "new garage/yard" no matter what I do about handle dust collection...no doubt there is an evolutionary process to the whole thing...
A number of thoughtful responses were provided. I am grateful for your willingness to share your ideas and experience!
Thanks, Bill
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Bill wrote:

Not the best leaf blower in the universe but works much, much better than you might expect.

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Snip
.

Yes, much better than a broom, but that tail tends to hamper the savings of time when considering total time needed to do the yard work.
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Leon wrote:

A while back I picked up a couple of 100' 12/3 cords and that hasn't really been much of an issue since. Don't use it often for that purpose but in the fall it's a godsend.
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Mr. Clarke, This is in reply to your message from 6/25/09.
I just wanted to affirm your opinion that the ShopVac works much better than I might have expected as a leaf blower! I was so satisfied I bought a good (guage 12) 100' extension cord.
Picked up their $19.99 "gutter blower/vacuum accessory recently too. I think it will pay for itself the first time I use it.
Great value in the shop vac, IMO.
Bill
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Bill wrote:

Been there, done that. One simple question, "You trying to keep your shop neat or get rid of the dust?"
It will grab the big stuff (i.e., the stuff you can see) but it is the little stuff that will do you in. One other simple question, "You want to spend the money now, keeping the dust out of your lungs, or do you want to spend it later trying to get your lungs working again?" The choice is yours, but a fairly good dust collection set up cost a whole lot less than a couple of trips to the doctor for lungs that don;t work so good any more.
Deb
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