Shopsmith pricing

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OK, so you are saying there were 2 saws, the contractor and the Unisaw. I stand corrected, I never noticed the Unisaw. The contractors saw probably stood out more for me as during the beginning years I was interested in getting a Delta Contractors saw that was sitting around at work not being used.

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While I'm picking on you. You have a type-o, the 6th season was in 1994. This year is the beginning of the 16th season. I don't know where the 90's went either.. ;~)
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On Sat, 28 Feb 2004 01:27:21 GMT, "Leon"

Got me. I do that frequently for some reason. The show premiered in 1989, maybe that's what throws me.
My real problem (as with most people my age) is the '60s are a mystery to me, too.
- - LRod
Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
Shamelessly whoring my website since 1999
http://www.woodbutcher.net
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90's
LOL.. When I discuss automobiles with my 16 year old son I always refer to the Viper being introduced in the 80's.
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Hey Mike,
If you don't mind me asking, what is the accuracy like? It's one thing to be able to change from one use to another, but what about tuning it after the change over.
I've never owned one, not looking to buy one, but always wondered how well things were set up (square fences/blade, runout etc...)
Cheers,
Aw
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I have had one for 50+ years and still use it all the time. Accuracy seems very good, although I do have to "tune" it every several years. Back then, they didn't have all the attachments they do now so I do have a separate band saw and planer. Working on the second motor but other than that it performs great.
Chuck Callaghan snipped-for-privacy@virginia.edu

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I'm not Mike, but I'll chime in here:
The biggest problem I had with mine (Model 520) was that there was always SOMETHING that hadn't been fully tightened, readjusted, squared, calibrated or tweaked on a changeover. If I left it as a saw, or a sander, or a drill press or a whatever, got it right, and used it, it was just fine. I seemed always to miss something in the changeover that compromised accuracy.
What got the crowbar to the wallet, and a new Unisaw in the garage/shop, was trying to build a relatively simple bathroom vanity with the Shopsmith as the tablesaw. Amazing how just a couple of not-dead-square cuts will screw up a cabinet.
The Shopsmith went to my son's place at college last summer. He's enjoyed learning with it, on small projects. The instruction guides are really good for a beginner. The machine will likely return in May, when I anticipate that I will try my hand at woodturning.
I have a good number of friends who have done many, entirely acceptable projects on their Shopsmiths.
Mine was purchased new, at a home & garden fair. ("I've learned that lesson now", he says, chagrined.)
Enjoy the journey.
Patriarch, who has almost as many tools, and probably has paid just as much, if not more, than Bay Area Dave, for the privelege. Not complaining, though.
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MY wallet got pried open after several cabinet projects that were just too uncomfortably big for the table on my '88 Model 500. They got done, but it was too much of a balancing act. Second drawback was the lack of a scale for the fence - measuring for every cut with a tape or rule introduced too many opportunities for errors. Still, I managed to build quite a few nice projects in a 8'x10' basement shop, where there simply was not room for individual machines.
I do not feel that changing functions causes any need for tuning type adjustments (square, parallel, etc). I can switch it around all day and still get square, smooth rips and crosscuts You do need to remember to tighten all the appropriate clamps (motor, table base, table height, table tilt, auxiliary tables, etc).
I've since moved to a bigger shop (and lot and house and mortgage) where I have room for a stand alone cabinet saw, RAS, band saw and jointer. The Shopsmith is still used for nearly every project. The table that is too small as a saw table is fine for a drill press, and generous for a disc or drum sander. The lathe is fine when I need it, and the 4" jointer is OK for shorter pieces.
If you lack space, the Shopsmith is great, but look for a used one. $3K is too much.
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Hi Aw
Don't mind you asking at all. I've done everything from building two shops, well, one and a major rebuild of another, to building jewelry boxes, cradles, and turning pens on mine and accuracy was never a problem nor, once you get used to it is, set ups. Even the most radical reconfiguration doesn't take me more then a minute, two at the most.
As with any multi function machine there are compromises made, but Shopsmith didn't make them in quality or ability to do fine woodworking. The ones that were made, notably the size of the table when in the saw function mode, can be worked around easily enough with a sled but most of the time even that isn't necessary..
Take care.
--
Mike G.
snipped-for-privacy@heirloom-woods.net
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I'm retiring soon and was also looking at the Shopsmith as I'd like to take up woodworking as a hobby. If I go the dedicated machine route instead what do you recommend I get?
--
Don



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Don wrote:

How much do you want to spend? A shop can be equipped for a couple of thousand or over ten housand with little hesitation. It also depends on the projects you want to undertake. Birhouses require much less than making fine furniture.
A medium budget shop will have: Contractor saw with good fence and cast iron wing(s) $750 to $900. (Delta, Jet, Grizzley) Drill press, at least a 12" bench top $180 (Delta) Planer $300 to $450 (Delta, DeWalt) Jointer $300 to $550 (Bridgewood, Delta, Jet) Router or two $150 and up Router table $10 for a cheapie home made to $800 with lift, drawers, etc. Dust Collector $280 Sander. Either a Ridgid spindle/belt combo or oscillating spindle $200 Bandsaw $500 and up for a 14" model.
--
Ed
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"Don" <dbitzerATcomcastDOTnet> wrote in message

take
what
If you have the room, I highly recommend dedicated machines. Brand name should suite you well. One of the things that I dislike about the Shopsmith and the clones like it is table saw set up. The table saw setup will probably be what you use 90% of the time. IMHO in the table saw set up the table is WAY TOO high off the floor and the table is WAY TOO SMALL for large pieces of wood. The demo "shows" seldom if ever show cutting a sheet of plywood or an 8 or 10' board.
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"Don" <dbitzerATcomcastDOTnet> wrote in

Two thoughts, from someone who has been there, and has the receipts to prove it:
* Find a woodworking class in your area. Adult education, local high school, community college, something. What you will learn is priceless. The people you will meet are priceless. And what you will save in buying blurfls will fund a great many projects, whether they be woodworking projects, or activities with the loved ones. And you will find out what you like, and have talent for building.
* You will also find out where/how/what to buy used in your area. Most good woodworking gear doesn't wear out in a lifetime of use. You very likely will find some, not all, very serviceable equipment, for the portion of the hobby that you will discover you enjoy, without having to pay new retail. There are those in our community who have the the reputation of being cheap. Think of it as applied thrift.
Good Shopsmiths are available used all of the time. If that is what you want to use, then the difference between used and new will load up a lumber rack with some very nice materials.
My talents and resources changed after I dropped the big money on the new Shopsmith. I took the first of now six classes at the local adult education, and am now well down the slippery slope.
But is it ever a great slide!
Patriarch
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patriarch wrote:

I mentioned the ads earlier. This week's Reminder paper has for the first time, a Delta contactor's saw with Unifence, but is also had One B-D saw, Four Craftsman RAS, Three Craftsman table, and FIVE Shopsmiths.
While I hardly ever see things of real interest, not a week goes by that does not have Craftsman table saws and Shopsmiths. My guess is that people buy cheap saws at Sears and never use them, and others see the demo of the Shopsmith and think it looks like a great hobby and buy one. They get caught up in the moment and don't really find out what they need or want to do.
I went the cheap saw route and then decided to stick around and upgraded.
--
Ed
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Hi Don
That's too much of an open question with too many variables for anyone, except by luck, to give you an answer that best suits you. If you are completely new to woodworking you are not going to have the knowledge to asses the recommendations.
I'd suggest you make a careful and unbiased survey of the location where you are going to work. Some of the things to consider is power available, ventilation, suitability for creating dust and noxious fumes (woodworking is pretty good at both), actual work space (for assembly) after a work bench has been put in and the impact of stand alone tools vs. other types, storage both for stock, tools not being used at the moment, finishing supplies, and a myriad of other things that generally occupy space in the shop, and of course heat/air.
While you are doing that I'd also suggest a trip to the library for some books on the basics as well as a trip to the local news stand to get every magazine on the subject. Subscribe to a couple that you are comfortable with and order every free catalog you find listed.
Check and see if there are any adult ed classes for woodworking locally and take one if there is. It's a great way to actually try the tools under supervision without laying out a lot of cash. If you have a woodworking store locally drop in, poke around, get to know the staff and ask them about, and check the phone book for, any local clubs or guilds.
Finally, once you think you have some idea of the basics start small on you projects and don't buy a tool till you need it, understand why you need it, and are aware of all the options available to perform the functions of that tool. There are almost always at least three. Try to challenge yourself a bit more with each project.
It should be noted that another drawback in off the cuff tool recommendations is that just about every woodworker I know finds a niche, a certain type of project that they prefer over others and that niche can effect emphasis of your tool buying and where the bulk of the tool budget goes.
Good luck
--
Mike G.
snipped-for-privacy@heirloom-woods.net
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