Shop wiring and lighting

Page 1 of 2  
I have been applying myself to getting the wiring installed in the shop, so far the only part completed is the 120V for outlets.
All ran in emt, with 2 gang handy box every ten feet around the perimeter, making it impossible to get more than 5 feet from 2 duplex outlets. They are even closer in some areas where high usage is likely. Making a total of 40 duplex outlets. I may put a row of drops down the center of the roofline in addition to wall outlets, they would be handy but also possibly in the way at times.
I despise having to look for a place to plug something up.
One 2 circuit 10ga 240v line is complete along the back wall to provide power to the bandsaw and planer, neither of which is in place or hooked up presently. They are currently living on my back porch, should be in their new home shortly.
I will run another double 240V circuit along part of the front wall one to provide power to a new table saw ( if I ever decide what to buy) and another just for future use.
I have ran many tens of thousands of feet of conduit in the distant past, but it took me a while to get back in the swing of bending conduit. Kinda like riding a bike, you never forget but it's a little shaky at first.
also left to do is two runs for 3 phase, presently I have 6 pieces of 3 phase equipment that will be powered by a rotary converter.
I've tried to stick with the rules on the wiring with the exception of GFI breakers, so it would fail inspection on that point.
Which brings us to lighting, I'm still using a strip of carnival lights for temporary lighting, which cosist of 25, 100 watt equivalent CFL bulbs, this works and is a lot of light but it looks like and is shit, time for permanent lighting.
I've pretty much settled on 6 low bay 400 watt metal halide. I considered 400 watt equiv led lights but just can't bear the expense right now, pay me now or pay me later. They are making mogul base leds that will screw in metal halide fixtures after bypassing the ballast, so hopefully the price of leds will come down by the time the metal halide fixtures fail. If all that happens I can replace them one at the time.
basilisk
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/17/2014 9:23 AM, basilisk wrote:

In our warehouse we had metal halide and the power company paid us to take them out and replace them with 4 tube high efficiency fluorescent. The ones we had were 1000 watt and we are getting better light with less than 200 watts.
The old lights had bulbs that cost $100 too. Now, all four would cost about $16.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/17/2014 9:32 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

lights come on quickly rather than taking 10-15 to warm up.
--
Jeff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/17/14, 8:40 AM, woodchucker wrote:

Keep in mind how lighting affects the hues in your finishes. Many artificial light sources make it next to impossible to see what your finish will actually look like in natural or normal household lighting. Fluorescent and halide being the worst offenders.
I spent the extra money on fluorescent tubes that give off light the color of an overcast day which is not too warm and not too cool, and certainly not that gross green of most fluorescent tubes.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 17 Feb 2014 10:22:27 -0600, -MIKE- wrote:

I use shop lights and have found that a combination of one "standard" cool white tube and one GE "kitchen and bath" tube (more red) come pretty close to house lighting with incandescents.
But incandescents are on their way out ...
--
Where have all the flowers gone? Pete Seeger 1919-2014

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 17 Feb 2014 17:08:14 +0000 (UTC), Larry Blanchard wrote:

Indeed, my living room has a mix of CFL, Led and incandescent light, if you want to know what color something is you have to go outside.
It may be a moot point anyway, I was born without whatever it is that regulates color matching and color suitability.
basilisk
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/17/2014 4:39 PM, basilisk wrote:

we have that female gene.
--
Jeff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/17/14, 1:19 PM, Mike Marlow wrote:

I wasn't even thinking about matching colors. I was thinking purely esthetics.
We are working in an art form and we naturally just see colors in our own minds as beautiful or not. That is drastically affected by light and is skewed by the hue, as it were. :-) In anything else we do in woodworking, all we need is *enough* light, the color doesn't matter. If we can see the shapes and textures we are making, that is all that matters. But with color, why start off at such a terrible disadvantage? In the long run, it's a drop in the bucket to get some decent colored lighting like you and I did.
Personally, I'm not going to check out the lighting in a home where something I build is going. If they have florescent lighting, that's their problem. *Every*thing in that room will be ugly. :-)
That's what always cracks me up about these home stores in a warehouse type setting with terrible lighting. Whether it's flooring and tile, or furniture, or whatever, even a beautiful product is going to look ugly under those terrible green and orange and yellow lights.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/17/2014 2:38 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

I used the "pink" crayon for coloring grass in coloring books until I learned how to read, but there's something about the lighting that grocery stores put above their produce, particularly the bananas, that offends my eye.
--
eWoodShop: www.eWoodShop.com
Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 17 Feb 2014 09:32:23 -0500, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I disregarded fluorescents on two counts, the number of fixtures required, I've a bit of a lazy streak, rather hang 6 fixtures rather than 18 and for some inexplicable reason fluorescents have a very short life span here, doesn't seem to be a grounding issue as I have several more ground rods driven in than required and they are in high iron content soil. The voltage runs high here but not enough that it should be a problem, sometimes hitting 130v. Who knows what goes on with the power when no one is looking.
It is bad enough that the tought of keeping a bunch of fluorescents operational is daunting. Of course there is no guarantee that metal halide won't be plagued by the same problem, spend your money and take your chances.
basilisk
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/17/2014 9:54 AM, basilisk wrote:

No need for 18 fixtures. We replaced them one for one and have plenty of good light. We also have 6 tube fixtures in the production area. Bright as being outside on a sunny day.
As for the short life span, that is a different issue.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
basilisk wrote:

"Ed Pawlowski" wrote:

Having designed and sold a lot of industrial lighting systems in a past life, will offer the following:
Metal halide is a good lamp source if you are an automotive dealership or a sports stadium.
Color rendition is good and the hours of operation are limited.
Metal halide is a POOR lamp source if you are an industrial area.
Metal halide has high initial lumen output; however, they have short useful life and high lumen depreciation.
Ed Pawlowski's suggestion of 4 tube high efficiency fluorescent luminaires is a good one.
Run 2 circuits to each fixture and you can easily have 2 level lighting.
Have fun.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
basilisk wrote:

"Ed Pawlowski" wrote:

"Lew Hodgett" wrote:

An update:
4 tube high efficiency fluorescent luminaires are available in a 1 x 4 tube configuration used in "troffer" fixtures for office lighting in a 24" x 48" luminaire and a 2 x 2 tube configuration used for industrial lighting in a 12" x 96" luminaire.
Either luminaire has 4 lamps and 2 ballasts in a single unit.
My choice would be the 12" x 96" luminaire laid end to end to form a row for a shop.
Using 2 circuits, you can wire alternate lamps on a circuit providing a 50% and 100% lighting for the whole shop.
Have fun.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/17/2014 2:10 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

want less light. I have 2 ckts, but it's to different units. Would have made sense to make it 2 or 4 bulbs.
--
Jeff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/17/2014 8:23 AM, basilisk wrote:

Appears you've done a great job thus far.

I always put them in where they are required, figuring I'm not going to live forever and, third party inspections being a guarantee in this area prior to resell, it is one less thing I'll have to address for selling when I may not be able to do so easily. Problematic in their early stages, I have literally had no problems with GFCI receptacles/breakers in the shop the last few years.

Good plan ... looks like you're on the right track.
--
eWoodShop: www.eWoodShop.com
Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 17 Feb 2014 08:39:25 -0600, Swingman wrote:

Thanks for the kind words, it seem to take forever for me to finish anything, working 60 hours a week for someone else slows me down for some reason.

I've never really been sold on them from a practical stand point. I doubt they have ever saved anyone, except maybe the toaster in the bathtub crowd. I do have some in the kitchen and baths.
For the reasons you stated it makes sense to put them in up front.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/17/2014 10:15 AM, basilisk wrote:

pump. And it was fine on the gfci, then it started popping it. Clearly it could have saved my ass. Before I replaced the pump I ran a cord to a non-gfci ckt. I just made sure I unplugged it b4 doing any work there. Also when cutting concrete with an old metal cased circ saw, made sure it was in use, since I also used slight spraying of water to keep the dust down... while it didn't pop, it was nice knowing I had the protection.

--
Jeff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You might want to consider something like this...
In one of my photography studios I got the light cords off the floor by stringing fine cable - 1/16th IIRC - wall to wall, tensioned a bit with small turnbuckles. There were six cables, three about 6 feet from each side of the 20' wide room, My electric cords went up one wall, then into a series of loops, each of which was attached to a nylon traveler (slide) on a cable. A short piece of coil cord was spliced into the end of each electric wire.
With this setup I could move any of the 6-8 lights to any place in the studio. I could also get them all out of the way. I could also just unplug a light and move it elsewhere as the end of the coil cord - when retracted - was a bit less than an arms reach above my head; when extended, tthe coil cords would reach (or nearly reach) the floor.
Worked for me, plan to do something similar in my shop, only 1-2 lines though.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 17 Feb 2014 14:24:55 -0500, dadiOH wrote:

That's not a bad idea.
basilisk
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You know I only ran 2 240V circuits to the back in my shop initially. One for the air compressor I still don't have to replace the CH roll around, and one for a table saw. Now I have 2 240V welders back there and a 230V CNC Mill, and will soon add another 230V CNC mill back there. Also maybe a large bed CNC router with a 230V spindle. I never thought in a million years I would have so much fabrication equipment in my shop. Lots of 120V outlets is fine, but plan a few extra 240V circuits as well. You never know.
--
This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection is active.
http://www.avast.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.