Shop Wall and Electric

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I do not know about your rules and regualtions of your communnal type residential association or the politics of your state or governing body responsible for building / electrical inspections.
Where I am, the electrical rules and inspections are governed by the Province, although the national electrical code is the basis for the provincial Code. The building Inspector is a local guy enforcing local municipal Code based on the Provincial building Code...LOL
When the electrical Inspector comes in he will inspect the wiring asked to inspect. He doesn't care about structural building items or wiring that may be existing, non-conforming. It's really not his business unless things get politically dirty...maybe? He may make recommendations but unless he sees something really, immediately, dangerous, he won't get involved. Just paying the fee and calling him in they figure you are the consciencious type, usually.
As far as map, sketches and plans, these things are really only for the Building Inspector and Building Dept. of the Municipality. They would involve structural soundness and asthetic issues for the neighbourhood look and feel. Wiring is not usually wanted on the drawings nor is it used by most electricians on the job. Industrial is usually the exception. I have seen many people spend a lot of time making drawing for the electrician only to have the guys on the job totally ignore it and do it "their way". This usually works out better anyway after seeing room formation and determining "Ergo" layout flow of the usage. Specific weird wiring quirks are the exception for clarity.
"and closed up" means after the fictures are all closed up. This looks to me like "childproofed". No open wiring or electrical contact points that anybody could touch by accident.
When I "pushed" my third inspector to inspect my solar PV system he ran to his vehicle, saying I hadn't paid for the inspection, to look at his database. "Yeah, you have paid, it will he fine". He was more woriied they got paid for it than looking at it. I had definite no-nos that he should have jumped on me for. They look for knowledge and general attitude in your work the they run to try to keep up with the clock, here.
YMMV https://www.hubbellnet.com/max_htm/tech_stuff/NEMA/front.html

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Year's ago, before GFCI were common/required, and before GFCI extension cords were available, I made a 4 foot cord with a GFCI receptacle in a exterior receptacle box.
I'd plug it into an outlet and then plug extension cords into it.
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news:f21f27d9-a45a-4451-850f- Year's ago, before GFCI were common/required, and before GFCI extension cords were available, I made a 4 foot cord with a GFCI receptacle in a exterior receptacle box.
I'd plug it into an outlet and then plug extension cords into it.
Nice idea. i think that half of the fun of this craft is the ingenuity it spawns.
Bill
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Dedicated 240VAC Circuits using 10GA is what I would suggest.
Not at all sure why you would run 120VAC outlets near the floor in a shop unless you have a specific tool in mind.
Someone suggested a ceiling outlet. I have one every four feet or so running two independantly switched circuits - one for my fans and the other (using three and four-way switches) for the shop lighting. One oulet on the lights circuit could be extended to the location of your table or shelving where your battery charger (tv or radio) will sit. This allows you to connect the chargers (drill, wireless phone, etc) and shut them down when you leave the shop. The compressor might also be on a switched circuit to prevent it from leaking down and recharging at three AM.
If you have a bench up against a wall (I saw none in your pdf), the idea of running outlets along the front edge is one I fully support and have implemented using power strips run under the table and up into the wall outlets.
120VAC outlets every 4 feet along the walls and six or eight inches above the highest work surface makes lots of sense and, again, I have implemented the approach in every shop I've built. For a little more cash, you can gang two duplex outlets at each location "just in case."
I ran 8GA to the shop breaker box and breakers for each circuit.
GFCI can be done at the breaker box, but is not needed in dry location and can be a pain if the GFCI pops at one end of the shop when you are using something at the other. If you do get one, look for those with an Indicator LED. You only want one for a circuit, the other outlets "hang" off it.
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On 7/05/10 10:54 PM, Hoosierpopi wrote:

There is also the unwritten rule of putting outlets at about 50" above the floor, so sheet goods will not block access to them.
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Also, in case you want to put your workbench in front of them.
There is also the unwritten rule of putting outlets at about 50" above the floor, so sheet goods will not block access to them.
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It's not a rule, but it's definitely written. It's one of my favorite "DOs" when someone asks about outlet placement and the like. (I suggest 54" to be sure the whole box clears if the installer measured from the top.)
Puckdropper
--
Never teach your apprentice everything you know.

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"Hoosierpopi" wrote:

#10AWG /W/ 2P-30A c'bkr will provide the lowest cost of ownership over the life of the system for 240VAC circuits.
Same can be said for #12AWG /W/ 1P-20A c'bkr for 120VAC circuits.
Lew
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You can run 10ga if you want, but regular romex works just as well. The up side is that you do not have to buy any special wire. The white and black are both hot and the bare wire is your neutral. I have my tablesaw, lathe and welder wired that way and have had for quite some time.
Deb
Hoosierpopi wrote:

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OMG! Don't do that one! The bare wire should never be a current carrying (neutral) wire.
What did you use for equipment case ground?
You can run 10ga if you want, but regular romex works just as well. The up side is that you do not have to buy any special wire. The white and black are both hot and the bare wire is your neutral. I have my tablesaw, lathe and welder wired that way and have had for quite some time.
Deb
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On 7/06/10 12:04 AM, Dr.Deb wrote:

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Please explain, in detail, exactly what you imagine is dangerous.
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On 7/06/10 12:38 AM, Doug Miller wrote:

Bare neutral instead of ground. No mention of proper tagging of the white as a hot.
For a pure 220V circuit it may be safe, but the bare is a ground, and wrap red tape on the ends of the white so it is *really* obvious if someone else ever opens that box.
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He's talking about a 240V circuit -- there is no neutral. He incorrectly referred to ground as neutral, but it's still a ground, and it's perfectly OK for it to be bare.

Technically, that's a Code violation, but it hardly qualifies as dangerous IMHO.

No. *Is* safe.

True.
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On Jul 6, 7:30am, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

12/2? I've always used a sharpie to paint the white, red.
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Use the black and white for the two hot legs. The bare is not to be used for a current carrying conductor...against the code(s) and DANGEROUS. In addition to many other dnagers of this you would not have a case ground for your electrical boxes and frames of equipment. Not a good idea and an inspector would make you take it all out and kick your ass hard!
I would run a 12/3 or 10/3 cable to have a neutral in case I wanted to install a device needing a neutral in a mind or usage change, later on. Then you would have red and black for hots and white for neutral, bare for ground.

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...and this has exactly what to do with anything I've said?

How many tools do you know that need a neutral? I suppose there are some with 120V lights, but there is a significant cost difference between /2 and /3 cable.
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Apparently I misthreaded on the last one.
While we are giving out advise to run way too much copper everywhere for an under 15 amp woodworking shop in a garage...
Running the 3 conductor now would be cheaper than opening the walls to run it later because he wants a 120v dust collector or a block heater for his car in that corner.
I would run a 12/3 or 10/3 cable to have a neutral in case I wanted to install a device needing a neutral in a mind or usage change, later on. Then you would have red and black for hots and white for neutral, bare for ground.
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I musta missed that thread. Who in their right mind would plan on running an entire shop on 15A? Who would use a 15A circuit for anything other than lighting?

Just make sure there are plenty of *20A* circuits around. Last I checked 12/3 was about 2x the cost of 12/2. Nope, not buying it.

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Not that I've ever seen.

Same here. Red or black.
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