shop progress

Rain finally let up long enough for block work to begin.
http://www.woodwrangler.net/newshop.html
basilisk
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wrote:

Oh, job supervisor. I was gonna say, Luther doesn't look nearly strong enough or large enough to swing that block onto the wall.
Congrats on more progress.
-- The most powerful factors in the world are clear ideas in the minds of energetic men of good will. -- J. Arthur Thomson
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On Wed, 05 Sep 2012 15:23:32 -0700, Larry Jaques wrote:

Thanks, I meant to warn the masons what a vicious overlord they would have to deal with, maybe he didn't deal them too much misery.
basilisk
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wrote:

A couple pats on the head or scratches of the neck, or a doggie biscuit would have made short work of that evil supervisor, huh?
-- The most powerful factors in the world are clear ideas in the minds of energetic men of good will. -- J. Arthur Thomson
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On 9/5/2012 5:24 PM, basilisk wrote:

Where are you located? Around here we put footings in, build the structure, then pour the floor.
I have not seen a floor poured and then the block built on top of it.
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On Wed, 05 Sep 2012 19:40:19 -0400, tiredofspam wrote:

Alabama, slab on grade, common construction method here as frost heaving is practically nonexistent. House built on grade would have footings poured, 2 or 3 high block perimeter layed with form blocks and then floor poured with wood framing going up from there.
Light commercial and garages, etc, are built just as I am doing.
basilisk
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Betcha it's going up too slow he? You could put a dozen people on it and it would still go up too slow.
As to Luther, I'm thinking he's found himself a new dog house. :)
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On Thu, 06 Sep 2012 02:37:21 -0400, Dave wrote:

Yeah, It would be great if it was finished now, I'm building this mostly out of income and only a little from savings, expensive parts of the work will have to slow to a crawl after block work is done.
That gives me time to get the roll up door lintels poured, electrical trenched in and water run while funds build back up.

Luther was near wild, starved and hairless when my wife caught him a couple of years ago, she got bit numerous times in the process. Since that time, Luther has become enlightened to the benefits of being a pet, consumate beggar and constant companion.
basilisk
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And who said dogs are dumb?
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On 9/6/2012 8:12 AM, basilisk wrote:

You didn't run water and electric lines before pouring the concrete? You going to saw the slab apart??? Dig under the edge?????
If you are going to do that stuff, why not do it before you pour?
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tiredofspam <nospam.nospam.com> wrote:

Why? The only thing you normally run under a slab on grade in most parts of the country (US) is sewer lines .. If there are no toilets, sinks or showers, no real need to run anything.
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On 9/6/2012 8:43 PM, Swingman wrote:

So you run your water lines above grade? Maybe down there where there are no freezing temps, But here it is run underground. And if slab construction, under the slab.
If you have a basement the pipes ingress is about 3 -4 feet below the grade into the wall.
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tiredofspam <nospam.nospam.com> wrote:

Makes sense with a basement, but we're discussing a slab on grade. Water lines in most modern residential slab on grade construction these days are indeed generally run underground to the slab, then tied into the house plumbing with an insulated riser and cutoff valve.
An expensive scenario for a homeowner with a slab on grade is a broken water pipe _under_ said slab ... although it was once common, it has proven to be overall a patently foolish practice in most areas, makes little sense in asking for that kind of trouble.
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Mine isn't. Its run under the slab to (under) the manifold. The water line in my VT house ran under the basement floor, then up to the shut-off. Th6e frost line can really go down (over 7' some years).

Yet it's done all the time. I have Pex run under the slab, in this house, too.
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On 9/6/2012 11:41 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Yep, can't argue with that, but not as much as previously. Builder's have been moving away from the practice in many areas for the last ten or fifteen years. AAMOF, about ten years ago it is was a hot topic at building seminars, particularly those put on with any kind of EEBA influence for building practices in the various climate zones in the US.
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The house was built in '07.
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On 9/9/2012 11:58 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Some asshats never learn ...
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On 9/10/2012 8:06 AM, Swingman wrote:

I kind of think it depends on where you live. As we can see different areas have different needs. We need roofs that will support heavy snow.
Cali needs earthquake proof homes, and homes that don't cause them cancer.
Texas needs an oil well in every yard.
Florida needs hurricane shutters.
Oklahoma through Missouri needs tornado shelters...
And we all could use a bigger shop, lots of pretty wood, and the knowledge of what to do with it.
And Festools to go around. And for me a Saw Stop.
Now that should really provoke some long winded discussion that's really off topic.
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On Thu, 06 Sep 2012 20:12:12 -0400, tiredofspam wrote:

No real need, I'm not going to have anything but one hand washing sink and it can drain out back(one of the advantages of living in the middle of nowhere), I would not run water line under the slab anyway, a leak under a slab can cause an enormous amount of damage before you know it. There are ways to protect from this, but mostly much to do about nothing around here.
The electrical will stub up and go through the wall, with branch wiring in conduit run overhead or along the wall, more flexible and future changeable that way.
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On 9/6/2012 9:37 PM, basilisk wrote:

I think part of the reason for coming up through the slab is for freeze protection of the water lines. If you live in an area where freeze protection is not needed, I see no reason you could not drill through the slab and bring the line up through an outside wall.
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