Shop Notes Tip: not sure it's a good idea

In the latest issue of Shop Notes, one of the tips is to put a dab of silicone caulk on the end of router bit shafts to prevent them from bottoming out in the router. Esentially, making a small silicone "stopper" on the end of the router bit shaft.
Couldn't this be potentially bad for the router because the silicone could put the bit out of balance? Granted, it would be just a little out of balance, but since they spin at a bazillion MPH (it seems), I think it would be a bad idea. It's not that difficult to keep them from bottoming out.
Anyone else see this and/or have an opinion?
Mike Dembroge
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Considering the very low weight of a dab of silicone that small and as close to center that it would have to be, it would have no noticeable effect. It would work but is more trouble than it is worth. You're right, it's not that hard to keep the bit off the bottom. A lot of the tips I have seen in magazines were obviously included not because they were a good idea but more because they have space to fill.

would
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Silicon blobs will get knocked off and fly around the shop like flubber. Use an 'O' ring instead, if you're that worried about it. Should be able to get a packet for a dollar or so from any gardening department.
Greg
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pixelated:

Uh, Grogs, HOW will the little silicone blob fly off the tip of the shaft--which is now buried inches deep in the collet and motor shaft of the routah?
O-ring it is.
--- -If thy poster offends thee, *PLONK* it out.- http://diversify.com Comprehensive Website Development
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"Larry Jaques" ...

Bad comprehension day. I read what he wrote then answered what I thought (thinking he mean't apply a blob near the top of the shaft near the cutter).

Still.
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On Sun, 14 Sep 2003 03:31:24 +0000, Mike Dembroge wrote:

An O-ring of the proper size in the bottom of the collet.
-Doug
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I use rubber O-Rings over the shaft to limit travel into the router. One for each bit.
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tip in some other current WW mag was to use small piece of 1/4" vinyl tubing to prevent the "flare of the router bit from being engaged by the collet. one foot would slice up into a bunch of spacers.
BRuce
Mike Dembroge wrote:

--
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BRuce


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Yeah, but when you need one hand to hold the router, one hand to operate the wench er.. wrench and one hand to hold the bit up that tiny amount you seem to run out of hands before the job gets done.
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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An "O" ring around of the shaft of the router bit will keep the bit from bottoming out and you won't need to hold up on the bit.
wrote:

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or just tighten the bit by hand, then pop it up a smidgeon with the wench, I mean wrench, before final tightening.
--
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Nuno Souto
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On Sun, 21 Sep 2003 02:09:31 GMT, "Courtney Mainord"

Exactly the same thing you are trying to do with the little blob of silicone the OP was commenting on. I suspect that many times the shaft on a bit isn't long enough for the silicone trick to work, but it might in many cases. My only real concern with that idea is how do you dig the little piece of silicone out of your collet after it detaches from the bit, as I'm sure it would for me. I like the o-ring idea better, but the silicone one is still a valid thought.
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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Courtney Mainord wrote:

======================================When did you meet my Dad...? lol
He is now long gone but years ago I was in my shop "playing" when he stopped by the house and suggested using a small "o" ring...
That was 30 or so years ago and I have been using "o" rings ever since..and leave them on the bits...
Bob Griffiths
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How is a o ring around the shank suposed to help?

from
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CW - I hope you're not 'trolling' ?
Anyway, the idea is to use an 'O' ring that fits the shank of the bit somewhat snuggly. 1- put the ring on the shaft and 'roll' it right up to the cutter 2- insert the bit till it 'bottoms out'. 3- raise the bit a 16th or so for 'clearance' 4- hold the bit in place with side pressure from your fingers, and roll the ring down to the chuck
That's it; that's all there is to it. Adjust the 'technique' depending on the length of your bits & the depth of your chuck.
Regards & Good Luck, Ron Magen Backyard Boatshop

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There are two scenarios here that need to be addressed:
1. The shaft of the bit is longer than the depth of the hole in the router shaft. In this case the bit needs to be prevented from bottoming out hard. Installing an O-ring with an o.d. equal to the i.d. of the router shaft at the bottom of the router shaft cures this. If a bit bottoms out there's still enough "give" for the collet to pull the bit down a slight amount when it is tightened.
2. The shaft of the bit is not long enough to bottom out but if it is not a straight bit there will be a fillet where the bit shaft meets the cutter head. This is where putting an O-ring with an i.d. equal to the bit shaft o.d. on the bit shaft to prevent the collet fingers from trying to tighten up on the fillet.
I hope my 2 cents helps. ;-) ARM
Ron Magen wrote:

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What you described could be done just as easily without the O ring. As described, it is just along for the ride.

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wrote:

I've never noticed a problem with it. I set the routah (PC-690) on its side on my bench, put the bit in so it bottoms out, pull it back out just slightly, and then hand-tighten the collet nut. Then I set one wrench around the bottom nut, lean that wrench handle against my benchtop, and engage the top wrench and tighten by pushing down against the wrench that's supported by my bench.
I do a final check by putting the routah on it's head and grabbing the two wrenches in the palm of my hand and squeezing (i.e., levering them against each other).
I'm no routah expert (in fact, I don't like using the thing), but in the time I've been using one, I've had zero skinned knuckles and no bits fly across the shop, or break or "self-adjust".
Chuck Vance
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