Shop Lighting opinions

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Highland Pairos wrote:

Airflow to dissipate heat.
--

dadiOH
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On Mon, 12 Jan 2009 10:38:48 -0500, Highland Pairos cast forth these pearls of wisdom...:

To allow the ballast to cool. Most ballasts cannot be mounted directly to a surface - they need airflow.
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-Mike-
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Yup, heat dissipation. It appears that the ballasts are mounted tight to the metal "shade", using it as a sort of heat sink.
Pete Stanaitis --------------------
Mike Marlow wrote:

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looking at replacing the flourescents with something else brighter.
As I age, I can appreciate the need for strong lighting in the shop.
What I and my buddy have done is to paint the place white - walls and ceilings - high gloss "Ultra White" from HD, then we went with the fluorescents you are ready to replace.
John went with the eight-foot two-bulb fixtures, I went with the cheap ($8.79) "Shoplights" from HD or Lowes. In either case, replacing the fixture is about the same price (8ft) or cheaper (4ft) than replacing the ballasts when they go.
Transporting the eight-footers is a bit much, I think, and they need to be "wired-in."
The shoplights come with a power cord that allows for simply plugging in the fixture and hanging it upon a couple of screw eyes (or a bent nail ;) and this makes it easy to re-arrange the position of the fixture should your first educated guess prove to be off a few cm.
You can use the current location of your power outlets as a guide, but I went with a uniform "string of fixtures about six-foot on center in each direction (lengthwise - widthwise) to locate the duplex outlets in my ceiling and wired one side Hot and the other switched. Using X-10 outlets, one could easily control area lighting in a large shop with this approach and I have done that as well in one shp which has two "sections" so as not to waste power but still allow one of the "three-way" switches to control the lighting (and charging station) circuit. THis circuit also controls power to the compressor so it doesn't recharge at three AM and wake the wife to wake me to go shut it off!
So, I say "stay with fluorescents- just add more of them!
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I've installed 37 4 foot 2 bulb fluorescent fixtures in my basement. About $20 each from Menards. Don't notice any buzzing or flickering. Not cheap at $20 per fixture. And they do need to be wired in. So that takes time and effort. But I'm happy with all of the light. Using the cheap bulbs because they are $0.80 per bulb compared to the $5 per bulb for the high CRI bulbs. Couldn't quite reconcile the difference. White walls and white floor are wonderful. Conduit as opposed to regular old 12/2 sheathed wire? Odd codes.
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That's a whole lot of fixtures and light bulbs. Do the street lights in your neighbourhood dim when you turn on your basement lights? How big *is* your basement?
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I like light. 1200 square feet. Approximately two rectangular rooms of 600 sq ft each. Six rows of three light fixtures each. With another one light behind the staircase. White painted walls and white painted floor.
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I like light. 1200 square feet. Approximately two rectangular rooms of 600 sq ft each. Six rows of three light fixtures each. With another one light behind the staircase. White painted walls and white painted floor.
A 1200 sq ft shop! That's huge! It would take me over a month to fill that size shop with half finished projects, cutoffs, new stock, old stock, half refurbed equipment, coffee cups, etc.
You are lucky.
Larry C
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1200 square feet. Approximately two rectangular rooms of 600 sq ft each. Six rows of three light fixtures each. With another one light behind the staircase. White painted walls and white painted floor.
Drive-by.
You suck.
jc
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

With that much light, you can probably grow some nice plants ;-)
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If you're looking for something to provide some task lighting that's movable but could be placed in conduit, there's various forms of track lighting available. Most take a standard 60W bulb (so CFL replacements are cheap and easy) and can be turned to light up the area you want them to light up.
I haven't used them in a shop environment, though, so it's hard to say how they'd hold up. It seems that one track light fixture will light up about the same area as one 4' flourescent fixture.
Puckdropper
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T8 fluorescents will probably be best. You don't say what type of conduit would be required. I would expect they would accept MC Cable which allows a lot of flexibility.
Mike M

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