Shop lighting: magnetic or electronic ballasts?

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snipped-for-privacy@cam.cornell.edu wrote:

<SNIP of useful stuff>
Very informative post -- thanks for the info. Helps with shop lighting...
Lot of good info in the post
--
Will
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wrote:

The more for less is a consideration, too... not so much now, but within a year or so, I hope to move the shop to Baja, and power conservation will be much more important..
mac
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mac davis wrote:

Actually if it is like some of the places I have lived and worked there ... having any power is a greater consideration.
Reliable power is of course a significant issue there as well. Just make sure you have a UPS for your computer system...

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Will
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wrote: <snip>

yeah, we have a good ups on our 2 main computers and those will go with us.. The way they're progressing in the area that we're building, the power will be in before we start the first house.. The economy part comes in with the pricing of the electricity... since the government controls the power, it's priced so that the Mexican people can afford it, about 2 1/2 cents a kilowatt... OTOH, after a fairly small amount of kilowatts, (the amount a middle class Mexican family would use), the price goes WAY up.... For most of the folks we've talked to that have lived thee a while, they seldom hit the higher rate, but none of them have a shop, either..
mac
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<snip>

At the risk of sending this thread completely down the toilet...
Has anyone investigated what it would take to run a shop off-grid? Say with photovoltaic or similar? (No waterwheels or human powered pitsaws considered, please.)
Patriarch
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On Sat, 02 Apr 2005 22:21:08 -0600, Patriarch

Photovoltaic is way too expensive and inefficient to run a shop. To get off grid you would need to look at wind power, hydro (waterwheel or generator) or steam or internal combustion motor generator. Depending on the area steam may have the best potential since you could use just about anything for fuel.
-- "We need to make a sacrifice to the gods, find me a young virgin... oh, and bring something to kill"
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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Tim Douglass wrote:

However unless you have a geothermal source steam's also likely to be the most expensive--either up front for a high pressure boiler and turbine or life-cycle in fuel costs for a low-efficiency low-pressure system.

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--John
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Patriarch wrote:

I have done some investigation for the upper midwest part of the USA (Minnesota and Iowa). Wind and thermal solar (concentrating reflectors either directly powering stirling cycle engines which turn generators or producing steam) appear to be the best choices at this time. AFAICT, PV panels and fuel cells don't appear to be good choices at the current state of art.
A lot depends on the shop. Not much is needed for a neander-hobby operation other than enough power for some lighting and a fractional horsepower motor. Obviously you'll need more to run a 3 HP Unisauer - and you'll need a /lot/ more if you have a shop full of 10 - 40 HP tools (especially if you power up more than one at a time.)
About half of the heat for my 50'x50' shop is provided by a single 6'x12' solar heating panel. I've determined that two more such panels would be adequate to keep the shop warm enough to be comfortable working in Levis and t-shirt on moderately sunny winter days.
My personal approach has been to do what's possible with the resources at hand and to keep alert for ways to improve on what I have. The general commercial context appears to be that the players with anything worthwhile to offer want to take huge profits at the front end - which makes their technology/products unaffordable to most of us until their patents run out and the Pacific Rim producers take over...
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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wrote:

i doubt very much that this would be practical... Harping on the Baja thing again, the 1st tract of homes on our "rancho" were in a designated solar area... meaning that they would never get power.. Everyone thought that this would be very cool in Baja but the folks can't sell their homes now (some only 1 or 2 years old) for near what they paid to build them.. After $10,000 US for a solar system, the generator kicks in if you run the microwave or a large hair dryer, so I can't see running any kind of power tool off them..
mac
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Brian, Electronic T-8 are the only way to go. As I have time, I am replacing all the ballasts in my shop. I have replaced 6 and have 13 more to go (larger shop).
woodstuff
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I thought about replacing the ballasts, but they aren't exactly cheap, plus don't you have to replace the sockets too? All of the lights with electronics ballasts have T-8 instead of T-12 bulbs.
I have lights with magnetic ballasts, but I am putting in a suspended ceiling and want to go with new troffer lights that go in the ceiling.
I am having a heck of a time find 2x2 troffer lights with electronic ballasts. Grainger has them for $66, but I just paid $38 for the 2x4 version at Lowes.
Brian Elfert
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I would look into the new T5 or T5HO. A little more money but they have significantly better color shifting properties and are more efficient. They are also much brighter that T8 or standard flouresents.
Dave
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