Shop layout/clean-up project - ideas

Hi everyone (especially Ed!),
I'm posting a drawing of my proposed shop layout in ABPW. Here's a description of the situation:
I have been working on reorganizing the shop and have used the Wood magazine insert with scale models of tools to try to come up with a good set up for my garage shop. I haven't set this up like this yet, and am curious to get some feedback from people to see what they think of my ideas.
A few notes about my space. There is a ceiling joist that runs the width of the shop, and is right behind the structural pole. Also, the ceiling is sloped at the back as marked on my picture to only 5' at the back. This is why I put the bandsaw, drill press, etc. in the front of the shop. I put the workbenches in the back, with the woodworking bench in the location with full headroom. I also put the lathe in the corner, figuring I don't need a lot of overhead space for that.
Here are a list of the major tools:
Delta Unisaw with 50" Biesemeyer and folding outfeed table on mobile base (drawing has model with only 30" fence) Delta 16.5" floor drill press Jet 14" bandsaw w/riser block Delta chop saw - will build mobile miter saw stand with extension wings Router table - will put on mobile base Delta 12.5" planer - will put on mobile cart that will allow use of other bench tools (i.e. combination belt/disk sander, oscillating spindle sander, maybe mortising machine). Jet mini lathe with extension. I have the leg set that came with it, but am considering the mobile stand that plansnow has listed with a lot of storage for tools, etc. Bench grinder/buffer station. I have a six inch grinder and the Oneway Wolverine jig, and also a slow-speed buffer for honing. Jet 1100 dust collector. Wasn't sure the best place to locate this. The dark line shows the path for PVC duct that I think I'll use. Is putting the separator at the base of the pole for use with table saw, jointer and planer a good idea? Will use blast gates so I can control loss of flow.
Other considerations/ideas:
Am thinking of putting in 6 feet of wall cabinets and floor cabinets for storage and work surface. Is this too much for my space? Is there a better way to get storage space in this type of shop? Not really shown on the drawing is several reasonable sized wall surfaces that I'll use to store jigs, sleds, etc.
Anyway, this turned into a longer post than I meant it to be.
Thanks for your help!
Mike
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Forgot a few things:
Jointer is Delta 6" the "new" bench (as yet unbuilt) will be Sam Allen's jointer's bench with a Veritas twin-screw end vise and Record 52 1/2 front vise. Probably will add a bank of drawers later for storage. Also, I'm going to build a nice wall-hung tool chest for my growing collection of hand tools. Likely placement will be on the wall just next to the outside door, on the lathe side.
Mike

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Mike in Mystic asks:

Looked at your drawing, and the space looks available. Storage space for any sized shop is basically an "everywhere you can find it" deal. I'm currently hanging wood, seamless paper, extra light stands and such between joists in my current garage shop. When I get back home, I'll have wall and floor space for that. Those shop sizes are very different, of course.
I'd say from the drawing 6' will work, but you didn't, or I missed, extend out the 24" width for the base cabinet. Will that get in the way?
One point: I'd avoid the laminate. Make the benchtop of whatever you choose (particle board worked for me--I doubled the top), then cover it with tempered hardboard, held down with brass or aluminum screws. You can then change the hardboard when it gets beat up and you won't have to worry about chipping laminate suraces with a missed chisel shot or hammer blow.
Charlie Self
"Don't hit at all if it is honorably possible to avoid hitting; but never hit soft." Theodore Roosevelt
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--
There are no stupid questions.
There are a LOT of inquisitive idiots.
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Mike in Mystic notes:

You're probably like most of us: use your elbow to sweep working space clear, when your hands are full of project. Then plunk it down and start chopping. Or spraying on varnish. Either way, the blinking laminate suffers while the hardboard just looks naturally used.
Charlie Self
"Don't hit at all if it is honorably possible to avoid hitting; but never hit soft." Theodore Roosevelt
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be
clear,
chopping. Or

My workbench has a laminate surface. It is durable, flat, and the particular pattern (granite) covers up wear. It looks great.
It is also slick. I am forced to put down an anti-skid pad way to frequently in the middle of projects. Eventually, I'll probably laminate a piece of hardboard over the laminate.
James...
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