Shop flooring material

Several months ago shop flooring was discussed. Within the thread, mention was made of two products for concrete basement floors: Delta-FL and Dricore. Google searches didn't yield any specific information for shop use. Does anyone have first hand experience or knowledge of either of these products? My shop is awaiting a floor and I must make a decision.
Thanks for any help.
Tin Woodsmn
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Hello 'Tin':
Griz here. Per your query: As an architect, I am bombarded with almost literally container-loads of, charitably, 'stuff' I am (they HOPE - usually to NO avail) to specify on plans and/or the notations.
After a quick scan of my related files and my catalogues (of similar junk), I can find nothing on either item you mentioned.
By the way, I had like results with Google.
What precisely are the items for, specifically? One (assumes) from the names, they are for dry (er?) floors? And/or insulation?
Let me/us know...
Warmly, Griz
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CharlesJ,
Thanks for the info.
Indeed, Subflor and DRIcore seem to be Coke-Pepsi matches. In fact, Subflor uses the Delta-FL membrane. Dimensions and other physical characteristics, etc. seem to be similar. However Subflor has a 15 year warranty vs. DRIcore's 10 year warranty. Price and availability will probably be the determining factor.
Tin Woodsmn

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CharlesJ,
Thanks for the info.
Indeed, Subflor and DRIcore seem to be Coke-Pepsi matches. In fact, Subflor uses the Delta-FL membrane. Dimensions and other physical characteristics, etc. seem to be similar. However Subflor has a 15 year warranty vs. DRIcore's 10 year warranty. Price and availability will probably be the determining factor.
Tin Woodsmn

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'Tin':
Hello again. 'Sorry about the dual posting but (frequently) of late my postings have not been going through - at all! - Not merely delayed. (?) So, as this seemed of some import, I tried to replicate it as best I could remember what I'd said.
Per the point: The dimples would indeed, to my thinking, allow some give.
Sounds like a good idea though. - Theoretically anyway, I'd like to see 'the numbers' on it.
As to whether this degree of resilience is acceptable in YOUR circumstance is for you to decide. I would think heavy machinery would cancel out these desirable effects by crushing it in significantly large areas.(?)
I would suggest simply placing 6-mil vapor barrier (plastic sheeting) down upon the floor (ideally UNDER the slab) being careful NOT to puncture it, overlap joints 6" (minimum) & tape the thoroughly! Leave 12"-16" laid up against the walls. Build your floor upon the film. After, when you are prepared to build the walls, lay and tape down (temporarily) the floor film to the floor (in the direction of the room's center), build the walls, then tape the 'floor-film' to that on the walls, taping in the same manner. Then that to the vb film at the ceiling. Tape over any and ALL punctures or other 'compromises' in the vapor barrier.
This is not, as they say, 'rocket science' and need not be done artfully, just thoroughly!
If you fear moisture to be a significant problem still (it shouldn't be), obtain a dehumidifier (or an ac unit) for the 'bad' times of the year. (?)
I live and work in the area that forms the junction of the Missouri & Mississippi Rivers. St. Charlse County Mo. (On a map, our county looks like a sauce-pan that somebody beat the living HELL out of somebody else with!) - T'ain't NO area 'wetter' (humid) at (MANY) times!
The method I laid out is the one, or a variation, most often used in this area in all manner of flatwork that is to be heated, is to contain subsequent structure(s) or where moisture, 'wicking up' through the floor by capillary-action is NOT welcome.
I hope this helps - If not, say so and I'll try again, as I'm sure will the others...
Warmly, Griz
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"Griz-- " "Both products are for providing dry floor systems on concrete. " "The Delta-FL is a plastic membrane dimpled to provide air flow below the "membrane. The dimples interlock at the edges to hold the system together. No "fasteners are needed. Wood, T & G plywood in my case, is used to provide an "underlayment floor for further finishing (vinyl, carpeting, Pergo, etc.). "Since the strength of the plastic is about 6,000 psf it should handle shop "machines with the plywood. The plywood does have to be fastened to the "concrete through the membrane. The membrane is available in 4'x8' sheets or "5'x65.6' lengths. " "DRIcore is similar to the above, but incorporates the wood with the membrane "into 2'x2' interlocking squares. Its strength is in excess of 5,000 psf. No "fastening to the concrete is necessary. " "My question is: would the 'give' of the dimples of the membranes give a "spongy feel to the floor, although it would be welcome versus the hardness "of concrete. Water in the basement is not my problem. Losing height from a "fastened wood runner system plus plywood topping is. " "I'm awaiting a call back from DRIcore regarding the spongy feeling and "availability in my area (Atlanta). I'll report back. " "Tin Woodsmn "
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CharlesJ,
Thanks for the info.
Indeed, Subflor and DRIcore seem to be Coke-Pepsi matches. In fact, Subflor uses the Delta-FL membrane. Dimensions and other physical characteristics, etc. seem to be similar. However Subflor has a 15 year warranty vs. DRIcore's 10 year warranty. Price and availability will probably be the determining factor.
Tin Woodsmn

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CharlesJ,
Thanks for the info.
Indeed, Subflor and DRIcore seem to be Coke-Pepsi matches. In fact, Subflor uses the Delta-FL membrane. Dimensions and other physical characteristics, etc. seem to be similar. However Subflor has a 15 year warranty vs. DRIcore's 10 year warranty. Price and availability will probably be the determining factor.
Tin Woodsmn

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Using the below search, do any of these results provide you with any useful information:
http://search.yahoo.com/search?x=op&va=durability&va_vt=any&vo=%22Delta-FL%22+%22Dricore%22&vo_vt=any&vst=0&vd=all&fl=0&ei=ISO-8859-1&vm=p&n
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Mo' Sawdust,
Thanks for the info. Most of the Yahoo references concerned themselves with mathematical functions and other Delta-FL products. There was one account of an actual installation of DRIcore which was very helpful.
Tin Woodsmn

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