Shop ceiling material

I am finishing out my shop and need help with the ceiling. The actual structure is one of those portable metal buildings (14'x28') with a gambrel style roof. I insulated the sides with r19 insulation and covered with enameled hardboard. I also insulated the ceiling by placing r19 paper backed fiberglass batting between the rafters (48" centers). I am now looking for a good clean way to cover up the sagging/swagging insulation suspended from my ceiling. As I understand, leaving the paper backing exposed is also a building code violation.
I tried the hardboard on the ceiling too but quickly stopped for 2 reasons: 1) It also sagged. 2) The day will come that I intend to move the structure so keeping the weight down is important to me.
I considered using the foil covered foam sheets but I read that this is also against building code. Sheetrock will be very difficult because of the gambrel style roof (as opposed to strictly horizontal) and I am mostly doing it by myself (could call a friend if I really really get in a jam). I don't want to use a suspended ceiling because I don't want to lose any remaining ceiling clearance. It is about 8' on the edges and 12' in the center.
Consequently, my criteria- in order of importance- are adhering to proper building code regulations, weight, cosmetics (ability to withstand dust), durability, cost and the ability to put it up alone. What suggestions/thoughts does anyone here have?
Thanks in advance. Anthony
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Anthony Morris asks:

snip
First chore is to check the actual local building regs. You're guessing, which can get expensive. There MAY be differences in code for non-residential movable buildings, as compared to residences, too.
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Normally the limits of what you can do are defined by code or ordinance. That's where a contractor is handy, but you can fight your way through on your own, too.
If they allow it, I'd use that slick thin fiberglass panel they use in milking parlors. Furred every two feet would do for sag (does in my house) and it slicks off great with the vacuum. Don't even consider washing off sawdust, it makes a plaster.

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Well, you don't want to lose space with a drop ceiling, so you could do what I did in mine. I used drop ceiling but put the runners up with just enough space to get the tiles in and out. I lost about 2 inches, the height of the runners plus the thickness of the tiles. You can lay it out to follow the pitch of the ceiling, and not lose but a couple inches. Just a thought.
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