Shop Cabinet Door

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I'm thinking of adding a couple of doors to a shop cabinet. One thought I had was simply to install hinges, and cut the door out of a piece of 5/8 or 3/4 plywood. If I install the hinges first, then I don't have to mess with holding the door in place after it's cut. (I'll remove the hinges to cut it.)
A jigsaw would probably be used to make the cuts, it'll give me a smooth and square finish.
Would this work, or do I need to cut the door out first?
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message

Might work. Give it a try. If you don't like the results you can always make a real door out of some more plywood.
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Puckdropper wrote:

What a wonderful Idea! Or even better, hang the door then cut out a hole to match it.
--
G.W. Ross

A good pun is its own reword.
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I usually just use a straight board held to the cabinet with spring clamps. This gives me a ledge to set the door on while I position it and screw the hinges to the case (I fasten the hinges to the door before installing the door).
For cabinets that don't have anything to grip to, I often use spacer blocks from the trim below or whatever.
Anthony
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On 4/26/2012 11:05 PM, Puckdropper wrote:

LOL ...
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On 4/26/2012 11:05 PM, Puckdropper wrote:

the only problem with this method, and i've only used it on fence gates, not cabinets, is that the hinges will not be pre loaded, and thus the door (gate) drops a bit when you cut it out. If you can figure out a way to offset this slack, then it'll work fine.
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Steve Barker
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"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message

Aren't you a bit late? Like 26 days? Art
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Nothing humourous was meant... I want to cut the doors right out of the same piece of ply used for the rest of the cabinet, and thought mounting the hinges first and then removing them before cutting the door out would make assembly easier.
Plus, the spacing around the door would be equal on all sides, since it's just a saw kerf wide.
Just wanted to ask before I took all the time to set this up and cut the pieces out. When it seems this easy, it's often a good idea to ask about "gotchas".
Puckdropper
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On 4/27/12 10:28 PM, Puckdropper wrote:

Put a slight angle on the blade and you'll get a built in stop.
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-MIKE-

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On 4/27/2012 10:28 PM, Puckdropper wrote:

The "gotcha" with a jig saw is a "start point", for the first cut, and at each corner ... you normally have to drill a hole in order to start the cut, which ruins either door (cutoff), or the frame around the door.
What you want to do is known as a "plunge cut". There are a couple of ways to do this with a circular saw, and a guide rail with built in "stops", also best done with the circular blade at full extension. You can then use a jig saw to cut to the corners cleanly.
Hate to mention it, but I use a Festool TS75 to do this very thing for making doors and windows for chicken coops:
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/ChezPouletAustin_Ranchette02#5677889345052179698
Scroll on down and you can see how the doors and windows are framed and hinged, so that the siding lines up, using the plunge cut "cutouts"
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On 4/28/2012 11:26 AM, Swingman wrote:

https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/ChezPouletAustin_Ranchette02#5677889345052179698
Better shot of the plunge cut setup in case you can't scroll to it:
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/ChezPouletAustin_Ranchette02#5677888510363206866
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On 4/28/12 11:26 AM, Swingman wrote:

https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/ChezPouletAustin_Ranchette02#5677889345052179698
Love the plywood I-beams.
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-MIKE-

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On 4/28/2012 12:18 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

Keep six of them around all the time, all the same height no matter which side up ... the uses to which they can be put is limited only by imagination.
Worth giving up a bit of limited shop space many times over.
I think I even have Leon making some now. ;)
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On 4/28/12 1:25 PM, Mike Marlow wrote:

I wish I could attribute it to being observant. I think I'm just too anal. :-) Seriously, I find I often get too caught up in the process instead of the results. Not that the results suffer, but it often makes the process less enjoyable. So when I look at a picture of something someone made, my brain tends to gravitate towards "how did he do that and would it make my process more efficient?" before actually admiring the product.
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Yeah, they're pretty cool, + considerably lighter than steel I-beams. Do you wax them to keep finishes from sticking?
-- You never hear anyone say, 'Yeah, but it's a dry cold.' -- Charles A. Budreau
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On 4/28/2012 3:40 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

??? Can't say I have ever had a problem with a finish sticking to any thing to the point that it was a problem... Then again my finishes go on thin and absolutely with out runs. I use Gel varnishes and can varnish one side. immediately flip it and put it down on the work surface to do the other side.

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wrote:

When, during Texas summers? Waterlox takes 15 minutes to dry to the touch, but I wouldn't dream of tipping a freshly finished piece on a finished side even then. Are you talking about cabinet sides which will be screwed together?
-- You never hear anyone say, 'Yeah, but it's a dry cold.' -- Charles A. Budreau
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On 4/29/2012 8:36 AM, Larry Jaques wrote:

Any time of year and any piece, cabinet sides inner and outer sides, door fronts and backs, totally covered in one application per coat.
Now mind you I don't let them stay against a particular flat surface while curing, only during application. After application I typically stand them up on the floor and leaning up against an object to let there be full ventilation on all sides. I might be working on 15~20 pieces at one time.
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wrote:

Oh, OK. But, still, it's amazing that it doesn't stick even during a few minute rest on the fresh finish.
-- You never hear anyone say, 'Yeah, but it's a dry cold.' -- Charles A. Budreau
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On 4/29/2012 10:12 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

By the same token, dust is really not an issue either.
You should give gel stains and varnishes a try. Old Masters is a pretty good brand, read and follow the directions on the can.
Or basically, apply how ever you want to do so and wipe off "immediately". 10 or so minutes later wipe again with a fresh clean cloth. Let dry 4~8 hours and repeat 2 or more times.
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