Shipping Costs

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Something you may not be aware of is that UPS and FedEx both offer services where they actually maintain the parts inventory at one of _their_ warehouses and deliver from that stock.
If Delta is doing enough volume on parts they might be using one of those services. If they are it pretty well rules out using USPS.
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warbler wrote:

I'm curious as to what 1-oz part shuts the jointer down dead?
But, as a side note, while I don't disagree w/ assessment that S/H charge of $8 is really out of line, a USPS first class envelope would be less than $1 actual shipping cost--of course, the labor and ancillary support costs still make it probably a break-even deal at best for Delta.
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dpb wrote:

Me too.

I agree. If I was the seller, I would drop the shipping cost to two bucks and raise the price of the part to 9.
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warbler wrote:

Someone has to take your order, someone else has to pick the item and put the item in a box. _Then_ it has to be passed to a shipping company.
Employees and shippers don't work for free, and boxes don't grow on a tree behind the warehouse.
Think about the alternative, which is where the MBA's close the spare parts warehouse because it costs to much to run and to maintain an inventory. Every inventory, in every situation, is somebody's money tied up.
Why didn't you go and pick it up? <G>
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But really, how is your scenario (take order, pick up item, put in box, then send to shipper) that much difference than if you walked into the parts place and picked it up (take order, jaw with customer for awhile, go get part, ring up sale, bag item, hand bag to customer), which the exception of the actual shipping cost? Or even worse, a retail location, where they need to stock shelves, maintain a large storefront as well as stockroom, have cashiers, etc.
Clint

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Clint wrote:

The handling costs, which is probably why they don't offer that service. If they do offer the service to locals, they're eating the costs of a small number of folks who can actually take advantage of it.

The part wouldn't be $3, it would be $9-10. <G>
Do you think if Woodcraft ordered that part for you it would have been the same price? I'll bet it would have cost more. If it was $3, at the minimum you'd have to wait weeks, possibly months, until it was grouped with other spares and picked, packed, and shipped as a single order. Maybe you'd get lucky and get it fast, if an order was ready to ship and your part got in the same box.
You're dealing with fixed vs. variable costs. The bare bones cost of the operation is the same, regardless if the part is $3 or $300.
If you bought (3) of the parts, the shipping probably still would have been $8, but for $9 worth of parts.
Remember, be happy you GOT the part. MBA's look at spares operations every day and close them as cash holes. 8^(
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With my company, we operate two retail stores with a warehouse in the back of one of the retail stores for shipping internet orders. When shipping an order, our shipper must first make sure the address verification passed with the credit card issuer, if it didn't, he must manually verify it with a phone call to the credit card issuer. Next, he must pull the order, for a larger order, this can take some time, as sometimes some of the product is in the warehouse and some of it is in the retail store. Next we must pack the order in the smallest box possible while still having enough room to properly protect the products. Sometimes this might require partially packing an order until you realize that it's not really the best box (especially with new shippers). Then the box is sealed and weighed. The weight is entered into the shipping software, shipping method is selected, and a label is printed. The package is placed on a cart to be taken to the "outgoing shipment" rack.
It definitely is more work than standing out front at the register ringing customers out. We mark up our shipments $2-$3 to cover the price of the box, peanuts, packing tape, and labor. The rest of the shipping fee goes to UPS. And this doesn't even account for the times when our website under quotes shipping because the item is larger than the weight would imply.
Companies are not getting rich off of shipping fees... well, except for the shipping company ;)
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Thanks for the clarification.
Clint

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Locutus wrote: <why shipping is expensive>
I've never owned a retail or mail order business, but I know that as a consumer, I'm totally irrational when it comes to shipping charges. I hate to pay shipping. I totally empathize with the original poster. If they said the part was $11 and the shipping was free, then I would feel like I'm getting a good deal -- a fixed jointer for $11! Instead, the part is $3 and the shipping is $8, so I feel like I'm getting ripped off. Like I said, this is not rational and I have tried over and over again to remove this irrational thought pattern, but it is very difficult (at least for me). I think it is akin to human's inability to evaluate risk in certain situations.
It might be that Amazon has trained me this way.
I have often wondered what would happen to my Lee Valley habit if they lowered their shipping charges substantially. For example, a medium shoulder plane is $159. Shipping, if you just order the plane, is $12.50, bringing the total to $171.50. More than once, I have gotten to the checkout page, seen $12.50 and said, "$12.50 for shipping! Oh nevermind." So what if the plane cost $169 and the shipping was $3? That seems like a much better deal, even though the total ($172) is higher.
Like I said, I am totally irrational about this. Does anybody else have a similar reaction?
Mark
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wrote:

I agree, to a limit. To me, shipping seems like a license to steal. Shipping charges do appear to be out of line. I've heard the defense - the cost of picking the item, the box, packing materials, etc, etc, but IMO, that's the cost of doing business. That it's not reflected in the item cost makes that item actually too cheap. You can't *really* get the blurfl for $20, it's actually $30.
As a point of reference, I ordered a pair of gloves from www.moosejaw.com They didn't fit right, so I returned them. I had a choice here. They include a return shipping label with the merchandise they sell you. All you have to do is put the stuff in a box, slap the label on the box and put it in the mail. Easy. 'Cept that using their label would reduce my refund by $8. $8 to use their return label.
An option was available to send it on my nickel. That's what I did. I cost about $3.50 at my local post office.
It's going to take them just as much effort on their end to open the box and restock with either option. It just cost me less to pay the postage up front.
BTW, I was credited the full amount of my purchase. Moosejaw is a class organization. I'll be happy to do business with them at some future time.
This is what the shipping apologists miss - giving the appearance of using shipping as a profit center just turns the customer off. But I suppose those organizations have more business than they need so they can afford to make some percentage of their customers look elsewhere the next time they need something.
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George Max wrote:

Companies like Delta might actually WANT you to try an "authorized repair depot" before you go directly to them. They are using B2B type policies simply because they aren't interested in setting up a true retail operation. Try calling them to buy a complete tool.
I went through this just yesterday with a Bosch router part. I was able to walk into a busy tool repair shop in Hartford, CT and buy the $15 part, saving the $10 that Bosch wants to ship it from the Norwood, MA warehouse.
The same shop also repairs and stocks spare parts for Makita, DeWalt, Porter Cable, Delta, toasters, vacuum cleaners, etc...
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warbler wrote:

I'm sure you understand Delta's point of view that the other posters reminded you of.
Yeah, I know, just on principle, it doesn't seem right when shipping is double the cost of the item.
Got to have something to complain about, I understand. LOL
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Hey, you got a bargin!
I'm still more than pissed off at Ford. Spent $15k on a new Focus, and the antenna got clipped off by the garage door when it was 6 months old. My fault, sure- but all it needs is a little sheet metal mount that a new antenna will screw onto. They wanted $8 for that, $40 for a new antenna (I was told I had to buy it if I wanted the clip), $25 for them to recieve it at the dealership from the warehouse, and I'd have to pay in advance and go back two weeks later to pick it up in person.
So that's $73 for an $8 part- and I'd still have to drive 30 miles to pick it up. Good thing the car has a cd player, I guess.
(Of course I'm just going to make a new mount at work on my lunch break one of these days and save that $$$, but it's worth getting really irritated about- an $8 part has guaranteed them that I will never buy another Ford.)
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wrote:

But you aren't angry at yourself for not misjudging the height of the garage door?
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wrote:

Yes, I am. It's a low door (in an old house), and I was removing the antenna every time I backed out for six months, and forgot one day. So I take some of the responsibility for it- but I still don't understand why it was designed like the barb of a fishhook sticking out of the top of the roof in the first place.
Either way, it seems like the sort of thing they could keep one or two of at the dealership, and sell them for the $8 they wanted for the part- instead of trying to cash in on it.
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Because you think a lot of people do this? :)
They should also keep one or two of every other misc part then as well... for every make and model they sell. And the variations for each model year... before you know it they are sitting on thousands of dollars worth of inventory that has very little demand. Not a good business decision.
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On Wed, 18 Oct 2006 10:56:47 -0400, "Locutus"

Seems fairly likely, given the design. Wouldn't have to be a garage door- backing out of anywhere that had an overhead obstruction of any sort would clip the thing off.

Perhaps not- but this is a tiny part that would easily fit into a drawer on the mechanic's desk- with room left over for about 1000 other tiny parts as well.
Ah well, now I'm just bitching. I see your point- there was just more to the story with that particular dealership messing up the paperwork on the initial sale, requiring two additional trips back to the place, and endless irritiating phone calls (about three a week) for a month where they all but demanded I give them a good review on a survey they were sending out.
After all that, it would have been nice if *something* could have gone smoothly and in my favor.
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Frank Arthur wrote:

My buddy's bicycle shop, where I work part-time, is a big Thule and Yakima rack dealer.
At least once a month, we have a customer who forgets about the loaded roof rack or Rocket Box, and attempts to drive into the garage. Sometimes, they're even driving quite fast! 8^(
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wrote:

Yet another reason to keep the damn car out of the shop...errr garage ;-)
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.. which you could probably get from a junkyard for a buck and a half...
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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