Shellac in the Bathroom?

I have a cherry bathroom cabinet I am making to go abouve the toilet to hold TP rolls and some cleaning supplies (no liquids though). Normally I finish Cherry with Watco followed by Shellac. However, I'm somewhat unsure about the shellac in the bathroom.
Now I know Shellac is the unusual charateristic of being about the best vapor barrier, while not really liking direct contact with water.
The particular bathroom in question doesn't really steam up when I take a shower, the mirrors are clear when I get out, even after a long shower.....
What do you guys (and gals) think....
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Having seen just how badly standing liquid water can damage a Shellac finish, I wouls really shy away frim using it in kitchen or bathroom where steam is around and where water can fly.I think even just a few thin coats of some wipe on poly (the only way I like to use it) would seal it and you can do that over your normal Shellac.
As I said, I would shy away. I wouldn't rule it out but would not suggest.
On Mar 11, 9:32 am, brian_j snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

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brian_j snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I used shellac on my bathroom trim and doors. After about 3 years some of the trim and doors showed some deterioration of the finish, especially in my daughter's bathroom. She takes looooooooong showers, and the ventilation is poor. Thus, there is a lot of condensation on the upper portions of the doors and trim, and that's where the deterioration was worst.
However, the fix was quite easy. I just scuff-sanded the shellac and slapped on another coat, and now it looks great! There may be other finishes more durable, but not easier to apply, and removal is a breeze, too.
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On Wed, 11 Mar 2009 09:32:43 -0700, brian_j_roth wrote:

Doesn't sound to me like you'd have a problem, especially if you used freshly made dewaxed shellac. But even if you do you can, as another respondent said, just wipe on another coat.
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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On Wed, 11 Mar 2009 09:32:43 -0700 (PDT), brian_j snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Polyurethane. Holds up better to moisture, plus alcohol won't hurt it.
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Phisherman wrote:

Or a precatalyzed lacquer.
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