shellac for preventing bird's eye maple tearout?

Fine set block plane and scraper will *almost* prevent tearout. Will a couple of coats of shellac applied before smoothing fill in and strengthen tearout-prone grain? Orange or garnet shellac would have the additional advantage of showing which areas have and haven't been planed / scraped.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/13/2011 11:24 PM, Ferd Farkel wrote:

Hmm, that's an interesting question; I've never heard of anyone trying that before. I'd almost have to think it would have *some* positive effect. Certainly seems worth running some experiments to see what happens.
--
Free bad advice available here.
To reply, eat the taco.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That looks like a good idea. May help when running through the thickness planer also. WW
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Answer a few questions.
1. How deep do you expect the shellac to penetrate? Most varnishes don't, would shellac, especially in a dense hard wood like maple? 2. If it is simply on the surface like most varnishes, what protection will it provide against tear out if you have to scrape the shellac off to get to the actual board area that needs scraping?
Solutions I have heard about that have been reported to work.
1. Sand the surface vs. scrape or plane. 2. If planing spray a mist of water on the surface just prior to planing to soften the wood, to "help prevent" tear out.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Birdseyes are end grain, so 2 lb or thinner cut should penetrate easily.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/14/2011 7:15 PM, Ferd Farkel wrote:

Fred, how's Fannie and the rest of the Farkel family faring?
;)
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 4/15/2010
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sparkle says "hiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii..."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 13 Jan 2011 21:24:55 -0800 (PST), Ferd Farkel

Like the others, I've not heard of this before. I suspect a more dilute concentration might work better than a thicker solution (say, 1lb cut or less). And perhaps a slower drying solution would allow the shellac to penetrate more. You could try dissolving in isopropyl alcohol for that.
Is your block plane a low angle? Have you tried a higher angle plane or a higher angle bevel on your block plane blade? A bevel up smooth plane is a handy thing to have in your arsenal.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

LN low angle block, iron set light, mouth almost completely closed. If that tears (and it didn't on unshellacked BE -- yet), go to the scraper. If I do another project in bird's eye, I'll make or buy a scraper plane. A 24" sole scraper would make a nice addition to my tool set.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Very interesting idea. I think you've volunteered to run some tests and see. If I had to hazard a guess, I'd think that if the tearout was only a coat of shellac deep, you don't need the shellac to prevent tearout, but it's certainly cheap and easy enough to test.
The spit coat of shellac suggestion someone else mentioned makes sense, but what I'd really like to see is if you could figure out how to start with the French Polish and end with it, too. ;)
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Results -- waste of time. Keeping edges **sharp** and set light -- plane taking fluff instead of shavings, light burr on the scraper -- did the job beautifully. Shellac (applied one side) did nothing but make the 3/8" maple curl up like a Frito.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

After failing to achieve the desired results with a sharp York pitch L-N No 4 and scraper alone I've used shellac for this purpose... You need to scrape, reapply the shellac, scrape, reapply the shellac, and repeat as needed until the surface is uniformly smoothed. The shellac doesn't soak into hard dense woods very deep so reapplications are needed. The alternative is sandpaper and a sanding block... ;~)
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've been using heavily diluted Hydrocote sealer to do the same thing. It usually works pretty well. I apply at least 2 coats to the tearout area. I brush on one coat on whole board then check the tearout areas to see if its soaked in (it usually has) then reapply only to the tearout area until it won't take any more (stops absorbing). It looks like a thin puddle on the tearout area, wait about an hour, apply a second coat to the whole board and your done. The thicker the board the longer the wait (dry) time.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.