Shellac flake shelf life

I want to finish a recent project using orange shellac, dissolved at home. Purchasing flakes locally is somewhat expensive (the cost, gas, time), about $25 for a pound at Woodcraft. Alternatively, I could buy 5 pounds of top-quality flakes online for $100 and have a supply, but that may take 10 years or so to use. Has anyone used old dewaxed flakes without any issues? If so, how did you store the flakes? In a refrigerated glass jar?
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Phisherman wrote:

<http://books.google.com/books?id=RJun1eW3kigC&pg=PA72&lpg=PA72&dq=shellac+shelf+life+storage&source=bl&ots=2YzTlbp0Hw&sig=CZ0-nWfWKgeGIMZcFByuIbbJfIg&hl=en&ei=Eqr1StuKA43eNaiSoOkF&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=7&ved B0Q6AEwBg#v=onepage&q=shellac%20shelf%20life%20storage&fúlse>
--
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

*trim*
You store your flakes in an electronic book?
Puckdropper
--
Maybe.

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have heard that unmixed you should not have over a 1 year supply and of course don't mix more than you can use ina relatively short period of time.
I think I would give up the 25% savings and go with what you need right now. If any of the 5 #'s goes bad, you likely will be in the hole.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Here's an excerpt from an article on shellac by Jeff Jewitt. He, by the way, sells finishing supplies (Homestead Finishing Products) and most of the time I've called to order something, Jeff answers the phone and will give you advice. He sells high quality shellac by the pound.. I like buying the dry stuff because you can mix up just the amount you need and save the rest without it going bad for a long time.. http://www.homesteadfinishingproducts.com/index.html
"Dry shellac flakes store indefinitely under proper conditions, but contrary to what you may hear, it won't store forever. Given enough time, especially under hot, wet conditions, dry shellac reacts with itself to form polymers that are insoluble in alcohol. Shellacs that have been dewaxed are more prone to this. You can extend the usable life of dry shellac flakes by storing them after purchase in a cool, dry area -- a refrigerator is best. A test for suspected old shellac is easy -- simply dissolve the flakes in alcohol. Most shellacs should be totally dissolved within three days. If you see a gelatinous mass after this time, the shellac is past its usable life and should be discarded (don't confuse natural wax with this). If you just purchased it, return it to the company you bought it from. Sometimes in summer months, shellac will cake together. This is known in the industry as "blocking" and is not a sign of bad shellac. Break up the shellac with a hammer and dissolve it in alcohol as usual."

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

http://www.shellacshack.com/purchase-shellac-flakes.html
http://www.shellac.net/ShellacPricing.html
Maybe one of these sources is a better option? Shipping will be sort of expensive but there's less time and no gas expense.

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Why bother with flakes? Get the stuff in a can pre mixed. You can cut it with alcohol too and has a 3 year shelf life.
There is a video by the "Wood Whisperer" at his web site that explains how to use it, cut it, etc.
Otoe
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 11 Nov 2009 00:15:08 -0500, Otoe wrote:

There is one difference. The flakes are non-toxic when the alcohol has evaporated - or before if you use Everclear :-). The Zinsser stuff has an additive that apparently does make it toxic, although that may or may not be true after it dries..
For most stuff it doesn't make any difference, but for childrens toys or stuff that might come into contact with food, I prefer the flakes.
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I keep my stash wrapped up tight in plastic storage bags in a cardboard box. I don't know how many years I've had the flakes now, and they dissolve just as well as they did when new. Keep them dry and away from heat, and they should last forever.
The difference in quality between making up your own shellac from flakes and buying the pre-mixed stuff is worth the effort and expense. Think hand-crafted microbrew vs. warm Miller Lite from a can. It is my favorite finish - quick drying, forgiving, and beautiful.
Scott
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You could ask O'Deen when his birthday was.
Regards,
Tom Watson http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 /
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.